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OFFICERS 


OF  THE 


ARMY   AND    NAVY 


(REGULAR) 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL  WAR. 


EDITED   BY 

MAJOR  WILLIAM   H.   POWELL,  U.  S.  ARMY, 

AND 

MEDICAL-DIRECTOR   EDWARD  SHIPPEN,  U.  S.  NAVY. 


PUBLISHED   BY 

L.  R.  HAMERSLY  &   CO., 

PHILADELPHIA,    PA. 

I  8  0  2. 


No. 


762 


?«1 


COPYRIGHT,    1S92,    BY    L.  R.   HAMERSLV    &    Co. 


Printed  by  J.  B.  Lippincott  Company,  Philadelphia. 


/ 


PREFACE. 


The  thought  which  inspired  the  publication  of  this  volume  was  that  of  gathering  together,  in 
one  work,  the  faces  and  life-sketches  of  as  many  as  possible  of  the  officers  of  the  Regular  Army 
and  Navy  who  served  during  the  Civil  War,  not  that  they  themselves  might  view  their  own  pictures 
and  records,  but  that  future  generations  might  read  with  pride  of  the  part  their  ancestors  played, 
and  look  with  pleasure  on  the  faces  of  those  who  acted  in  the  great  tragedy  for  the  preservation 
of  our  noble  and  powerful  republic,  at  a  time  when  its  existence  as  a  single  government  seemed 
about  to  terminate. 

The  volume  contains  not  only  the  pictures  and  sketches  of  the  greatest  of  our  generals  and 
admirals,  but  those  of  men  who  did  their  part  in  the  great  struggle,  whether  with  sword  or 
rifle,  although  of  a  minor  character,  and  who  will  feel  proud  of  occupying  places  beside  those 
of  such  great  distinction  as  Grant,  Farragut,  Sherman,  Porter,  Sheridan,  and  others. 

Old  comrades,  who  have  not  met  for  years,  will  also  be  pleased  to  see  how  Time  is  dealing 
with  the  living,  and  will  gaze  with  fondness  on  the  faces  of  those  who  no  longer  respond  to  the 
bugle's  call,   or  have  sailed  to  "unknown  seas." 


OFFICERS    OF    THE   ARMY   AND   NAVY 


(REGULAR) 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL  WAR. 


REAR-ADMIRAL  JAMES  ALDEN,  U.S.N. 

Iames  Alden  was  born  in  Maine.  Appointed  mid- 
shipman from  same  State  April  i,  [828.  Promoted  to 
passed  midshipman  June  14,  1834;  Navy- Yard,  Boston, 
1835;  exploring  expedition  around  the  world  1838-42. 
Commissioned  as  lieutenant  February  25,  1841  ;  Naval 
Station,  Boston,  1843  ;  frigate  "  Constitution,"  around  the 
world,  second  time,  1 844-46  ;  while  attached  to  this  vessel, 
commanded  a  boat  expedition  ami  cut  out  several  war- 
junks  from  under  the  guns  of  the  fort  at  Zuron  Bay, 
Cochin-China ;  Home  Squadron  during  Mexican  war 
present  at  the  capture  of  Vera  Cruz,  Tuspan,  and  Tobasco 
Naval  Station,  Boston,  1847;  Coast  Survey,  1848-60 
made  a  reconnoissance  of  all  the  West  coast.  In  the 
winter  of  1855-56,  during  the  Indian  war  in  Puget  Sound, 
volunteered  with  the  surveying  steamer  "Active,"  to  co- 
operate with  the  army,  and  rendered  important  aid  in 
bringing  the  war  to  a  close  ;  by  his  timely  arrival  in  the 
spring  of  the  same  year,  at  San  Juan  Island,  prevented  a 
collision  between  the  British  naval  forces  and  the  United 
States  troops ;  assisted  in  landing  troops  enough  to  hold 
the  island  in  dispute  against  the  threatened  attack  of  the 
British.  Commissioned  as  commander  September  14, 
1855  ;  commanding  the  steamer"  South  Carolina,"  at  the 
commencement  of  the  Rebellion,  May,  1861  ;  reinforced 
Fort  Pickens,  while  blockading  Galveston,  Texas;  had  a 
fight  with  the  batteries  in  the  rear  of  the  city  ;  while  there, 
captured  thirteen  schooners  laden  with  merchandise; 
commanded  sloop  "  Richmond,"  at  the  passage  of  Forts 
Jackson  and  St.  Philip,  and  the  engagement  with  Chal- 
mette  batteries  and  defences  of  New  Orleans ;  passage 
of  Vicksburg  batteries  twice;  Port  Hudson,  1862-63. 
Commissioned  as  captain  January  2,  1863;  commanded 


steam-sloop"  Brooklyn,"  in  the  action  with  Forts  Morgan 
and  Gaines,  and  the  rebel  gunboats  in  Mobile  Bay ;  com- 
manded in  two  attacks  on  Fort  Fisher.  Captain  Alden 
took  a  prominent  part  in  all  the  great  naval  battles  of  the 
war,  and  was  handsomely  mentioned  in  the  official  re- 
ports. Commissioned  as  commodore  July  25,  1866; 
commanding  steam-sloop  "  Susquehanna,"  special  service, 
1867;  commanding  steam-frigate  "Minnesota,"  special 
service,  1867-68;  commandant  Navy-Yard,  Mare  Island, 
California,  1868-69;  chief  of  Bureau  of  Navigation  and 
Detail,  Navy  Department,  1869-71.  Promoted  to  rear- 
admiral  1 871;  commanding  European  Squadron  1872. 
Retired  1873.     Died  1877. 

5 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  Ji  >HN  J.  AI.MY.  U.S.N. 

John  J.  Ai  \n  was  born  in  Rhode  Island  in  [815,  and 
appointed  a  midshipman  at  fourteen.  After  a  cruise  in 
the  Mediterranean,  and  another  on  the  coast  of  Brazil, 
he  was  promoted  passed  midshipman  [835.  After  serv- 
ing in  the  receiving  ship  "  New  York"  he  was  attached 
to  the  "  Cyane,"  in  the  Mediterranean,  as  acting-master 
and  navigator,  for  three  years.  In  March,  1 841,  he  was 
commissioned  as  lieutenant,  and  served  in  the  West  Indies 
and  on  the  coast  of  Africa.  He  was  next  attached  to  the 
"  <  >hio,"  74,  in  the  Gulf  of  Mexico  and  the  Pacific, 
during  the  Mexican  war.  lie  was  at  the  siege  ami 
capture  of  Vera  Cruz,  and  the  capture  of  Tuspan.  In 
the  latter  part  of  the  war,  1  848,  he  commanded  one  of 
the  forts  at  Mazatlan,  during  the  occupation  by  the  navy. 
Following  this  came  a  service  of  five  years  upon  the 
coast  survey  ;  and  then  he  was  ordered  to  command  the 
"  Fulton,"  during  the  operations  on  the  coast  of  Central 
America,  consequent  upon  General  Walker's  doings  in 
that  region.  Walker  surrendered  to  Rear-Admiral  Pauld- 
ing on  board  the  "  Fulton,"  at  Nicaragua.  The  admiral 
complimented  Lieutenant  Almy  very  highly,  saying, 
"  He  performed  his  part  of  the  work  exceedingly  well. 
and  is  an  officer  who  can  he  relied  upon  at  all  times." 
Lieutenant  Almy  then  commanded  the  "  Fulton,"  in  the 
Paraguay  Expedition,  and,  upon  her  return,  was  attached 


to  the  New  York  Navy-Yrard.  He  was  made  commander 
in  April,  1861,  as  the  civil  war  broke  out.  He  was  then 
constantly  in  command  on  the  Atlantic  coast.  While 
commanding  the  "  Connecticut,"  he  captured  and  sent  in 
four  noted  blockade-running  steamers,  with  valuable  car- 
goes.    He  ran  ashore  and  destroyed  four  others. 

Commissioned  as  captain  March,  1865.  Commanded 
the  "Juniata,"  in  a  cruise  to  the  coast  of  Africa  and  the 
coast  of  Brazil.  While  on  the  coast  of  Brazil  he  rescued 
the  Brazilian  brig  "Americo"  and  her  crew  from  ship- 
wreck. The  service  was  attended  with  great  danger,  and 
for  it  he  was  thanked  by  the  Emperor  of  Brazil,  the  late 
Dom  Pedro.  In  1868-69  Captain  Almy  was  on  ordnance 
duty  at  Navy- Yard,  New  York.  In  December,  1869,  he 
was  commissioned  commodore,  and  served  for  two  years 
as  chief  signal  officer  of  the  navy,  at  Washington.  Com- 
missioned as  rear-admiral  August,  1873,  and  at  once  was 
ordered  to  the  command  of  the  U.  S.  naval  forces  in  the 
Pacific.  While  at  Panama,  in  October,  1873,  a  serious 
revolution  occurred.  The  city  of  Panama  and  the  Panama 
Railroad  were  in  imminent  danger  of  being  destroyed. 
Admiral  Almy  landed  a  force  of  men,  under  competent 
officers,  and  afforded  efficient  protection  to  European  as 
well  as  American  citizens,  and  preserved  the  communi- 
cation intact.  At  that  time  he  had  only  the  "  Pensacola" 
and  the  "  Benicia"  at  hand,  in  Panama.  Passengers, 
freight,  and  specie  passed  over  the  road  without  molesta- 
tion ;  and,  when  quiet  was  restored,  Rear-Admiral  Almy 
received  the  thanks  of  the  Panama  Company,  the  Pacific 
Mail  Company,  and  of  all  the  consuls  and  the  foreign 
merchants  at  Panama.  In  1875,  while  in  command  of 
the  Pacific  Squadron,  Rear-Admiral  Almy  was  presented 
by  his  Majesty  King  Kalakaua,  of  the  Hawaiian  Islands, 
with  the  Order  of  King  Kamehameha  I  ,  in  apprecia- 
tion of  courtesies  and  attentions  bestowed  upon  his 
Majesty  during  his  journey  to  the  United  States,  when 
the  king  and  his  suite  were  conveyed  to  and  fro  in  ves- 
sels of  the  squadron  under  the  rear-admiral's  command. 
Rear-Admiral  Almy  returned  from  his  command  of  nearly 
three  years,  in  the  Pacific,  in  July,  1870.  In  April,  1877, 
he  was  retired,  under  the  operation  of  law. 

He  performed,  altogether,  twenty-seven  years  and  ten 
months  sea-service, — the  largest  amount,  up  to  this  time, 
credited  to  any  officer  of  the  navy.  His  shore  or  other 
duty  was  fourteen  years  and  eight  months. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


CAPTAIN   LUTHER   S.   AMES. 

Captain  Luther  S.  AMEs(Second  Infantry)  was  born  in 
Plattsburgh,  New  York,  and  entered  the  volunteer  service 
during  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  serving  as  private,  quar- 
termaster-sergeant, and  sergeant-major  from  September, 
1 86 1 ,  to  December,  1S63,  participating  in  the  campaigns 
of  the  Army  of  the  West,  and  was  engaged  in  the  capture 
of  New  Madrid,  Island  No.  10,  and  Corinth,  Mississippi, 
and  the  pursuit  of  the  rebel  General  Beauregard  ;  also  the 
battles  of  Iukaand  Corinth,  Mississippi,  October,  1862. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  and  made  regimental 
quartermaster  of  the  Sixty-fourth  Illinois  Infantry,  De- 
cember 10,  1863.  He  was  also  acting  adjutant  of  his 
regiment  during  the  Atlanta  campaign,  and  was  engaged 
in  the  battles  of  Resaca,  Dallas,  Kenesaw  Mountain, 
Nickajack  Creek,  Georgia,  and  those  in  front  of  Atlanta 
of  the  22d  and  28th  of  July,  1864. 

He  was  promoted  captain  of  his  regiment  July  17, 
1864,  and  participated  in  the  Atlanta  campaign,  being 
engaged  in  the  battle  of  Jonesboro',  Georgia,  the  capture 
of  Atlanta,  and  the  pursuit  of  the  rebel  General  Hood 
into  Northern  Alabama.  He  also  participated  in  General 
Sherman's  "  March  to  the  Sea,"  and  the  Carolina  cam- 
paigns, being  engaged  at  Pocotaligo,  Salkehatchie  River, 
and  the  capture  of  Columbia,  South  Carolina,  in  February, 
1865. 

Captain  Ames  performed  the  duties  of  acting  assistant 
adjutant-general  of  the  First  Brigade,  First  Division, 
Seventeenth  Army  Corps,  from  February,  1 865, and  was 
in  the  engagements  at  Cheraw,  South  Carolina,  Benton- 
ville,  North  Carolina,  and  the  capture  of  Goldsboro'  and 
Raleigh,  North  Carolina,  and  present  at  the  surrender  of 
the  rebel  General  Johnston  and  his  arm}'.  He  accom- 
panied the  troops  on  the  march  from  Raleigh  to  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  participating  in  the  grand  review  at  that 
place  in  May,  1865.  He  then  occupied  the  position  of 
commissary  of  subsistence  of  the  First  Division,  Seven- 
teenth Corps,  to  Jul}-  1  1,  1865,  when  he  was  honorably 
mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service,  at  Louisville, 
Kentucky. 

Captain  Ames  was  appointed  to  the  regular  service  as 
a  second  lieutenant  of  the  Sixteenth  Infantry,  to  date 
from  May  11,  1866,  but  did  not  accept  the  same  until 


October  13,  1866,  when  he  joined  his  regiment  and 
served  as  acting  assistant  quartermaster  and  acting  com- 
missary of  subsistence  at  Augusta,  Georgia,  until  October, 
1867.  He  was  employed  in  Georgia,  Alabama,  and 
Florida  during  "  reconstruction,"  and  was  transferred, 
upon  the  consolidation  of  regiments,  to  the  Second  In- 
fantry April  17,  1869.  He  was  promoted  first  lieu- 
tenant March  18,  1872,  and  was  ordered  with  his  regi- 
ment to  the  Department  of  the  Columbia  in  July,  1877. 
While  there  he  served  as  acting  assistant  quartermaster 
and  acting  commissar}'  of  subsistence  at  Fort  Coeur 
d'Alene,  Idaho,  building  the  post,  from  January  to  Octo- 
ber, 1879.  Being  transferred  to  Fort  Spokane,  Washing- 
ton, he  performed  the  same  staff  duties,  and  was  engaged 
in  the  construction  of  that  post  from  November,  1882, 
to  April,  1885.  He  then  commanded  a  company  and  the 
post  of  Fort  Townsend,  Washington,  from  August  to 
November,  1885. 

Captain  Ames's  regiment  was  transferred  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Platte  in  July,  1886,  and  was  stationed  at 
Omaha,  Nebraska.  While  serving  there  he  participated 
in  the  Sioux  campaign  in  South  Dakota  during  the 
winter  of  1890-91.  He  was  promoted  captain  February 
27,  1887,  and  detailed  on  general  recruiting  service  at 
Albany,  New  York,  from  October  1,  1891,  at  which 
place  he  is  at  present  on  duty. 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL   DANlhL   AMMF.N.  U.S.N. 

Rear-Admiral  Daniel  Ammen  comes  from  Swiss 
lineage,  but  his  ancestors  emigrated  to  tin's  country  sev- 
eral generations  ago.  His  parents  went  from  Botetourt 
County,  Virginia, to  Brown  County,  <  >hio,  in  1816.  The 
subject  of  this  sketch  was  there  born  May  15,  1820,  and 
entered  the  navy  as  a  midshipman  in  1836.  In  his  book, 
"The  Old  Navy  and  the  New,"  he  gives  some  amusing 
reminiscences  of  his  first  experiences,  so  different  from 
the  present  day  when  the  Naval  School  moulds  all  into 
one  form,  at  least  externally. 

Ammen  served  through  the  various  grades  to  rear- 
admiral,  and  retired  in  1878,  by  request,  under  the  act 
authorizing  such  a  step  after  forty  years  or  more  of 
consecutive  service.  1  lis  foreign  service  was  in  the  Gulf 
of  Mexico;  on  the  coast  of  Labrador;  in  the  Mediter- 
ranean; on  the  survey  of  the  river  Paraguay;  on  the 
coast  of  Brazil ;  on  the  Pacific  station, — anil  twice  on  the 
Asiatic  station, — making  twenty-one  years  afloat. 

In  his  long  service  Admiral  Ammen  has  passed  through 
many  exciting  and  memorable  scenes.  During  the  civil 
war  he  was  executive  officer  of  the  frigate  "  Roanoke;" 
commanded  the  "Seneca"  in  the  fight  at  Port  Royal  ;  at 
Tybee  Island  ;  commanded  at  Port  Royal  Ferry  ;  in  the 
expedition  against  Fernandina.  Commander,  February 
21,  1863.  Commanded  monitor  "  Patapsco"  against  Fort 
McAllister,  and  attack  on  Sumter  of  April  7,  1S63. 

In  May,  1864,  Commander  Ammen  sailed  for  the 
Isthmus  of  Panama  in  the  California  passenger  steamer 
"  Ocean  Queen"  with  a  draft  of  two  hundred  and  twenty 
seamen  for  the  Pacific  station.  An  organized  mutiny  by 
these  men  occurred  on  board  a  steamer  with  women  and 
children  on  board,  and  a  full  passenger-list;  but  Com- 
mander Ammen,  assisted  by  Boatswain  Bell,  the  only  aid 
assigned  him,  and  with  the  excellent  co-operation  of  the 
captain  of  the  "  ( )cean  Queen,"  Tinklepaugh,  put  a  sudden 
stop  to  the  business.      Commander  Ammen    shot   one  of 


the  leading  mutineers,  and  another  was  killed  by  his 
assistants  in  the  repression  of  the  mutiny.  At  the  close 
of  the  civil  war  Captain  Ammen  designed  the  "Ammen 
balsa,"  for  landing  troops  and  field  artillery  on  exposed 
beaches,  and  also  a  life-raft  for  steamers.  As  Chief  of 
the  Bureau  of  Navigation  he  had  a  signal-book  com- 
piled, of  great  excellence;  and  promoted  the  use  of  the 
dynamometer  of  Sir  William  Thomson,  improved  by  the 
present  Admiral  Belknap,  which,  with  the  use  of  wire, 
instead  of  hemp,  enabled  correct  soundings  to  be  made 
in  the  deepest  seas.  Some  years  ago  a  Naval  Advisory 
Hoard  recommended  the  adoption  of  Admiral  Ammen's 
plans  and  calculations  for  a  marine  ram,  and,  under  a 
recent  appropriation,  one  is  now  read)-  for  launching,  at 
Path,  Maine.  When  President  Grant,  in  1872,  appointed 
a  commission  to  examine  into,  and  report  upon,  Isthmian 
Canal  matters,  Ammen  was  made  the  junior  member. 
The  committee  reported  in  1876,  quite  satisfied  that  the 
Nicaragua  Canal  route  was  preferable  to  any  other. 
Further  developments  have  only  served  to  increase  the 
estimate  of  its  commercial  value,  and  in  regard  to  its 
economic  maintenance.  Under  instructions  from  Presi- 
dent Hayes,  Ammen  attended  the  (so-called)  Paris  Canal 
Congress,  in  May,  1879,  a  report  of  the  proceedings  of 
which  he  made  to  the  State  Department.  In  1880  he 
wrote  an  article  on  the  Panama  Canal,  which  was  pub- 
lished in  the  North  American  Review,  contesting  the  po- 
sition of  M.  de  Lesseps  in  his  article  upon  the  subject 
in  the  previous  number.  The  correctness  of  Ammen's 
assertions  time  has  established.  In  January,  1890,  Ad- 
miral Ammen  visited  Nicaragua,  and  was  received  there, 
by  all  parties  and  persons,  with  distinguished  attention. 
In  all  his  exertions  in  behalf  of  the  construction  of  the 
canal  there,  he  has  endeavored  to  secure  a  rigid  and  honest 
management,  and  to  protect  both  the  government  and  the 
canal  company  against  stock-gamblers  and  other  persons 
disposed  to  make  prey  of  it.  Admiral  Ammen  is  the  au- 
thor of"  The  Atlantic  Coast  during  the  Civil  War"  (Serib- 
ner's  War  Series),  ami  "  The  Old  Navy  and  the  New"  (Lip- 
pincott,  Philadelphia),  which  is  a  history  of  the  progressive 
changes  in  naval  architecture,  armament,  and  propulsion 
during  the  past  half-century.  It  has  an  appendix  con- 
taining a  number  of  most  interesting  letters  from  General 
Grant,  written  while  the  latter  was  making  the  tour  of  the 
world.  Admiral  Ammen  and  General  Grant  were  neigh- 
bors in  boyhood,  and  always  remained  friends,  widely  as 
their  paths  in  life  diverged.  When  mere  lads,  Ammen 
saved  Grant  from  drowning,  and,  years  after,  General 
Grant,  in  writing  to  Ammen  from  Nice,  December,  1877, 
speaks  of  the  incident,  saying,  jocosely,  "...  you  res- 
cued me  from  a  watery  grave.  I  am  of  a  forgiving  nature, 
however,  and  forgive  you, — but  is  the  feeling  universal  ? 
If  the  Democrats  get  into  full  power,  may  they  not  hold 
you  responsible  ?  " 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


CAPTAIN  JOHN  ANDERSON. 

Captain  John  Anderson  (Eighteenth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Monson,  Massachusetts,  and  entered  the  military 
service  as  a  private  in  Company  E,  of  the  First  Michigan 
Sharpshooters,  January  5,  1863,  serving  with  that  regi- 
ment until  appointed  a  second  lieutenant  of  the  Fifty- 
seventh  Massachusetts  Volunteers,  when  his  regiment 
was  attached  to  the  First  Brigade,  First  Division  of  the 
Ninth  Army  Corps,  participating  in  the  campaign  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  commanded  Company  E  of 
his  regiment  through  the  Wilderness  campaign,  engaging 
in  the  battles  of  the  Wilderness,  Spottsylvania,  North 
Anna  River,  Cold  Harbor,  and  in  the  charge  upon  the 
rebel  works  around  Petersburg,  Virginia,  June  16-18, 
1864.  He  then  served  in  the  trenches  before  Petersburg 
during  the  siege,  and  participated  in  the  Mine  Explosion, 
July  30,  1864,  where  he  was  wounded. 

He  was  discharged  for  disability  arising  from  his 
wounds,  January  21,  1865,  but  was  appointed  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Twentieth  Regiment  of  the  Veteran 
Reserve  Corps,  March  25,  1865,  serving  at  Wheeling, 
West  Virginia,  in  connection  with  mustering  out  West 
Virginia  volunteers  to  November,  1865,  and  in  Tennessee, 
Georgia,  and  South  Carolina  during  "  reconstruction," 
until  honorably  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service,  ; 
June  30,  1866. 

He  was  brevetted  a  first  lieutenant  of  volunteers,  March 
13th,  1865,  for  gallant  ami  meritorious  services  in  the 
battles  before  Petersburg,  and  a  captain  of  the  same  date 
for  the  same  occasion. 

Captain  Anderson  entered  the  regular  service  by  ap- 
pointment as  second  lieutenant  of  the  Twenty-fifth  U.  S. 
Infantry,  August  IO,  1867,  and  served  as  quartermaster 
and  commissary  at  Columbia,  Newberry,  and  Greenville, 


South  Carolina,  and  was  transferred  to  the  Eighteenth 
Infantry,  April  26,  1869.  He  was  promoted  first  lieu- 
tenant, October  17,  1878,  and  served  in  his  regiment 
until  April,  1879,  when  he  moved  with  it  to  Fort  Assin- 
aboine,  Montana,  participating  in  the  campaign  in  North- 
ern Montana  against  Sioux  Indians  under  Sitting  Bull 
and  Gall,  during  the  months  of  January  and  February, 
1881.  His  regiment  was  transferred  to  the  Indian  Terri- 
tory in  [885,  and  while  on  duty  at  Fort  Gibson  he  was 
made  regimental  quartermaster,  to  date  from  November, 
1889. 

The  regiment  subsequently  moved  to  Texas,  and  he 
was  stationed  with  the  head-quarters  at  Fort  Clark  until 
promoted  a  captain,  June  21,  1890,  when  he  was  relieved 
as  quartermaster  and  joined  his  company. 


IO 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   XAVY  [Regular) 


BRIGADIER  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL 
ROBERT  ANDERSON. 

Brigadier  and  Brevet  Major-General  Robert  An- 
derson (deceased)  was  born  in  Kentucky,  and  graduated 

at  the  Military  Academy,  July  i,  1825.  He  was  pro- 
moted brevet  second  lieutenant  and  second  lieutenant 
Third  Artillery  the  same  day.  lie  served  as  private 
secretary  to  the  U.  S.  Minister  Plenipotentiary  and  Envoy 
Extraordinary  to  the  Republic  of  Columbia  from  October, 
1825,  to  July,  1826,  when  he  was  ordered  to  the  Artillery 
School  at  Fort  Monroe,  remaining  there  until  1828,  and 
on  ordnance  duty  to  May  9,  1832.  He  was  then  ap- 
pointed colonel  of  staff  (assistant  inspector-general)  of 
Illinois  volunteers,  and  was  in  the  campaign  against  the 
Sac  Indians,  under  Black  Hawk,  being  engaged  in  the 
battle  of  Bad  Axe,  August  2,  1832.  He  was  promoted 
first  lieutenant,  June  30,  1833,  and  was  in  garrison  at 
Fort  Constitution,  New  Hampshire,  until  1  S 3 5 ,  when  he 
was  detailed  at  the  Military  Academy,  as  assistant  in- 
structor of  artillery,  to  December,  1835,  and  instructor  of 
artillery  to  November  6,  1 837. 

Lieutenant  Anderson  participated  in  the  Florida  War 
against  the  Seminole  Indians  in  1837-38,  and  was  engaged 
in  the  action  of  Locha-Hatchee,  January  24.  capture  of 
forty-five  Indians  near  Fort  Lauderdale  (in  command), 
April  2,  and  skirmish  in  the  Everglades,  April  24,  1838, 
for  which  services  he  was  brevetted  captain. 

Captain  Anderson  served  in  the  Cherokee  Nation,  as 
aide-de-camp  to  Major-General  Scott,  from  May  to  July, 
1838,  while  emigrating  the  Indians  to  the  West.  I  le  was 
brevet  captain  of  staff  (assistant  adjutant-general),  from 
July  7,  [838,  to  November  30,  1841,  and  served  as 
such  in  the  eastern  department.  He  was  promoted  cap- 
tain Third  Artillery,  October  23,  1841,  and  was  on  a 
board  of  officers  to  examine  his  translation  of  "  Instruc- 


tions for  Field- Artillery"  to  1845,  and  then  was  stationed 
in  South  Carolina  and  Florida  until  the  commencement  of 
the  war  with  Mexico,  in  which  he  participated,  and  was 
engaged  in  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz,  battle  of  Cerro  Gordo, 
skirmish  of  Amazoque,  and  battle  of  Molino  del  Rey, 
September  8,  1S47,  where  he  was  severely  wounded  in 
the  assault  of  the  enemy's  work's,  and  on  account  of 
wounds  was  granted  sick-leave  until  1848,  when  we  find 
him  on  duty  at  Fort  Preble,  Maine.  He  was  a  member 
of  a  board  of  officers,  in  1849-51,  to  devise  "A  Com- 
plete System  of  Instruction  for  Siege,  Garrison,  Sea-coast, 
ami  Mountain  Artillery,"  which  was  adopted  Ma)-  IO, 
185  1,  for  the  service  of  the  United  States. 

Captain  Anderson  was  brevetted  major,  for  "  gallant 
and  meritorious  conduct  in  the  battle  of  Molino  del  Rey, 
Mexico."  He  was  governor  of  the  Harrodsburg  Branch 
Military  Asylum,  Kentucky,  in  1853-54;  member  ofboard 
for  the  armament  of  fortifications,  1854-55  ;  inspector  of 
iron-work  manufactured  at  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  for  pub- 
lic buildings  constructed  under  the  Treasury  Department, 
1855-59;  member  of  a  board  to  arrange  the  programme 
of  instruction  at  the  Artillery  School  for  Practice  at  Fort 
Monroe,  Virginia,  in  1859-60,  and  of  the  commission 
created  to  examine  into  the  organization,  system  of  dis- 
cipline, and  course  of  instruction  at  the  Military  Academy, 
to  December  13,  i860,  when  he  was  ordered,  as  major 
of  the  First  Artillery,  to  the  command  of  the  defences 
of  Charleston  Harbor,  South  Carolina. 

At  the  commencement  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion, 
Major  Anderson  transferred  his  garrison  from  Fort  Moul- 
trie to  Fort  Sumter,  which  was  the  first  point  of  attack 
by  the  rebels,  April  13,  1861.  He  sustained  a  heavy 
bombardment  of  the  work,  whose  walls  were  crushed, 
interior  buildings  and  quarters  burned,  and  was  so  dis- 
mantled as  to  compel  him  to  evacuate  it.  He  was  made 
brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army,  May  15,  1861,  and  placed 
in  command  of  the  Department  of  Kentucky,  and  subse- 
quently of  the  Department  of  the  Cumberland,  which  he 
retained  until  October  8,  1861.  He  was  then  on  waiting 
orders  until  1S63,  when  he  was  given  command  of  Fort 
Adams,  Rhode  Island,  and  on  the  27th  of  October,  1S63, 
he  was  retired  from  active  service,  for  disability  resulting 
from  long  and  faithful  service,  and  wounds  and  disease 
contracted  in  the  line  of  duty. 

General  Anderson  was  brevetted  major-general  U.  S. 
Army,  February  3,  1865,  for  "gallant  and  meritorious 
service  in  defence  of  Fort  Sumter,  South  Carolina." 

General  Anderson  served,  alter  being  retired,  on  the 
staff  of  the  general  commanding  the  Department  of  the 
F.ast,  and  died  October  26,  1S71. 

General  Anderson  translated  from  the  French  "  Instruc- 
tions for  Field-Artillery,  Horse  and  Foot,"  for  the  ser- 
vice of  the  United  States,  in  1840  ;  and  "  Evolutions  of 
Field-Batteries,"  i860. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


\  i 


COLONEL  THOMAS  M.  ANDERSON. 

Colonel  Thomas  M.  Anderson  (Fourteenth  Infantry) 
was  born  in  Ohio,  January  21,  1836.  At  the  commence- 
ment of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  he  entered  the  military 
service  as  private  of  Company  A,  Sixth  Ohio  Infantry, 
April  20,  1861.  He  was  discharged  May  15,  1861,  to 
accept  the  appointment  of  second  lieutenant  in  the  Second 
U.  S.  Cavalry,  to  date  from  May  7,  1861,  but  was  in  the 
mean  time  appointed  a  captain  in  the  Twelfth  U.  S.  Infantry, 
to  date  from  May  14,  1861,  which  latter  appointment, 
however,  he  did  not  accept  until  October  8,  1861.  He 
was  in  the  field  with  Pope's  army  and  participated  in  the 
Cedar  Mountain  and  second  Bull  Run  campaigns,  and 
was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Cedar  Mountain  and  second 
Bull  Run  ;  in  the  Maryland  campaign,  and  engaged  in  the 
battle  of  Antietam,  Maryland ;  in  the  Rappahannock 
campaign,  and  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Fredericksburg 
and  Chancellorsville,  Virginia ;  in  the  Wilderness  cam- 
paign of  1864,  commanding  the  Twelfth  Infantry,  and 
engaged  in  the  battles  of  the  Wilderness,  Laurel  Hill, 
and  Spottsylvania  Court-House,  Virginia,  at  which  latter 
place  he  was  severely  wounded  and  compelled  to  leave 
the  field. 

Upon  his  recovery  for  light  duty,  Colonel  Anderson 
was  occupied  in  organizing  the  First  Battalion  of  the  In- 
valid Corps.  He  also  organized  and  mustered  into  ser- 
vice several  regiments  from  rebel  prisoners,  known  as 
the  repentant  rebel  regiments,  and  mustered  out  sixteen 
thousand  paroled  prisoners  at  Camp  Chase,  Ohio. 

At  the  conclusion  of  the  war,  he  was  brevetted  major, 
August  1,  1864,  "for  gallant  service  in  the  battle  of  the 
Wilderness;"  lieutenant-colonel,  August  1,  1864,  "for 
gallant  services  in  the  battle  of  Spottsylvania." 

When  the  army  was  reorganized  in  1866,  Colonel 
Anderson  was  transferred  to  the  Twenty-first  Infantry, 
and  was  promoted  major,  March  26,  1S6S.  He  was  then 
ordered  to  Texas,  and  served  at  Fort  Mcintosh  and  Ring- 
gold Barracks,  from  August,  1869,  to  September,  1872, 
during  which  time  he  acted  as  attorney  for  the  United 
States  in  the  Mexican  cattle-claims  cases  on  the  Rio  Grande. 
In  1872  he  was  ordered  to  Vicksburg,  Mississippi,  and 
while  there  was  disbursing  officer  for  the  United  States 
until  1874. 

In  the  consolidation  of  regiments  in  1869,  Colonel 
Anderson  was  unassigned  from  March  15  to  June  24, 
1869,  when  he  was  assigned  to  the  Tenth   Infantry,  and 


was  second  in  command  during  MacKenzie's  Kiowa 
campaign,  in  1874.  He  was  in  command  of  Fort  Mc- 
Kavett  in  1876,  and  of  the  Tenth  Infantry  in  1877-7S. 
He  was  then  ordered  on  general  recruiting  service  as 
commandant  of  Columbus  Barracks,  Ohio,  where  he 
remained  until  October,  1880. 

Having  been  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Ninth 
Infantry,  March  20,  1879,  he  joined  that  regiment  in 
Nebraska,  and  was  in  command  of  it  from  February,  1882, 
to  June,  1883,  at  which  time  he  was  ordered  to  Fort  Mc- 
Kinney,  Wyoming,  serving  at  that  post,  as  well  as  at 
Forts  Russell  and  Bridger,  to  1885.  He  was  then  ordered 
in  command  of  a  battalion  of  the  Ninth  Infantry  to  Cris- 
field,  Kansas,  in  the  summer  of  1885,  at  a  prospective 
outbreak  of  Indians  in  the  Indian  Territory.  Colonel 
Anderson  was  also  on  an  expedition,  sent  to  Evanston, 
Union  Pacific  Railroad,  to  protect  Chinamen,  during 
September  and  October  of  that  year. 

He  was  promoted  colonel  of  the  Fourteenth  Infantry, 
September  6,  18S6,  and  joined  his  regiment  at  Vancouver 
Barracks,  Washington,  where  he  has  held  station  to  the 
present  time. 

Colonel  Anderson  is  the  grandson  of  Brigadier-General 
Duncan  McArthur,  second  in  command  to  General  Har- 
rison in  the  Army  of  the  Northwest  during  the  war  of 
1812;  his  other  grandfather  was  a  lieutenant-colonel  in 
the  Continental  army.  He  is,  himself,  the  nephew  of 
General  Robert  Anderson,  of  Fort  Sumter  fame. 


12 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  [regular) 


COLONEL  GEORGE   LIPPITT  ANDREWS. 

Colonel  George  Lippitt  Andrews  (Twenty-fifth  In- 
fantry) was  born  in  Rhode  Island,  April  22,  [828.  He 
was  a  private  in  the  Fifth  Ward  City  Guards  at  Provi- 
dence, Rhode  Island,  during  Dorr's  Rebellion  of  1842, 
and  a  private  in  the  Providence  Marine  Corps  of  Artillery 
in  1S44.  He  became  a  sergeant  in  the  same  in  1847, 
major  fn>m  1N4N  t,.  [852,  and  colonel  (commandant) from 
1853  to  1856.  He  was  then  made  captain  and  commis- 
sary of  the  Second  Brigade,  Rhode  Island  militia,  which 
he  retained  until  appointed  captain  and  quartermaster  of 
the  same  troops.  Removing  to  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  he 
entered  the  militia  service  there  as  captain  of  Company 
P,  Engineer  Battalion,  in  1S60,  and  engaged  in  the 
Southwest  expedition. 

At  the  commencement  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion, 
Captain  Andrews,  as  a  militia  officer  of  the  State  of  Mis- 
souri, was  censured  by  the  then  governor  of  that  State 
(Jackson)  and  the  general  of  the  First  Military  District 
for  his  fealty  to  the  Union  in  preference  to  the  State,  "  in 
case  of  a  conflict  between  the  State  of  Missouri  and  said 
government,"  which  was  considered  "to  amount  to  mili- 
tary insubordination  in  advance,  and  to  be  inconsistent 
with  the  law,"  to  which  Captain  Andrews  replied,  under 
date  of  February  12,  1 86 1 ,  as  follows  : 

"Finding  my  name  has  been  brought  to  the  notice 
of  the  public  in  a  manner  calculated  to  increase  the 
bitterness  of  feeling  now  existing,  and  in  the  hope  that 
positive  information  will  do  less  harm  than  uncertain 
speculation,  I  herewith  enclose  copies  of  documents  re- 
ceived by  me  on  the  I  ith  instant,  with  the  request  that 
they  may  find  a  place  in  the  columns  of  your  paper. 

"  I  do  not  believe  in  mental  reservations  or  quibbles  of 
any  description,  particularly  in  connection  with  taking 
an  oath;  and  when   I  swore  to  '  honestly  and  faithfully 


serve  the  State  of  Missouri  against  all  her  enemies,  and 
that  you  will  do  your  utmost  to  sustain  the  Constitution 
and  laws  of  the  United  States,  and  of  this  State,  against 
all  violence  of  whatever  kind  and  description;  and  you 
do  further  swear  that  you  will  well  and  truly  execute  and 
obey  the  legal  orders  of  all  officers  properly  placed  over 
you,  whilst  on  duty  ;  so  help  you  God,' — I  did  so  in  good 
faith,  with  a  full,  realizing  sense  of  the  moral  and  consti- 
tutional obligations  I  assumed.  I  still  occupy  the  same 
position,  and  shall  ever  be  found  read}-  and  willing  to  do 
my  p. irt  to  sustain  '  the  Constitution,  the  Union,  and  the 
enforcement  of  the  laws. 

"  Respectfully  yours, 

"  Geo.  L.  Andrews. 

"St.  Louis,  February  12,  1861." 

Captain  Andrews  was  appointed  lieutenant-colonel  of 
the  First  Missouri  Infantry,  April  24,  1861,  and  was  en- 
gaged at  Camp  Jackson,  Booneville  (of  which  he  was 
military  governor),  Dug  Spring,  and  McCullough's 
Store;  and  commanded  the  Second  Brigade  of  General 
Lyon's  column  at  the  battle  of  Wilson's  Creek,  where  he 
was  wounded  and  his  horse  shot  under  him.  He  was 
appointed  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  First  Missouri  Light 
Artillery,  September  1,  1861,  and  was  discharged  from  the 
volunteer  service  September  5,  of  the  same  year,  to  enter 
the  regular  service, — he  having  been  appointed  major  of 
the  Seventeenth  U.  S.  Infantry  May  14,  but  did  not  receive 
the  appointment  until  September  5.  He  joined  his  regi- 
ment at  Fort  Preble,  Maine,  where  he  remained  until 
March,  1862,  when  he  was  ordered  to  the  field  with  the 
Arm_\-  of  the  Potomac,  and  his  regiment  became  part  of 
the  Second  Brigade,  Second  Division  (regular)  of  the 
Fifth  Arm}-  Corps.  He  participated  in  the  operations 
and  campaigns  of  the  Arm}-  of  the  Potomac  of  1862-63, 
and  was  engaged  at  the  siege  of  Yorktown,  battles  of 
Gaines'  Mill,  Malvern  Hill,  Second  Bull  Run,  Antietam, 
reconnoissances  across  the  Potomac  River  below  Sharps- 
burg,  to  Leetown,  Snicker's  Gap,  battle  of  Fredericks- 
burg, where  he  commanded  the  Second  Brigade  of  reg- 
ular infantry,  and  battle  of  Chancellorsville,  Virginia. 
He  was  then  ordered  on  regimental  recruiting  service  at 
Fort  Preble,  Maine,  and  subsequently  changed  to  New- 
port Barracks,  Kentucky,  October  14,  1864,  on  being 
promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Thirteenth  Infantry. 

Colonel  Andrews  received  the  brevets  of  lieutenant- 
colonel  for  Second  Bull  Run  and  colonel  for  Antietam, 
"  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services,"  and  was  promoted 
colonel  of  the  Twenty-fifth  Infantry,  January  1,  1871. 

Since  the  close  of  the  war  he  has  been  stationed  in 
various  parts  of  the  country  with  his  regiment,  experi- 
encing all  the  details  of  frontier  life,  such  as  falls  to  the 
lot  of  an  army  officer.  His  present  station  is  with  his 
regiment  at  Fort  Missoula.   Montana. 


I 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


13 


COLONEL  ABRAHAM  K.  ARNOLD. 

Colonel  Abraham  K.  Arnold  (First  Cavalry)  was 
born  in  Pennsylvania,  March  24,  1837.  Retiring  year, 
1901  ;  graduated  from  U.  S.  Military  Academy,  July  1, 
1859.  Actual  Rank. — Brevet  second  lieutenant  Fifth 
(old  Second)  Cavalry,  July  1,  1859;  second  lieutenant, 
June  28,  i860;  first  lieutenant,  April  6,  1861  ;  captain, 
July  17,  1S62  ;  major  Sixth  Cavalry,  June  22,  1869;  lieu- 
tenant-colonel First  Cavalry,  June  II,  1886,  and  colonel, 
February  7,  1891.  Brevet  Ran/:. — Brevet  captain,  June 
27,  1862,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  service  in  the  battle 
of  Gaines'  Mill,  Virginia;  brevet  major,  May  6,  1864,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  service  at  the  battle  of  Todd's  Tav- 
ern, Virginia.  Honorably  Mentioned. — In  the  "  Records  of 
the  Rebellion,"  Tart  I.,  Vol.  XL,  pp.  6S4,  86,  88,  691,  92, 
711,  12,  and  1007  ;  Part  II.,  Vol.  XL,  page  47,  as  far  as 
published.  Service. — In  i860  conducted  a  detachment  of 
recruits  from  New  York  by  sea  to  Indianola  ;  marched  by 
way  of  San  Antonio  to  Fort  Inge,  Texas  ;  joined  Decem- 
ber 2,  in  the  field,  1S61  ;  marched  from  Fort  Inge,  March 
19,  i86i,for  sea-coast;  embarked  at  Indianola,  on  steam- 
ship "Empire  City,"  just  in  time  to  escape  capture,  and 
sailed  for  New  York ;  served  in  the  defences  of  Wash- 
ington and  in  the  field  during  the  winter  of  1 861  and 
iS62,  until  wounded  at  Gaines'  Mill,  which  disabled  him 
from  service  until  September,  1862  ;  appointed  mustering 
and  disbursing  officer  at  New  York  and  Boston  until  Sep- 
tember, 1863;  in  the  field  1863  and  1864 ;  assistant  in- 
structor of  cavalry  tactics  at  LT.  S.  Military  Academy  from 
August  23,  1864,  to  August  2S,  1869;  served  at  Fort 
Brown  and  Waco,  and  at  Fort  Richardson,  Texas,  and  in 
Kansas  from  June  18,  1 870,  until  September,  1872,  on 
garrison  and  field  duties;  appointed  a  disbursing  officer 
in  the  Freedmen's  Bureau  and  served  at  New  Orleans, 
Louisiana,  until  November,  1S78;  on  duty  in  the  West 
and  South,  part  of  the  time  in  the  field,  from  1879  to  1892. 
Staff  Positions  Occupied. — Adjutant,  assistant  commissary 
of  subsistence,  acting  assistant  quartermaster  at  Fort  Inge, 
Texas,  winter  and  spring  of  1 S60-6 1  ;  adj  utant  of  his  regi- 
ment June  I,  1 86 1  ;  resigned  May  9,  1862;  acting  in- 
spector-general Department  of  Arizona  from  November, 
1 8S0,  to  August  2,  1884;  acting  assistant  adjutant-general 
in  the  field  during  the  Cibicu  campaign  of  1 88 1.  Battles. 
Skirmishes,  Etc. — Operations  against  hostile  Indians  in 
Texas,  winter  and  spring  of  1860-61  ;  participated  in 
General  Patterson's  Shenandoah  campaign  ;  was  engaged 
in  the  action  at  Falling  Waters,  and  in  the  skirmishes  near  ! 
Martinsburg  and  Bunker  Hill ;  in  the  defences  of  Wash- 
ington during  the  winter  of  1861-62  ;  participated  in  the 
Manassas  and  Virginia  Peninsula  campaigns,  and  engaged 
in  the  siege  of  Yorktown,  the  battle  of  Williamsburg,  and 
almost  daily  skirmishes  during  the  advance  towards  Rich- 
mond ;  engaged  with  the  enemy  at  the  Hanover  Court- 


House  ;  participated  in  the  reconnoissance  towards  Ash- 
land; severely  wounded  in  the  disastrous  charge  at 
Gaines'  Mill  ;  engaged  in  the  combat  at  Bristoe  Station, 
the  operations  at  Mine  Run,  in  the  raid  and  action  at 
Charlottesville,  the  action  at  Stannardsville,  the  skirmish 
near  Morton's  Ford,  the  battle  of  Todd's  Tavern  and 
Meadow  Bridge,  the  skirmish  near  Mechanicsville,  the 
battles  of  Cold  Harbor  and  Trevilian  Station;  and 
marched  to  the  relief  of  General  Wilson  at  Ream's  Sta- 
tion, when  that  officer  made  his  raid  on  the  South  Side 
Railroad.  Commanding  field  operations  in  Southeastern 
Arizona  against  hostile  Apaches,  raiding  in  New  Mexico, 
spring  of  1S79;  served  with  an  expedition  into  old 
Mexico,  in  the  neighborhood  of  Lake  Guzman,  and  co- 
operated with  the  forces  in  New  Mexico  and  Mexican 
troops,  which  resulted  in  destroying  a  large  band  of  sav- 
ages', until  October,  1879;  in  the  field  during  the  Cibicu 
campaign  in  Arizona,  1 881;  against  the  disaffected 
Crows,  November,  1887,  in  combat  which  resulted  in 
killing  their  chief  and  bringing  them  to  terms.  Com- 
mands Held. — Commanded  company  during  the  last  tour 
of  field  service  performed  in  Texas  by  any  part  of  regi- 
ment, 1861  ;  in  command  of  company  May  9,  1862;  in 
command  of  the  regiment  almost  continuously  from  Oc- 
tober 12,  1863,  to  July  24,  1864;  in  command  of  field 
operations  in  Southeastern  Arizona  from  the  spring  until 
October,  1879;  Fort  Grant,  Arizona,  until  November, 
1880;  Fort  Bayard,  New  Mexico,  and  regiment  until 
April  17,  1885  ;  battalion  of  regiment  in  the  field, 
November,  1 887;  post  of  Fort  Maginnis,  Montana, 
November  1,  188S,  to  March  4,  1889;  Fort  Custer,  Mon- 
tana, and  First  Cavalry,  until  September  25,  1889.  His- 
tory.— Grandson  of  Captain  P.  P.  Walter,  Thirty-second 
U.  S.  Infantry,  War  of  1812,  and  grandson  of  Peter 
Arnold,  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  War. 


14 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY   recvlar, 


MAJI  >K    ISAAC  ARNOLD.  JR. 

Major  Isaac  Arnold,  Jr.,  (Ordnance  Department) 
was  born  in  Connecticut  and  graduated  from  the  Military 
Academy,  June  17,  1862.  He  was  promoted  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Second  Artillery  the  same  date  and 
was  assigned  to  Battery  F.  He  joined  Batten-  K,  Fourth 
Artillery,  at  Harrison's  Landing,  Virginia,  and  served 
with  the  same  in  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  until  after 
the  battle  of  Chancellorsville,  and  was  present  at  the  fol- 
lowing engagements:  Second  Malvern  Hill,  Chantilly, 
Fredericksburg,  and  Chancellorsville,  and  was  wounded 
at  the  latter  place. 

He  was  transferred  to  the  Ordnance  Corps,  April   27, 


1863.  but  did  not  receive  notice  of  transfer  until  after 
the  battle  of  Chancellorsville.  Having  been  promoted 
first  lieutenant,  April  27,  1S63,  he  served  at  Washing- 
ton Arsenal,  District  of  Columbia,  until  about  January 
1.  1S64.  when  he  was  transferred  to  St.  Louis  Arsenal, 
Missouri.  From  that  point  he  was  detached  in  the 
spring  of  1864  anil  sent  to  Springfield,  Illinois,  to  arm  the 
one-hundred-day  men.  After  three  or  four  months  he- 
was  relieved  from  that  duty  and  ordered  to  Hilton  Head. 
South  Carolina,  where  he  served  as  chief  ordnance 
officer  of  the  Department  of  the  South  until  the  close 
of  the  war. 

Lieutenant  Arnold  served  a  short  time  as  assistant 
at  Allegheny  Arsenal,  Pennsylvania,  and  was  then  as- 
signed to  the  command  of  the  San  Antonio  Arsenal, 
Texas,  and  chief  ordnance  officer  of  the  Department 
of  Texas  ;  was  promoted  captain  of  ordnance,  March  7, 
1S67.  From  Texas  he  was  ordered  to  Springfield 
Armory,  Massachusetts,  as  an  assistant,  and  moved 
from  there  to  Allegheny  Arsenal,  Pennsylvania.  He 
then  took  six  months'  leave  of  absence,  mi  expiration  of 
which  he  was  ordered  to  Benicia  Arsenal,  California; 
being  promoted  major  of  ordnance,  May  29,  1879,  he 
was  ordered  to  Indianapolis  Arsenal,  where  he  remained 
about  eight  years,  and  was  then  sent  to  command 
San  Antonio  Arsenal,  Texas,  and  was  chief  ordnance 
officer,  Department  of  Texas,  per  S.  O.  236  and  261, 
respectively,  H.  O.  A.  1SS3.  rem. lining  there  four  years; 
he  was  then  sent  to  Fort  Monroe  Arsenal,  Virginia,  per 
S.  (  ).  223,  II.  Q.  A.  1S87,  where  he  was  stationed  fortwo 
years,  and  then  assumed  command  of  Columbia  Arsenal, 
December  1,  1889,  per  S.  O.  272,  H.  Q.  A.  iSSy,  where 
he  is  at  present. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


15 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL   AND   BREVET    MAJOR- 
GENERAL   CHRISTOPHER   C.    AUGUR. 

Brigadier-General  and  Brevet  Major-General 
Christopher  C.  Augur  was  born  in  Kendall,  Orleans 
Count}',  New  York,  July  10,  1  <S 2 1 .  His  father  dying 
when  he  was  young,  he  went  with  his  mother,  in  1835, 
to  friends  in  Michigan,  and  in  1839  was  appointed  a 
cadet  to  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  from  that  State. 
Graduated  in  1843,  and  assigned  a  brevet  second  lieutenant 
to  the  Second  Infantry.  Served  in  that  regiment  until 
September,  1849,  when  promoted  second  lieutenant  to 
Fourth  Infantry,  then  serving  with  the  "  Army  of  Occupa- 
tion," commanded  by  General  Zachary  Taylor,  at  Corpus 
Christi,  Texas.  Went  with  that  army  to  the  Rio  Grande, 
and  participated  in  all  its  operations,  including  battles  of 
Palo  Alto  and  Resaca  de  la  Palma,  and  the  capture  and 
occupation  of  Matamoras,  Mexico.  Two  companies  of 
each  regiment  were  here  broken  up,  including  his  own 
company,  and  the  officers  sent  North,  recruiting.  In 
March,  1847,  he  returned  to  Mexico  as  aide-de-camp  to 
General  I  lopping.  After  that  general's  death  went  to  the 
City  of  Mexico  as  aide-de-camp  to  General  dishing,  and 
served  with  him  until  the  end  of  the  war.  Then  joined  his 
regiment  at  Pascagoula,  Mississippi,  and  went  with  it  to 
Fort  Niagara,  New  York.  Remained  there  until  July, 
1852,  when  ordered  with  regiment  to  Pacific  coast.  Pro- 
moted to  captain  in  August,  1852.  Stationed  at  Fort  Van- 
couver until  February,  1856.  Was  in  campaign  against 
Yakima  Indians  in  fall  of  1855.  In  February,  1S56,  went 
to  Port  Orford,  Oregon,  against  Rogue  River  and  other  hos- 
tile Indians  in  that  vicinity.  Engaged  with  Indians  at  Big 
Bend  of  Rogue  River,  and  at  Macanootney  Hill.  After 
campaign  closed  took  first  detachment  of  Indians  by  sea 
to  Siletz  Reservation.  Established  Fort  Hoskins,  Kings 
Valley,  Oregon,  in  1856.  Commanded  that  post  until 
July  1,  861 ,  when  ordered  with  company  to  California. 
At  San  Francisco,  found  himself  a  major  in  the  Thirteenth 
Infantry.  Arrived  in  New  York,  he  found  orders  sending 
him  to  West  Point  as  commandant  of  cadets.  Novem- 
ber 14,  1 861,  was  appointed  a  brigadier-general  of  volun- 
teers. Joined  new  brigade  in  McDowell's  division  in 
Washington,  D.  C.  Moved  to  front  with  Army  of  Po- 
tomac in  March,  1862.  Brought  up  at  Catlett's  Station, 
Virginia.  In  April,  1862,  was  sent  with  his  brigade  to 
capture  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  April  19,  1862.  Was 
successful.  In  July  promoted  to  division  in  Banks's  corps 
operating  about  Little  Washington,  Virginia.  Was  in 
battle  of  Cedar  Mountain,  Virginia,  August  9,  1862, 
where  he  was  severely  wounded.  Was  brevetted  a  colonel 
in  the  regular  army,  and  appointed  a  major-general  of 
volunteers  for  this  battle.  When  able  for  duty,  was  put 
on  court  of  inquiry  to  investigate  surrender  of  Harper's 


Ferry.  Then  applied  for  orders  for  the  field,  and  was  sent 
to  report  to  General  McClellan,  then  with  his  army  at 
Warrenton,  Virginia,  and  was  assigned  to  command  First 
Division  First  Army  Corps.  Received  orders  next  day  to 
report  to  General  Banks.  Accompanied  him  to  New 
Orleans,  and  commanded  district  of  Baton  Rouge  until 
advance  upon  Port  Hudson.  During  siege  commanded 
left  wing  of  army.  After  surrender  of  Port  Hudson, 
went  North  on  sick  leave  in  Jul)',  1 863.  Was  made  presi- 
dent of  military  commission  in  Washington,  D.  C.  While 
on  that  duty  was  assigned  temporarily  to  command  of 
the  Department  of  Washington  and  Twenty-second  Army 
Corps  in  October,  1863.  Remained  in  that  command 
until  August,  1866.  In  September,  1866,  appointed  presi- 
dent of  board  to  examine  newly-appointed  officers.  Jan- 
uary, 1867,  was  assigned  to  command  of  Department  of 
the  Platte,  and  remained  there  until  assigned  to  command 
of  Department  of  Texas  in  December,  1871,  having  in 
March,  1869,  been  appointed  a  brigadier-general  in  the 
regular  service.  Commanded  the  Department  of  Texas 
until  March,  1S75,  when  assigned  to  command  Depart- 
ment of  Gulf,  at  New  Orleans.  Commanded  there  until 
July,  1878,  when  that  department  was  consolidated  with 
Department  of  the  South.  Was  assigned  to  command 
that  department,  head-quarters  at  Newport,  Kentucky. 
Commanded  that  department  until  December,  18S0,  when 
again  assigned  to  command  Department  of  Texas.  In 
October,  1883,  was  assigned  to  command  Department  of 
Missouri,  head-quarters  at  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas. 
Commanded  that  department  until  July  10,  1883,  when  re- 
tired for  age,  after  commanding  important  military  de- 
partments continuously  for  twenty-two  years,  with  the 
exception  of  four  months.  Since  retirement  has  resided 
in  Washington,  D.  C. 


i6 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND    NAVY  regular) 


CAPTAIN  WILLIAM  AUMAN. 

Captain  William  Auman  (Thirteenth  Infantry)  was 
born  October  17,  1838,  in  Berks  Count}-,  Pennsylvania. 
His  father,  Henry  Auman,  who  was  a  non-commissioned 
officer  in  a  Pennsylvania  regiment  in  the  war  of  1812-14, 
removed  to  Union  County,  Pennsylvania,  and  again 
moved  to  Pottsville,  in  1848.  At  the  age  of  eighteen 
Captain  Auman  entered  a  general  merchandise  store  in 
Pottsville  as  salesman,  and  continued  in  this  occupation 
until  the  call  of  President  Lincoln  for  troops  in  1861, 
when  he  joined  a  local  militia  company  (Washington  Artil- 
lery), which  had  tendered  its  services  to  the  government. 
The  company  left  Pottsville  on  the  17th  of  April,  1S61, 
and  arrived  at  Harrisburg  that  evening.  Early  the  next 
morning  that  company,  with  four  others  from  the  State, 
were  sworn  into  the  service  of  the  United  States,  and  left 
immediately  (unarmed)  for  the  national  capital.  At  Bal- 
timore these  troops  were  surrounded  by  a  howling  mob 
of  Secessionists.  Tin  eats  and  insults  were  heaped  upon 
them,  and  some  were  injured  by  being  struck  with  stones 
while  marching  through  the  streets.  But  as  the  mob 
was  not  organized,  these  unarmed  troops  managed  to  get 
through  without  loss  of  life,  and  arrived  at  Washington 
that  evening,  where  they  were  temporarily  quartered  in 
tile  Capitol  building.     This  was  the  day  before  the  Sixth 


Massachusetts  had  their  fight  in  Baltimore.  After  serv- 
ing at  Washington  City  and  Fort  Washington,  Mary- 
land, until  July  29,  1861,  Company  H,  Twenty-fifth 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  of  which  Captain  Auman  was 
a  member,  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  service.  But 
on  the  gth  of  September,  1861,  he  enlisted  in  Company 
G,  Forty-eighth  Pennsylvania  Infantry,  and  was  ap- 
pointed a  corporal  same  date.  He  was  promoted  ser- 
geant in  the  summer  of  1S62,  second  lieutenant  of  his 
company  June  2S,  1864,  first  lieutenant  July  2^,  1S64, 
and  captain  March  3.  1865  ;  and  was  brevetted  captain 
of  U.  S.  Volunteers,  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services 
before  Petersburg,  Virginia." 

Captain  Auman  participated  with  his  regiment  in  the 
battles  of  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  Campbell's  Station. 
Blue  Springs,  and  siege  of  Knoxville,  Tennessee.  He 
was  also  engaged  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness,  Spottsyl- 
vania,  Tolepotomy,  Bethesda  Church,  North  Anna,  Cold 
Harbor,  ami  seven  of  the  battles  around  Petersburg. 

At  the  capture  of  Petersburg,  April  2,  1865,  while  on 
the  enemy's  works,  he  was  severely  wounded  in  the  face, 
having  all  the  teeth  on  the  left  side  of  his  upper  jaw  shot 
.  away,  and  his  tongue  so  severely  cut  that  he  was  unable 
to  take  any  food  for  a  number  of  days.  ( )n  the  eleventh 
day  after  he  was  wounded,  a  portion  of  the  bullet  was 
removed  from  his  tongue.  As  soon  as  this  was  done  he 
recovered  rapidly,  and  soon  afterwards  he  rejoined  his 
regiment,  and  was  mustered  out  with  his  company,  July 
17,  1865. 

For  his  services  in  the  war  he  was,  on  the  I  Ith  of  May, 
1866,  commissioned  second  lieutenant  of  the  Thirteenth 
■  U.  S.  Infantry;  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  October  5, 
1 868,  and  captain  March  26,  1879. 

During  a  demonstration  made  by  Crow  Indians  on  the 
post  of  Camp  Cook',  Montana,  May  17,  1868,  he  was 
severely  wounded  in  the  left  foot.  He  served  as  regi- 
mental quartermaster  from  January  1,  1870,  to  August 
1,  1871. 

Captain  Auman's  service  in  the  West  has  carried  him 
to  many  different  stations,  his  present  one  being  Fort 
Supply,  Indian  Territory. 

He  received  a  medal  of  honor  from  the  State  of  Penn- 
sylvania for  service  as  "  First  Defender  of  the  National 
Capital,  1 86 1." 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIV  IE    WAR. 


CAPTAIN   AND  BREVET   MAJOR-GENERAL 
WM.  W.  AVERELL, 

Captain  and  Brevet  M  ajor-General  Wm.  W. 
Avekell  (retired)  was  born  in  New  York  and  graduated 
from  the  Military  Academy  July  i,  1855.  He  was 
promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Mounted 
Rifles  same  day,  and  served  at  Jefferson  Barracks, 
Missouri,  until  1856,  when  lie  was  ordered  to  the  School 
fir  Practice  at  Carlisle,  Pennsylvania,  having  been  pro- 
moted second  lieutenant  Mounted  Riflemen  May  1, 
1856.  In  1857  he  was  on  frontier  duty,  in  command  ol 
an  escort  to  the  commanding  general  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  New  Mexico,  and  the  same  year  was  scouting, 
from  Fort  Craig,  and  engaged  in  a  skirmish  with  Kiowa 
Indians  near  Fort  Craig,  December  7,  1S57.  He  was  on 
the  Navajo  expedition  in  1858,  ami  engaged  in  a  skirmish 
in  Chusca  Valley,  September  29;  a  skirmish  with  Kya- 
tano's  band,  October  I  ;  and  skirmish  at  the  Puerco  of 
the  West,  October  8,  1858,  where  he  was  severely 
wounded  in  a  night  attack  on  the  soldiers'  camp.  He 
was  at  Fort  Craig  until  granted  a  sick  leave,  which  sepa- 
rated him  from  his  duties  until  1861. 

Lieutenant  Averell  was  bearer  of  despatches  to  Colonel 
Emory,  at  Fort  Arbuckle,  Indian  Territory,  April  and 
May,  1 861,  and  on  returning  to  Washington  he  was  then 
promoted  first  lieutenant  Third  Cavalry.  He  was  de- 
tailed on  mustering  duty  at  Elmira,  New  York',  to  July, 
when  he  was  made  acting  assistant  adjutant-general  oi 
General  A.  Porter,  at  Washington,  participating  in  the 
Manassas  campaign,  and  engaged  at  the  battle  of  First 
Bull  Run,  July  21,  1S61. 

Having  been  appointed  colonel  of  the  Third  Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry,  August  13,  1861,  he  was  in  command  oi 
a  cavalry  brigade  in  front  of  the  defences  of  Washington 
(which  was  the  first  cavalry  brigade  of  the  war)  to  March, 
1862,  when  he  led  the  advance  on  Manassas,  and  subse- 
quently participated  in  the  Peninsula  campaign,  being 
engaged  in  the  siege  of  Yorktown,  battles  of  Williams 
burg,  Fair  Oaks,  Malvern  Hill,  where  he  commanded 
the  rear  guard  (see  "Battles  and  Leaders  of  the  War"), 
and  skirmishes  at  Sycamore  Church,  August  2,  and  at 
White  Oak  Swamp,  August  5,  1862.  On  the  17th  of 
July,  1862,  he  was  promoted  captain  Third  Cavalry. 

Appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers  September 
26,  1862.  He  was  engaged  in  scouting  and  skirmishing 
on  the  Upper  Potomac  until  the  31st  of  October,  when 
he  participated  in  the  march  back  to  the  Rappahannock 
River,  being  engaged,  en  route,  in  skirmishes  along  the 
Blue  Ridge,  at  Upperville,  Markam,  Corbins'  and  Gaines' 
Cross  Roads,  and  Amissville.  lie  then  participated  in 
the  Rappahannock  campaign  of  1862-63,  and  was  en- 
gaged in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg,  and  as  com- 
mander of  the  Second  Cavalry  Division  in  the  skirmish 
3 


at  I  [artwood  Church,  action  at  Kelly's  Ford,  the  first  con- 
siderable cavalry  battles  of  the  war.  lie  commanded 
one  of  the  two  di\  isions  of  cavalry  engaged  in  the  Stone- 
man  raid,  and  drove  the  enemy's  cavalry  towards  Gor- 
donsville,  while  Buford  with  Stoneman  reached  the 
enemy's  rear. 

General  Averell  was  placed  in  command  of  the 
Fourth  Separate  Brigade  May  16,  1863,  and  commanded 
in  all  the  engagements  of  the  brigade,  which  was  increased 
to  a  division  of  three  brigades  cavalry  and  one  infantry, 
in  the  West  Virginia  operations,  defeating  the  intrenched 
rebel  army  o(  West  Virginia  at  Droop  Mountain,  and 
driving  the  enemy  out  of  the  State.  In  the  winter  of 
1863-64  he  made  the  raid  to  the  Tennessee  Railroad, 
destroying  it  and  General  Longstreet's  supplies,  from 
December  8  to  25,  1X63.  He  was  in  the  West  Virginia 
operations,  commanding  the  Second  Cavalry  Division, 
in  1X64,  commanding  in  all  the  actions  and  combats, 
raids  and  skirmishes,  and  defeated  Ramseur's  division 
at  Carter's  Farm,  July  20.  He  fought  the  combats  at 
Winchester  and  Moorfield,  and  skirmishes  at  Bunker 
Hill  and  Martinsburg,  and  participated  in  the  battles  of 
Opequan  and  Fisher's  Hill,  and  action  at  Mount  Jackson, 
September  23,  1864. 

He  was  brevetted  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services, 
as  follows:  Major,  for  the  battle  of  Kelly's  Ford,  Vir- 
ginia; lieutenant-colonel,  for  the  action  at  Droop  Moun- 
tain, Virginia;  colonel,  for  the  Salem  expedition  in  Vir- 
ginia; brigadier-general,  for  the  field  during  the  war  of 
the  Rebellion;  major-general,  for  the  battle  of  Moor- 
field, Virginia.  General  Averell  resigned  from  the  army 
May  18,  1865,  and  was  appointed  United  States  Consul- 
General  to  British  North  America  at  Montreal  in  1866. 
By  act  of  Congress  of  August  1,  18S8,  he  was  restored 
to  his  grade  of  captain  in  the  arm)-  and  placed  upon  the 
I  retired  list,  August  17  of  that  year. 


1 8 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  {regular) 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL   R<  >BERT   AVERY 
(retired). 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Robert  Avery  was  born  in 
Tunkhannock,  Pennsylvania,  September  22,  1839-  In 
September,  1861,  he  received  authority  from  the  gov- 
ernor of  New  York  to  raise  a  company,  and  in  October, 
1861,  he  was  commissioned  a  captain  of  New  York  vol- 
unteers in  the  service  of  the  United  States,  afterwards 
assigned  first  to  the  Twelfth,  and  then  to  the  One 
Hundred  and  Second  Regiment  of  New  York  Volun- 
teers, in  which  regiment  he  was  the  senior  captain,  and 
frequently,  for  considerable  periods,  commanded  his 
regiment.  In  December,  1862,  he  was  promoted  to  be 
lieutenant-colonel  of  his  regiment. 

He  participated  in  the  battle  of  Cedar  Mountain 
August  9,  1862;  in  the  battles  of  the  Second  Bull  Run 
campaign  commanded  his  regiment,  and  during  part  of 
the  time,  at  the  battle  of  Chancellorsville,  Virginia,  May 
3,  1863,  his  brigade.  At  this  battle  he  was  wounded 
by  a  musket-ball  in  the  neck  and  lower  jaw,  severing  the 
nerves  on  the  left  side,  causing  partial  paralysis  of  the 
left  side  for  several  months.  He  rejoined  his  command, 
then  a  part  of  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland,  in  Tennes- 
see, in  October,  1863,  having  his  left  shoulder  and  neck- 
bandaged,  leading  the  advance  line  in  the  assault  on 
Lookout  Mountain  November  24,  1863,  where  he  re- 
ceived a  wound  which  necessitated  the  amputation  of 
his  right  leg  close  to  the  hip-joint.     In  this  assault  the 


major  of  the  regiment,  Gilbert  M.  Elliott,  was  killed  by 
his  side.  For  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the 
battles  of  Chancellorsville  and  Lookout  Mountain,  he 
was  brevetted  colonel,  brigadier-general,  and  major- 
general  of  Lmited  States  volunteers. 

In  April,  1865,  he  was  appointed  a  major  in  the 
Veteran  Reserve  Corps,  and  assigned  to  duty  in  Wash- 
ington as  assistant  commissary-general  of  prisoners, 
serving  as  such  under  both  Brevet  Major-General  W. 
Hoffman  and  Major- General  E.  A.  Hitchcock,  and  won 
the  earnest  commendation  of  both  those  officers  for  the 
"prompt,  energetic,  and  able  performance  of  all  the 
duties  devolving  upon  him."  In  July,  1866,  he  was 
assigned  to  duty  as  inspector-general  on  the  staff  of 
Major-General  John  C.  Robinson,  commanding  the  Dis- 
trict of  North  Carolina,  and  assistant  commissioner  of 
the  Freedmen's  Bureau.  He  was  detailed  as  president 
of  an  important  military  commission  and  a  court-martial, 
but,  on  account  of  his  legal  knowledge  and  skill  in  pre- 
senting evidence,  was  soon  made  judge-advocate  of  both 
the  military  commission  and  court-martial.  Before  the 
military  commission  there  were  tried  man)-  important 
cases, — murders,  conspiracies,  arson,  rape,  burglary,  etc., 
— securing  convictions  in  every  case,  winning  the  ap- 
proval and  commendation  of  General  Grant  and  Secre- 
tary Stanton.  On  the  31st  of  December,  1870,  he  was 
placed  upon  the  retired  list,  with  the  rank  of  lieutenant- 
colonel.  General  Hooker,  in  commending  him  to 
Secretary  Stanton  for  promotion,  said,  "  At  the  battle  of 
Lookout  Mountain  his  conduct  was  especially  brilliant, 
as  he  led  the  line  of  skirmishers  along  the  slope  of  the 
mountain,  which  resulted  in  the  glorious  achievement  of 
that  field."  General  George  S.  Greene,  also  commend- 
ing him  for  promotion,  said,  "  Colonel  Avery  was  always 
distinguished  for  gallantry,  intelligence,  and  energy  in 
the  discharge  of  his  duties."  He  was  twice  recom- 
mended for  promotion  for  gallantry  by  General  Grant. 

The  importance  of  General  Avery's  services  in  North 
Carolina  during  the  reconstruction  period  can  hardly  be 
over-estimated.  The  knowledge  that  there  was  one 
court  constantly  open,  with  a  fearless  and  tireless  prose- 
cuting officer,  to  secure  the  conviction  of  criminals,  no 
matter  how  great  their  political  or  social  influence,  soon 
made  North  Carolina  as  safe  and  as  free  from  crime  as 
any  State  in  the  Union.  There  can  be  little  doubt  that 
if  the  administration  of  justice  in  that  State  had  re- 
mained in  General  Avery's  hands,  the  crimes  of  the 
Ku-Klux  Klaus  in  North  Carolina  would  not  have  been 
committed. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


19 


LIKUTENANT-COLONEL   LAWRENCE   S.   BABBITT. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Lawrence  S.  Babbitt  (Ord- 
nance Department,  U.S.A.)  was  born  in  Boston,  Massa- 
chusetts, February  iS,  1S39.  Appointed  cadet-at-large 
at  West  Point  Military  Academy  July,  1857;  graduated 
June,  I S6 1,  and  appointed  second  lieutenant,  Third  Ar- 
tillery, June  24,  1 86 1.  On  October  26,  1861,  he  was 
transferred  to  Ordnance  Department,  and  promoted  to  be 
first  lieutenant  of  ordnance  March  3,  1863,  and  captain 
of  ordnance  December  22,  1866;  major  of  ordnance 
May  10,  1878,  and  lieutenant-colonel  of  ordnance  Sep- 
tember 19,  1890. 

He  was  brevetted  first  lieutenant,  July  21,  1861,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of  Bull  Run, 
Virginia  ;  is  honorably  mentioned  in  "  Records  of  the 
Rebellion,"  series  1,  vol.  ii.,  pp.  312,  348,  380,  382,  and 
in  report  of  Nez  Perces  campaign,  by  General  Howard, 
1877.  Saw  service  in  field  with  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
1861-63.  Took  part  in  Virginia  Peninsula  campaign  as 
assistant  ordnance  officer.  Commanding  Louisville  Ord- 
nance Depot,  1864  and  1865  ;  commanding  Vancouver 
Arsenal,  1865  to  1871  ;  St.  Louis  Arsenal,  1S71  to  1876; 
chief  ordnance  officer  Department  of  Columbia,  1876  to 
1879;  in  Nez  Perces  campaign,  1S77  ;  Bannock  War, 
1878;  commanding  Fortress  Monroe  Arsenal,  1S79  to 
1887;  San  Antonio  Arsenal,  1S87  to  1890 ;  Benicia  Ar- 
senal, 1890  to  present  date.  Staff  Positions  Held. — As- 
sistant ordnance  officer  Army  of  the  Potomac,  1862; 
aide-de-camp,  1868  to  1870;  chief  ordnance  officer  De- 


partment of  Columbia,  1876  to  1879;  chief  ordnance 
officer  Department  of  Texas,  1887  to  1890.  Battles,  Skir- 
mishes, Etc. — Engaged  in  action  at  Blackburn's  Ford, 
July  iS,  1861  ;  battle  of  Bull  Run,  July  21,  1861  ;  siege 
of  Yorktown,  Virginia ;  skirmishes  at  Cottonwood 
Ranch,  Idaho,  July  3,  4,  and  5,  1877  ;  battle  of  the  Clear- 
water, Idaho,  July  12  and  13,  1877;  skirmish  at  Mua- 
tella  Agency,  Oregon,  July  13,  1888.  Colonel  Babbitt 
is  the  son  of  General  E.  B.  Babbitt,  U.S.A.,  deceased, 
who  was  a  graduate  of  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  in 
the  class  of  1827. 


20 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  regular) 


BREVET  MAJOR  AND  CAPTAIN  JOHN  B.  BABCOCK. 

Brevet  Major  and  Captain  John  15.  Babcock  (Fifth 
Cavalry)  was  born  in  New  (  Irleans,  Louisiana,  February 
7,  1843.  Major  Babcock  is  descended  from  an  old  Rhode 
Island  family.  His  great-great-grandfather,  Joshua  Bab- 
cock, was  twice  chief  justice  of  Rhode  Island,  and  major- 
general  of  Rhode  Island  militia  during  the  Revolution. 
Major  Babcock's  great-grandfather,  Henry  Babcock-, 
served  five  campaigns  in  the  French  and  Indian  War. 

During  the  war  he  served  as  second  lieutenant,  first 
lieutenant,  adjutant,  captain,  and  major  of  New  York 
State  volunteers  (One  Hundred  and  Seventy-fourth  and 
One  Hundred  and  Sixty-second  regiments),  and  was 
brevetted  lieutenant-colonel ;  was  present  with  his  regi- 
ment in  the  battles  of  Plain's  Store,  Port  Hudson,  Sabine 
Cross-Roads,  Pleasant  Hill,  Monett's  Bluff,  Mansura 
Plains,  and  Yellow  Bayou,  all  in  Louisiana;  was  with 
his  regiment  under  General  Grant  at  the  siege  of  Peters- 
burg, Virginia,  and  in  the  campaign  of  General  Sheridan 
in  the  Shenandoah  Valley;  was,  at  the  age  of  twenty- 
two,  major  and  acting  adjutant-general  of  the  Military 
District  of  Savannah  and  inspector-general  First  Division, 
Nineteenth  Army  Corps. 

Since  the  war,  for  twenty-five  years,  this  officer  has 
served  continuously  with  his  troop.  For  fifteen  years 
after  the  war,  Captain  Babcock  was  almost  constantly  in 
the  field,  winter  and  summer,  engaged  in  campaigns  of 
the  most  severe  character  against  hostile  Indians. 

The  following  is  a  brief  statement  of  the  campaigns 
and  Indian  fights  in  which  this  officer  has  been  engaged  : 

Continuous  campaign  with  his  regiment,  under  General 
Carr,  against  the  Kiowas  and  Southern  Cheyennes,  last- 
ing from  November,  1868,  to  August,  1869;  without 
leaving  the  field,  marching  from  Kansas  to  Texas  and 
back  to  Nebraska,  through  the  storms  of  a  severe  «  inter, 
driving  the  Indians  eastward  and  fighting  them  at  Bea\  er 
Creek  and  Spring  Creek,  Nebraska,  and  Summit  Springs, 


Colorado.  At  Spring  Creek  his  troop,  then  reduced  to 
thirty-three  men,  was  attacked  by  the  whole  village  of 
Cheyenne  and  Sioux  Indians  under  Tall  Bull.  Captain 
Babcock  defended  the  position  for  two  hours,  until  re- 
lieved by  the  regiment.  At  Summit  Springs  the  regi- 
ment captured  a  camp  of  eighty-six  lodges,  killing 
seventy-two  Indians,  capturing  five  hundred  ponies,  and 
releasing  two  white  women  captives,  and  putting  an  end 
to  the  war  with  these  bands. 

From  November,  1 871,  for  three  years,  Captain  Bab- 
cock served  in  Arizona  under  General  Crook,  and  was 
almost  constantly  in  the  field.  Having  attracted  the 
attention  of  General  Crook  by  successful  hard  service  in 
the  mountains,  he  was  kept  in  the  field  under  general 
instructions  to  hunt  up  hostile  Indians;  was  in  many 
fights  with  Apaches  ;  was  twice  thanked  in  general  or- 
ders,— G.  O.  14  and  G.  O.  24,  Department  of  Arizona. 
1873;  was  wounded  in  the  breast  by  an  arrow,  and 
recommended  for  the  brevets  of  lieutenant-colonel  and 
colonel.  Under  date  of  November  28,  1 S74,  General 
Crook  writes  of  this  officer  as  follows:  "The  official 
records  of  my  department  show  that,  since  his  first 
assignment  to  duty,  Lieutenant  J.  B.  Babcock  has  been 
one  of  the  mi  >st  gallant,  efficient,  and  distinguished  officers 
that  have  ever  served  in  Arizona." 

His  last  service  in  Arizona  was  the  military  control  of 
the  turbulent  Apaches  on  the  San  Carlos  Reservation. 

Going  north  with  his  regiment,  Captain  Babcock  was 
again  in  the  field,  in  Northern  Wyoming,  during  the 
winter  of  1877,  and  again  from  June  to  December,  1S78, 
and  from  January,  1879,  to  the  spring  of  that  year.  In 
the  latter  campaign  the  regiment  marched  through  the 
snows  of  Northern  Nebraska  against  the  Cheyennes. 

In  October,  1879,  the  famous  Ute  outbreak  occurred. 
Captain  Babcock  marched  with  his  troop,  as  part  of  Gen- 
eral Merritt's  command,  one  hundred  and  seventy  miles 
in  sixty-five  hours, — in  time  to  take  part  in  the  relief  of 
Major  Thornburg's  command  and  the  light  that  followed, 
—  remaining  in  the  field  until  December. 

In  18S5  he  marched  six  hundred  miles,  and  took  part  in 
the  protection  of  the  Kansas  border  from  the  threatened 
raids  of  Southern  Cheyennes,  remaining  in  the  field  all 
the  spring  and  until  Jul}-. 

From  1887  to  18S9  Captain  Babcock'  was  assistant 
instructor  in  the  Art  of  War  at  the  L*.  S.  Infantry  and 
Cavalry  School,  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas.  In  the 
summer  of  1889  he  was  adjutant-general  of  the  Camp  of 
Instruction  for  the  troops  in  the  Department  of  Missouri. 

Since  1889  he  has  been  assistant  instructor  in  the 
Department  of  Cavalry  at  the  U.S.  Infantry  and  Cavalry 
School,  which  position  he  now  holds,  in  addition  to  the 
command  of  his  tr<  k  >p. 

He  was  in  the  field  with  his  troop  at  Pine  Ridge 
Agency  during  the  Ghost-Dance  War  last  year. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


21 


COMMODORE  OSCAR   C.  BADGER,  U.  S.  NAVY. 

Commodore  Oscar  C.  Badger  was  forty-three  years 
and  eleven  months  upon  the  active  list  of  the  navy.  In 
this  lengthened  period  he  had  twenty-one  years  and  one 
month  of  sea-service,  and  one  year  and  three  months  in 
vessels  which  were  not  sea-going.  Mis  shore  duty  ex- 
tended to  seventeen  years  and  three  months  ;  and  he  was 
unemployed  four  years  and  four  months.  During  one 
year  and  six  months  of  this  "  unemployed"  time,  he  was 
ill, — unable  to  perform  duty,—  the  result  of  wounds  re- 
ceived in  the  service. 

This  is  a  good  record  for  any  officer. 

Commodore  Badger  was  born  in  the  township  of  Wind- 
ham, Connecticut,  August  12,  1823,  and  was  appointed 
midshipman  from  Pennsylvania,  September,  1841.  He 
served  for  three  years  in  the  old  razee  "Independence," 
in  the  West  Indies  and  Gulf  of  Mexico,  and  was  then 
attached  to  the  "  Saratoga,"  on  the  west  coast  of  Africa. 
Served  in  the  attack  on  the  Bereby  tribes,  when  Com- 
modore Perry  punished  them  for  piracy,  and  was  in  the 
different  landing-parties.  During  the  Mexican  War  he 
Mixed  in  the  steam-frigate  "Mississippi,"  and  was  in  the 
action  at  Alvarado.  He  then  served  on  the  Brazil  Sta- 
tion in  the  frigate  "  Brandywine"  and  the  brig  "  Perry." 
He  was  navigator  of  the  "  Perry,"  which  vessel,  during 
the  cruise,  captured  and  sent  home  three  vessels  engaged 
in  the  slave-trade.  During  this  time  he  became  a  passed 
midshipman.  He  then  served  in  the  Pacific  in  various 
vessels, — "  Supply,"  "  Savannah,"  and  "  Vincennes," — and 
upon  his  return  home  was  in  the  Hydrographic  Depart- 
ment of  the  Naval  Observatory.  Promoted  master  Sep- 
tember 14,  1855,  he  was  made  lieutenant  the  next  day. 
Serving  on  board  the  sloop  "John  Adams,"  in  the 
Pacific,  he  was  navigator,  and  commanded  a  party  from 
that  ship  which  attacked  and  destroyed  the  village  of 
Vutia,  in  the  Feejee  Islands,  on  account  of  the  piratical 
acts  of  its  inhabitants  He  was  also  engaged  in  successful 
skirmishes  with  the  Feejeeans  on  other  occasions.  Lieu- 
tenant Badger  afterwards  served  on  the  experimental 
cruise  of  the  "  Plymouth,"  the  "  Macedonian"  in  the 
Mediterranean,  and  the  flag-ship  "  Minnesota." 

When  the  Civil  War  occurred,  he  commanded  the 
"  Anacostia,"  of  the  Potomac  flotilla,  and  was  in  the 
attack  upon  Cockpit  Point,  Acquia  Creek  batteries,  and 
several  others.  He  led  with  the  "  Anacostia,"  piloting 
the  "  Pensacola,"  under  a  heavy  fire,  past  the  entire  line 
of  batteries,  and  was  favorably  mentioned  in  despatches. 


Tii  the  same  vessel  he  was  employed  at  the  siege  of 
Yorktown  and  Gloucester  Point,  and  especially  men- 
tioned by  General  McClellan  for  his  services  there. 

He  became  a  lieutenant-commander  in  July,  1862,  and 
was  in  charge  of  the  ordnance  for  gunboats  building  on 
the  Western  waters,  1862-63.  After  this,  as  chief  ord- 
nance officer  of  the  South  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron, 
he  was  engaged  against  the  Morris  Island  batteries.  He 
commanded  the  iron-clad  "  Patapsco"  in  the  attack  on 
Fort  Wagner  in  July,  and  on  Forts  Wagner,  Gregg,  and 
Sumter  on  August  17  of  that  year.  On  the  22d  of 
September,  he  commanded  the  "  Montauk,"  in  the  night 
attack  on  Sumter.  Lieutenant-Commander  Badger  was 
appointed  fleet-captain  of  the  squadron  upon  the  death 
of  Commander  George  W.  Rodgers, — killed  in  battle, — 
and  was  serving  in  that  capacity  in  the  night  attack  upon 
Sumter,  when  he  was  dangerously  wounded,  his  right 
leg  being  shattered  by  a  metallic  splinter.  When  he 
had  partially  recovered  he  served  as  inspector  of  ord- 
nance at  Philadelphia,  and  in  the  same  capacity  at  Pitts- 
burg. 

Commander  in  July,  1866;  and,  as  commander  of  the 
"  Peoria,"  received  thanks  from  the  Assemblies  of  An- 
tigua and  St.  Kitt's  for  services  at  the  great  fire  at  Basse- 
Terre.  Upon  his  return,  was  upon  equipment  duty  at 
Portsmouth;  and  from  1S71  to  1S73  commanded  the 
"  Ticonderoga,"  in  the  South  Atlantic. 

Captain,  1872.  Commodore,  1881.  As  commodore 
he  was  commandant  of  the  Boston  Navy- Yard,  1SS2  to 
[885.     Retired,  1885. 


22 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  {regular) 


MAJOR   CLARENCE  MITCHELL  BAILEY. 

Major  Clarence  Mitchell  Bailey  (Fifteenth  Infan- 
try) was  born  in  New  York,  ami  was  appointed  a  second 
lieutenant  in  the  Sixth  U.  S.  Infantry  .August  5,  1S61  ; 
promoted  a  first  lieutenant  July  14,  1863  ;  a  captain  July 
28,  [866;  and  major  July  10,  1891,  and  assigned  to  the 
Fifteenth  U.  S.  Infantry.  His  first  military  duty  was  at 
Newport  Barracks,  Kentucky  where  he  arrived  in  Sep- 
tember, 1861,  and  was  almost  immediately  placed  in 
command  of  Company  A,  permanent  party.  This  posi- 
tion did  not  last  long,  as,  on  the  2ist  of  the  same  month, 
he  was  ordered  on  duty  with  Company  A,  First  li.it- 
talion  Fifteenth  Infantry,  also  directed  to  perform  the 
duties  of  A.  A  0.  M.,  A.  C.  S.,  and  adjutant  of  the  bat- 
talion then  under  orders  to  report  to  General  Robert 
Anderson,  U.  S.  Volunteers,  at  Louisville,  Kentucky. 
Before  leaving  Newport  he  was  given,  on  receipts  and 
invoices,  one  thousand  dollars  quartermaster  and  three 
bundled  dollars  commissary  funds.  Asking  an  officer 
what  he  was  to  do  with  this  money,  he  received  the 
answer,  "  Keep  it  separate,  and  don't  spend  one  fund  in 
payment  of  the  other's  debts." 

He  arrived  in  Louisville,  and  was  ordered  by  General 
Anderson  to  proceed  in  the  direction  of  Elizabethtown, 
and  report  to  General  Sherman,  wherever  he  might  be. 
General  Sherman  was  found  at  Rolling  Forks.  Lieuten- 
ant Bailey  had  provided  the  command  with  two  days' 
fresh  bread,  and  when  he  arrived  at  the  river  the  general 
ordered  rations  issued  ;  and  as  he  desired  the  command  to 
reach  Muldrow's  Hills  as  soon  as  possible,  the  lieutenant 
supposed  he  considered  his  way  of  giving  out  the  bread 
too  slow,  so  the  general  relieved  him  of  this  duty  and  did 
it  himself.  He  would  take  a  loaf  and  toss  it  to  a  man,  say- 
ing, "  Here,  catch  this."     The  lieutenant  hired  wagons  of 


the  farmers,  and  in  due  time  joined  the  battalion  with 
their  tents,  etc.,  etc.  After  being  in  camp  a  few  days  the 
commanding  officer  directed  him  to  buy  a  saddle  and 
bridle  of  a  gentleman  living  near,  and  to  draw  a  horse 
from  the  quartermaster's  department.  All  this  he  did, 
thinking  how  kind  the  commanding  officer  was  about 
his  being  mounted.  Alas,  for  his  hopes!  As  soon  as 
they  changed  camp  the  commanding  officer  directed  his 
servant  to  bring  that  horse  saddled  to  his  tent,  and  in- 
formed the  lieutenant  that  in  future  he  would  use  it.  The 
latter  can  understand  now  the  action  of  the  former,  but 
at  that  time  thought  he  had  been  very  badly  treated. 

The  winter  was  spent  on  Green  River,  Kentucky,  where 
the  Thirty-second  Indiana  Volunteers  had  a  skirmish  with 
some  Texas  cavalry;  some  of  the  Indiana  troops  were 
killed.  The  dirge  played  over  the  graves  of  these  men 
was  the  most  doleful  thing  ever  heard,  and  it  was  thought 
it  had  a  very  depressing  effect.  The  troops  suffered  that 
winter  greatly  from  poorly-cooked  rations,  bad  bread,  etc., 
and  man)- a  man  died  there  who  would  have  lived  longer 
had  the  surroundings  been  different.  The  early  spring 
found  the  battalion  en  route  to  the  Tennessee  River,  going 
to  the  rescue  of  Grant's  army.  In  May  they  occupied 
Corinth,  Mississippi.  The  Fourth  of  July  was  spent  at 
I  Iuntsville,  Alabama.  Shortly  after  the  army  took  up 
the  march  for  Kentucky  ;  reached  Louisville  in  due  time  ; 
got  a  new  outfit,  and  started  back.  The  battalion  got 
a  taste  of  Perrysville,  ami  in  December  went  into  that 
memorable  fight  at  Stone  River,  where  so  man}'  good 
men  gave  up  their  lives. 

Lieutenant  Bailey  was  relieved  from  duty  with  the 
Fifteenth  Infantry  in  1863,  and  joined  his  own  Company 
F,  Sixth  Infantry,  in  Washington  Park,  New  York,  and 
subsequently  spent  the  winter  at  Fort  Hamilton. 

In  Ala}',  1864,  he  was  detailed  as  judge  advocate 
First  Division,  Department  of  the  Hast.  In  May,  1865, 
he  departed  with  his  company  for  the  Department  of  the 
Carolinas,  and  served  on  the  staff  of  Generals  Q.  A. 
Gillmore  and  Chas.  Devens  as  judge  advocate.  He 
was  relieved  by  General  Daniel  Sickels.  In  1869  he  was 
ordered  to  Fort  Gibson,  Idaho  Territory.  He  joined 
the  Eighth  Infantry  by  assignment  in  March,  1 S7 1 ,  at 
David's  Island.  He  spent  the  winter  of  1 871-72  at 
Chicago;  went  to  Utah  in  Ala)',  1872  ;  to  Arizona  in  July, 
1S74;  on  the  Bannock  campaign  in  1878,  and  assigned 
to  command  of  Fort  Bidwell,  California,  the  same  year. 
I  He  was  on  duty  at  Angel  Island  from  September,  1881, 
to  September,  1S84;  then  at  San  Diego  until  January  2, 
1886;  in  Arizona  until  the  following  November ;  then 
to  Fort  Bridger,  Wyoming.  The  next  July  found  him 
at  Fort  Robinson,  Nebraska.  Here  he  remained  until 
March,  l89I,when  he  was  ordered  to  Pine  Ridge,  South 
Dakota,  and  remained  there  until  he  joined  his  new  sta- 
tion, Fort  Sheridan,  Illinois. 


117/0   SERVED   IN   THE    CIVIL    WAR. 


REAR-ADMIRAL   THEODORUS   BAILEY. 

Rear-Admiral  Theodokus  Bailey  was  born  at 
Chateaugay,  New  York,  in  April,  1805.  He  came  of 
good  colonial  stock,  his  grandfather,  John  Bailey, 
being  the  first  to  hoist  the  Revolutionary  flag  in  New 
Yorlc.  He  also  commanded  the  Second  Dutches-, 
County  Regiment. 

Theodorus  Bailey  witnessed  the  battle  of  Plattsburg, 
when  he  was  nine  years  old,  General  Mooers,  a  relative, 
being  engaged  therein.  Appointed  midshipman,  1S18. 
Served  on  the  coast  of  Africa,  the  Pacific,  and  the  West 
Indies.  A  lieutenant  in  1827,  he  made  a  cruise  round 
the  world,  in  the  "  Vincennes."  1  le  was  then  transferred 
to  the  "  Constellation,"  and  made  a  second  cruise  round 
the  world,  being  absent  three  years  and  eight  months. 
In  1S46  Lieutenant  Bailey  commanded  the  store-ship 
"  Lexington,"  on  the  Mexican  and  Californian  coasts. 
A  company  of  artillery  was  taken  out  from  New  York  as 
passengers, — Captain  Tompkins  in  command;  the  late 
General  Sherman,  first  lieutenant  ;  and  the  second  lieu- 
tenant was  General  E.  O.  C.  <  >rd.  General  Hal  leek,  then 
lieutenant  of  engineers,  was  also  a  passenger.  The"  Lex- 
ington" did  good  service  on  the  west  coast,  especially  at 
La  Paz.  She  blockaded  San  Bias,  and  finally  captured 
that  town,  after  a  brisk  fight.  Lieutenant  Bailey  was  made 
commander,  1849.  In  1855  commanded  the"  St.  Mary's," 
in  the  Pacific.  In  the  same  year  was  commissioned  cap- 
tain. A  long  and  useful  cruise  terminated  with  the 
settlement  of  serious  troubles  at  Panama.  In  1861  Cap- 
tain Bailey  was  ordered  to  command  the  "  Colorado," 
joining  Farragut  at  the  mouth  of  the  Mississippi.  It 
was  found  that  the  frigate,  even  if  lightened,  could  not 
cross  the  bar;  so  Captain  Bailey,  although  an  invalid, 
and  against  the  advice  of  the  surgeon,  obtained  permis- 
sion for  himself  and  many  of  his  guns,  men,  and  officers 
to  be  transferred  to  other  lighter  vessels.  Finally  he  ob- 
tained command  of  the  leading  division  in  the  passage 
of  the  forts  below  New  Orleans,  hoisting  his  flag  in  the 
"  Cayuga."  His  part  in  those  events  is  too  well  known 
to  require  repetition.  When  the  fleet  arrived  off  New 
Orleans  he  went,  accompanied  by  Lieutenant  George 
Perkins,  to  demand  an  unconditional  surrender  from  the 
mayor,  a  mission  so  hazardous  as  to  be  quoted  as  one 
of  the  most  gallant  acts  performed  during  the  whole  war. 
The  description  of  their  reception  by  the  mob  of  des- 
peradoes is  most  thrilling,  and  how  those  two  brave  men 
escaped  assassination  will  always  be  a  wonder.  His  con- 
duct as  leader  of  the  first  division  elicited  the  highest 
encomiums  from  both  superiors  and  subordinates,  which 
space  forbids  our  placing  here,  even  in  condensed  terms. 
What  Farragut  thought  of  him  was  shown  by  his  selec- 
tion of  him  to  bear  to  the  government  at  Washington 
the  despatches  and  the  reports  of  the  successful  opera- 


tions. After  his  arrival  at  the  capital,  he  described  upon 
the  floor  of  the  Senate  Chamber  the  capture  of  New 
( (rleans. 

In  June,  1862,  Captain  Bailey  was  ordered  to  com- 
mand the  Last  Gulf  Squadron,  as  acting  rear-admiral. 
He  was  engaged  in  the  important  blockade  of  Florida, 
capturing  prizes,  destroying  the  illicit  traffic  so  exten- 
sively carried  on,  at  that  time,  between  the  Gulf  ports  and 
the  West  Indies,  and  securing  supplies  designed  for  the 
Confederate  service.  Admiral  Porter  remarks:  "The 
command  of  this  station,  although  a  compliment  to  Ad- 
miral Bailey,  was  scarcely  a  reward  commensurate  with 
his  character  and  services.  He  was  not  a  man  whose 
appearance  would  attract  attention,  except  from  those 
who  could  appreciate  the  honest  and  simple  character 
of  our  old-time  naval  officer;  but  he  was  a  man  who  had 
no  superior  in  the  navy  in  point  of  dash,  energy,  and 
courage  ;  and  if  he  had  ever  had  the  opportunity  of  com- 
manding a  fleet  in  action,  he  would  have  done  it  with  the 
coolness  and  bravery  of  Nelson.  No  higher  compliment 
could  be  paid  him." 

When  Farragut  was  preparing  for  his  attack  on  Mobile, 
he  evinced  his  appreciation  of  Bailey  by  offering  him  the 
same  position  he  had  filled  in  the  Mississippi.  Bailey 
accepted  with  enthusiasm,  asking  "  to  be  put  down  for 
two  chances."  But,  unfortunately,  a  severe  attack  of  yel- 
low fever  sent  him  North  before  the  attack  was  made,  and 
he  passed  a  long  convalescence  in  the  peaceful  command 
of  the  old  naval  station  at  Sag  Harbor,  instead  of  leading 
Farragut's  van. 

He  was  made  rear-admiral  in  1866,  and  commanded 
the  navy-yard  at  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  from  1865 
to  1867.  His  last  service  was  as  a  member  of  the  Ex- 
amining Board  at  Washington,  in  which  city  he  died  in 
February,  1877. 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARM)'  AND  NAVY  <  regular) 


BRIGADIER   AND    BREVET    MAJOR-GENERAL    ABSA- 
LOM   BA1RD   (retired). 

Brigadier  and  Brevet  Major-General  Absalom 
Baird  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  August  20,  1824,  and 
graduated  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  July  1,  1S49. 
1  le  was  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Second 
Artillery  the  .same  day,  and  second  lieutenant  of  the 
First  Artillery  April  I,  1S50.  After  serving  at  Fort 
Monroe  and  Fort  Columbus,  he  participated  in  the 
Florida  hostilities  against  the  Seminole  Indians  until 
1S53,  when  he  was  detailed  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Acad- 
emy as  assistant  professor  of  mathematics  until  Sep- 
tember 9,  1856,  when  he  was  made  principal  assistant 
of  the  same  branch.  In  1859-60  he  was  on  frontier 
duty  at  Fort  Brown  and  Ringgold  Barracks,  Texas,  ami 
in  1860-61  in  garrison  at  Fort  Monroe. 

lie  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  December  24,  1S53, 
and  served  in  command  of  a  light  battery  in  the  de- 
fence of  Washington  from  March  10  t<>  May  11,  1861, 
when  he  was  placed  on  duty  as  assistant  in  the  Ad- 
jutant-General's Office  at  Washington  and  brevet  cap- 
tain of  the  staff.  lie  was  adjutant-general  <>f  General 
Tyler's  division  in  the  defence  of  Washington,  and  par- 
ticipated in  the  Manassas  campaign  of  1861,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  action  at  Blackburn's  Ford  and  battle  of 
First  Bull  Run,  July  21  of  that  year.  On  the  3d  of 
August,  1861,  he  was  appointed  captain  and  assistant 
adjutant-general,  and  until  March,  1S62,  was  assistant 
in  the  Adjutant-General's  Department,  and  on  inspection 
duty  in  the  War  Department. 

Captain  Baird  was  appointed  major  and  assistant  in- 
spector-general November  12,  1S61,  and  was  assigned  to 
duty  as  inspector-general  and  chief  of  staff  of  the  Fourth 


Corps  (Army  of  the  Potomac),  participating  in  the  Vir- 
ginia  Peninsula  campaign  of  1862,  being  engaged  in  the 
siege  of  Yorktown,  and  battle  of  Williamsburg.  I  le  was 
appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers  April  28,  1862, 
and  was  in  command  of  the  Seventeenth  Brigade  (Army 
of  the  Ohio)  from  May  to  September,  1862,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  capture  of  Cumberland  Gap,  and  its  occu- 
pation until  evacuated.  Then  he  was  assigned  to  com- 
mand the  Third  Division  (Army  of  Kentucky)  about 
Lexington  ami  Danville,  Kentucky,  to  January,  1S63, 
when  he  participated  in  the  operations  in  Tennessee  in 
1863,  being  engaged  in  the  defence  of  Franklin  and  re- 
pulse of  Van  Dorn's  assault  on  the  place. 

General  Baird  took'  part  in  General  Rosecrans's  Ten- 
nessee campaign  of  1 863,  and  was  in  the  advance  on 
Tullahoma  and  capture  of  Shelbyville.  Crossing  the 
Cumberland  Mountains  and  Tennessee  River,  was  en- 
gaged in  the  action  at  Dug  Gap,  Pigeon  Mountain, 
Georgia ;  battle  of  Chickamauga,  where  he  especially 
distinguished  himself;  skirmish  at  Rossville,  and  oc- 
cupation  of  Chattanooga,    Tennessee,    to    October    10, 

1563.  Lie  was  in  command  of  a  division  of  the  Four- 
teenth Arm)-  Corps  in  the  occupation  and  operations 
about  Chattanooga,  Tennessee,  and  engaged  in  the  battle 
of  Missionary  Ridge,  and  pursuit  of  the  enemy  to  Ring- 
gold. He  made  a  reconnoissance  towards  Dalton, 
Georgia,  skirmishes  at  Tunnel  Hill  April  29  and  May  2, 

1564.  He  pursued  the  enemy  with  constant  skirmishing 
to  May  28,  1864,  and  participated  eventually  in  the 
Atlanta  campaign,  being  engaged  in  all  the  battles  and 
actions  pertaining  to  that  memorable  march,  termi- 
nating with  the  march  through  the  Carolinas  and  the 
surrender  of  the  rebel  army  under  General  Joseph  E. 
Johnston,  at  Durham  Station,  North  Carolina,  April  26, 
1S65. 

General  Baird  was  brevetted  lieutenant-colonel  for 
"  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of  Chicka- 
mauga, Georgia  ;"  colonel  for  the  same,  "  at  the  battle 
of  Chattanooga,  Tennessee  ;"  brigadier-general  for  the 
same,  "in  the  capture  of  Atlanta,  Georgia;"  major-gen- 
eral for  the  same,  "  in  the  field  during  the  Rebellion." 
He  was  also  brevetted  major-general  of  U.  S.  Volunteers 
September  1,  1S64,  for  "faithful  services  and  distin- 
guished conduct  during  the  Atlanta  campaign,  and  par- 
ticularly in  the  battles  of  Resaca  and  fonesborough,  and 
lor  general  good  conduct  in  command  of  his  division 
against  Savannah." 

Alter  the  war  closed,  General  Baird  occupied  man)' 
important  positions  too  numerous  to  mention  here.  He 
filled  the  sever, il  grades  of  major,  lieutenant-colonel,  and 
colonel  in  the  Inspector-General's  Department,  and  was 
appointed  brigadier-general  ( inspector-general j  Septem- 
ber 22,  1885,  and  on  the  20th  of  August,  188S,  was  re- 
tired from  active  service  by  operation  of  law. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  JOHN   W.   BARLOW. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  John  W.  Barlow  (Corps  of 
Engineers)  was  born  in  New  York  June  26,  1838,  and 
graduated  at  the  Military  Academy  May  6,  1861.  He 
was  promoted  second  lieutenant  of  the  Second  Artillery 
same  day;  promoted  first  lieutenant  May  15,  1861,  and 
transferred  to  the  Topographical  Engineers  July  24,  1862. 
He  served  in  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
participating  in  the  Peninsula  campaign  of  1862,  and 
was  engaged  in  the  battles  around  Richmond,  Virginia, 
especially  at  Malvern  Hill,  remaining  with  the  rear-guard 
during  the  movement  of  the  army  to  the  James  River, 
and  the  transfer  of  the  army  to  the  defences  of  Wash- 
ington, D.  C. 

Colonel  Barlow  was  detailed  as  assistant  professor  of 
Mathematics  and  Ethics  at  the  Military  Academy  from 
September,  1862,  to  June  18,  1863,  when  he  was  ordered 
on  duty  with  the  Engineer  Battalion  of  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac  to  February  17,  1S64,  being  engaged  in 
constructing  the  bridge  over  the  Potomac  River  at  Berlin, 
Maryland,  July  18,  1863;  in  laying,  repairing,  and  guard- 
ing bridges  over  the  Rappahannock  River,  August  1-23, 
1863;  over  Bull  Run,  at  Blackburn's  Ford,  October  17, 
1863;  and  across  the  Rappahannock,  at  Kelly's  Ford, 
November  7,  1863.  He  was  engaged  in  the  Mine  Run 
operations  from  November  26  to  December  3,  1863,  and 
in  making  roads  and  reconnoissances,  building  block- 
houses and  erecting  defensive  works. 

Colonel  Barlow  was  again  detailed  as  assistant  pro- 
fessor of  mathematics  at  the  Military  Academy  from 
February  26  to  June  20,  1864.  He  was  promoted  cap- 
tain July  3,  1S63,  and  in  the  summer  of  1864  was  or- 
dered to  the  armies  of  the  West,  participating  in  the 
Georgia  campaign  from  July  12  to  August  27,  1864,  as 
chief  engineer  of  the  Seventeenth  Army  Corps,  and  was 
at  the  latter  date  granted  leave  of  absence  to  November 
13,  1864,  when  he  rejoined,  and  was  placed  in  charge  of 
the  defences  of  Nashville,  Tennessee,  where  he  remained 
until  October,  1865. 

He  participated  in  the  Pennsylvania  campaign,  and  was 
engaged  at  the  battle  of  Gettysburg  ;  and  in  the  Georgia 
campaign,  and  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Atlanta,  July  22, 


1864,  and  siege  of  Atlanta  to  August  27,  1864,  including 
the  repulse  of  the  sortie  of  July  28,  1864. 

He  was  brevetted  captain  May  27,  1862,  for  "  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Hanover  Court- 
House,  Virginia;"  major  July  4,  1864,  for  "gallant  and 
meritorious  services  in  the  Atlanta  campaign  ;"  and  lieu- 
tenant-colonel March  13,  1865,  for  "  gallant  and  merito- 
rious services  in  the  battles  before  Nashville,  Tennessee." 

At  the  close  of  the  war,  Colonel  Barlow  was  detailed 
as  superintending  engineer  of  the  construction  of  Fort 
Clinch,  Florida,  from  October  20,  1865,  to  November 
19,  1867.  He  was  at  this  time  transferred  to  the  same 
duty  at  Burlington,  Vt,  as  Superintending  Engineer  of 
Fort  Montgomery,  New  York,  and  harbor  improvements 
on  Lake  Champlain  to  May  30,  1870.  He  was  pro- 
moted major  of  Engineers  April  23,  1869,  and  lieutenant- 
colonel  March  19,  1884. 

His  duties  as  an  officer  of  Engineers  have  required  his 
services  at  Chicago,  New  London,  Milwaukee,  Chatta- 
nooga, Nashville,  and  other  stations  from  1S70  to  the 
present  time,  he  being  now  employed  as  Commissioner 
and  Engineer-in-Chief  upon  the  relocation  of  the  Inter- 
national Boundary  between  the  United  States  and  Mexico. 


26 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN  AND  BREVET  COLONEL  ALBERT  BARNITZ. 

Captain  axd  Brevet  Colonel  Albert  Barnitz  (re- 
tired) was  born  at  Everett,  Bedford  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, March  10,  1835.  At  the  breaking  out  of  the  war 
of  the  Rebellion  he  was  pursuing  the  study  of  law,  in 
the  office  of  an  eminent  jurist,  at  Minneapolis,  Minne- 
sota, whither  he  had  gone  from  Cleveland,  Ohio,  after 
some  preparatory  study  at  Kenyon  College,  and  in  a 
local  law-school.  But  the  importunate  beating  of  war- 
drums,  and  the  startling  cry,  "  to  arms  !"  caused  him  to 
relinquish  his  cherished  opportunities  and  to  hasten  back- 
to  Cleveland,  where,  waiving  all  claims  to  immediate  pre- 
ferment, he  at  once  enlisted  as  a  private  soldier  in  the 
Second  Ohio  Cavalry,  then  organizing  on  University 
Heights, — but  was  later  enrolled  as  a  sergeant. 

The  regiment  with  which  he  was  now  associated 
had  a  remarkable  and  altogether  exceptional  career.  It 
served  in  five  different  armies,  under  twenty-four  gen- 
erals, and  campaigned  through  thirteen  States  and  the 
Indian  Territory  ;  fought  in  ninety-five  battles  and  minor 
engagements,  and  marched  an  aggregate  distance  of 
twenty-seven  thousand  miles. 

Captain  Barnitz,  meanwhile,  won  his  way,  step  by  step, 
to  the  rank  of  major.  The  command  of  the  regiment, 
however,  devolved  upon  him  at  a  critical  time,  while  he 
yet  held  the  rank  of  captain,  and  throughout  the  entire 
.Appomattox  campaign,  wherein  the  regiment  under  the 
eye  of  Custer,  and  justifying  his  enthusiastic  commen- 
dation, habitually  led  the  charge,  or  bore  the  brunt  of 
onset,  in  every  desperate  crisis ;  and  in  the  battles  of 
Dinwiddie  Court-House,  Five  Forks,  Sailor's  Creek, and 
Appomattox  Station,  well  sustained  its  old  time  prestige, 
and  fought  with  even  more  than  its  accustomed  valor ; 


;'  crowning  its  achievements  by  the  spirited  repulse,  at 
Appomattox  Court-House,  of  the  attempted  sortie  of  a 
confederate  cavalry  brigade,  while  efforts  towards  capitu- 
lation were  in  progress. 

It  is  historically  stated  that  "  from  the  27th  of  March 
to  the  surrender  of  Lee"  (Colonel  Barnitz  being  mean- 
while in  command)  "the  Second  captured,  and  turned 
over  to  the  provost-marshal,  eighteen  pieces  of  artillery, 
one  hundred  and  eighty  horses,  seventy  army  wagons, 
nine  hundred  prisoners,  and  small-arms  not  counted." 

Upon  the  reorganization  of  the  army,  in  1866,  Colonel 
Barnitz  was  commissioned  captain  of  G  Troop,  Seventh 
U.  S.  Cavalry,  and  subsequently  brevetted  major,  lieuten- 
ant-colonel, and  colonel,  in  the  regular  army. 

He  served  with  the  Seventh  Cavalry,  and  in  command 
of  his  troop  and  detachments,  on  independent  scouts 
and  other  expeditions,  in  Indian  campaigns  in  Kansas, 
Colorado,  Texas,  and  the  Indian  Territory  ;  marching 
many  thousand  miles,  and  participating  in  numerous 
engagements  with  the  Cheyennes,  Arapahoes,  Apaches, 
Kiowas,  Comanches,  and  Sioux.  He  was  with  General 
Hancock's  Expedition  on  the  Plains,  in  the  spring  of 
1867,  and  participated  in  the  seizure  and  destruction  of 
the  Cheyenne  village.  He  was  with  General  Sully  in 
pursuit  of  the  hostile  tribes  to  the  border  of  the  Staked 
Plains,  and  in  attendant  engagements  in  1868.  He  ac- 
companied General  Custer  on  the  toilsome  campaign, 
through  blizzards  and  trackless  snow,  which  culminated 
at  the  battle  of  Washita,  Indian  Territory,  November 
2j,  1868,  in  which  engagement  Colonel  Barnitz,  at  day- 
break, led  the  attack  from  below  the  village,  and  later, 
while  separated  from  his  command,  in  an  effort  to  head 
off  a  large  party  of  Indians  escaping  to  their  ponies, 
killed,  in  a  hand-to-hand  encounter,  three  warriors,  by 
one  of  whom  he  had  been  previously  shot  through  the 
body,  just  below  the  heart, — the  wound  being  pro- 
nounced mortal,  at  the  time,  by  the  surgeons  present. 
The  colonel  was  twice  seriously  wounded  during  the  war 
of  the  Rebellion.  lie  was  retired  from  active  service 
December  15,  1870,  and  makes  his  occasional  home  at 
Cleveland,  Ohio.  lie  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1881, 
but  has  never  engaged  in  active  practice  of  the  law,  as 
he  prefers  to  travel  with  his  family,  and  meanwhile  writes 
occasional  letters  for  the  Cleveland  Leader.  He  has 
gained  some  celebrity  as  a  poet,  having  written  several 
war-poems  of  remarkable  vigor,  and  others  not  less  meri- 
torious. His  graphic  war-correspondence  for  the  Cin- 
cinnati Commercial,  over  the  signature  "  A.  B,"  is  still 
favorably  remembered. 

Colonel  Barnitz  is  a  son  of  Dr.  Martin  E.  Barnitz 
and  Martha  McClintic,  of  Chambersburgh,  Pa.,  who 
emigrated  to  Ohio  in  1835.  He  is  also  a  grandson 
of  Captain  John  McClintic,  renowned  in  the  war  of 
1 81 2. 


WHO  SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


27 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  AND  BREVET  BRIGADIER- 
GENERAL  JOHN  W.  BARR1GER. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  and  Brevet  Brigadier-Gen- 
eral John  W.  Barriger  (Assistant  Commissary-General 
of  Subsistence)  was  born  in  Kentucky,  and  appointed  a 
cadet  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy,  from  the  same  State, 
on  the  1st  of  September,  1S52.  He  was  graduated,  and 
appointed  a  second  lieutenant  in  the  Second  U.  S.  Artil- 
lery, July  1,  1856. 

Lieutenant  Barriger  served  at  the  artillery  school  at 
Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  in  1857-59,  anc'  >n  Light  Com- 
pany A,  of  his  regiment,  in  1859-61.  In  May,  1861, 
being  then  on  duty  in  the  defences  of  Washington,  he 
was  assigned  to  the  command  of  Fort  Ellsworth,  the 
principal  earthwork  in  front  of  Alexandria,  Virginia, 
which  he  armed  and  equipped.  He  served  in  the  Man- 
assas campaign  of  July,  1861,  as  first  lieutenant  of  Light 
Company  D,  Second  Artillery,  commanded  by  Captain 
Richard  Arnold,  and  was  engaged  with  his  battery  in 
the  battle  of  Bull  Run,  Virginia,  fought  on  the  2ist  of 
July,  1861,  for  which  he  was  brevetted  captain,  "for  gal- 
lant and  meritorious  services,"  to  date  from  July  21, 
1  Siii.  On  the  3d  of  August,  1 861,  Lieutenant  Barriger 
was  appointed  a  commissar)-  of  subsistence  with  the  rank 
of  captain,  and  ordered  to  Indianapolis,  Indiana,  for  duty  as 
chief  commissary  of  subsistence  for  the  volunteer  troops 
being  raised  in  the  State  of  Indiana.  On  the  30th  of 
November,  1861,  he  was  relieved  from  duty  at  Indian- 
apolis, and  assigned  as  chief  commissary  of  subsistence 
of  the  Department  of  Western  Virginia,  commanded  by 
General   W.   S.   Rosecrans.      From   July   to    November, 

1862,  after  the  discontinuance  of  the  Department  of 
Western  Virginia,  he  was  engaged  in  inspecting  sub- 
sistence depots  in  the  Middle  Department,  and  in  for- 
warding subsistence  stores  from  Baltimore  to  Frederick, 
Maryland,  for  the  use  of  the  Arm}-  of  the  Potomac  during 
the  Antietam  campaign.  In  December,  1862,  he  was 
ordered  to  report  to  General  J.  D.  Cox,  commanding  the 
District  of  West  Virginia,  for  duty  as  chief  commissary 
of  subsistence  of  that  district.  Upon  the  discontinuance 
of  the  District  of  West  Virginia  in  April,  1863,  he  was 
ordered  to  report  to  General  Ambrose  E.  Burnside, 
commanding  the  Department  of  the  Ohio,  for  inspection 
duty.  He  was  engaged  in  inspecting  subsistence  depots 
in  the  States  of  Ohio,  Michigan,  Illinois,  Indiana,  and 
Kentucky  from  April  to  November,  1S63.     In  November, 

1863,  Captain  Barriger  was  appointed  a  commissary  of 
subsistence  of  volunteers  with  the  rank  of  lieutenant- 
colonel,  and  ordered  to  report  to  General  John  G.  Foster, 
at  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  and  accompany  him  to  Knoxville, 
Tennessee,  for  duty  as  chief  commissary  of  subsistence 
of  the  Department  of  the  Ohio.  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Barriger,  upon  arriving  at  Knoxville  in  December, 
1863,  just  after  the  raising  of  the  siege,  found  the  Army 


of  the  Ohio  at  a  distance  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  miles 
from  its  depot  of  supplies,  at  Camp  Nelson,  Kentucky, 
which  was  accessible  by  mountain  wagon-roads  only,  then 
nearly  impassable  for  loaded  wagons.  It  was  quickly  per- 
ceived that  a  better  route  of  transportation  must  speedily 
be  opened  to,  or  the  troops  withdrawn  from,  East  Ten- 
nessee. With  the  view  of  opening  the  route  from  Chat- 
tanooga to  East  Tennessee,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Barriger 
proceeded  to  Chattanooga,  under  the  orders  and  instruc- 
tions of  General  Foster,  for  conference  with  General 
George  H.  Thomas,  commanding  the  Department  and 
Army  of  the  Cumberland.  The  result  of  this  conference 
was  an  early  opening  of  the  railway  to  Loudon,  and  the 
occupancy  of  East  Tennessee  was  thereby  made  possible 
and  permanent.  General  Foster  was  the  1st  of  Febru- 
ary, 1864,  compelled  by  ill  health  to  ask  to  be  relieved  of 
his  command.  He  was  succeeded  by  General  Schofield, 
on  whose  staff  Lieutenant-Colonel  Barriger  served  as 
chief  commissary  of  subsistence  until  the  close  of  the 
Civil  War,  which  found  the  command  in  North  Carolina. 

Since  the  close  of  the  Civil  War,  General  Barriger  has 
performed  duty  as  chief  commissary  of  subsistence  of  the 
Department  of  Platte,  Department  of  South,  and  Depart- 
ment of  Missouri ;  as  purchasing  and  depot  commissary 
of  subsistence  at  Louisville,  Ky.,  Cincinnati,  O.,  Chicago, 
111.,  and  St.  Louis,  Mo. ;  and  for  six  years  as  assistant  to 
the  commissary-general  of  subsistence  at  Washington, 
D.C.  He  attained  his  present  grade — viz.,  assistant  com- 
missary-general of  subsistence,  with  the  rank  of  lieuten- 
ant colonel — March  12,  1892.  In  recognition  of  his  ser- 
vices during  the  Civil  War,  he  received,  in  addition  to  the 
brevet  of  captain  heretofore  mentioned,  the  brevets  of 
major,  lieutenant-colonel,  colonel,  and  brigadier-general. 

General  Barriger  is  the  author  of  "  Legislative  History 
of  the  Subsistence  Department  of  the  United  States 
Army  from  June  15,  1775,  to  August  15,  1876,"  and  is 
a  companion  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion. 


28 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


MAJOR   HENRY   ANTHONY   BARTLETT,   U.S.M.C. 

Major  Henry  Anthony  Bartlett  was  born  in  Paw- 
tuxet,  Rhode  Island,  and  was  appointed  to  the  Marine 
Corps  from  that  State.  He  served  in  the  First  Regi- 
ment Rhode  Island  Volunteers,  under  General  A.  E. 
Burnside;  on  its  being  mustered  out  of  service  he  was 
appointed  a  second  lieutenant  in  the  Marine  Corps  Sep- 
tember 8,  1S61;  Port  Royal  Marine  Battalion,  under 
Major  John  George  Reynolds,  which  left  Washington, 
October  16,  1861,  on  board  the  transport  steamer  "  Gov- 
ernor," which  foundered  at  sea,  November  3,  i86i,off 
the  coast  of  North  Carolina;  all  but  seven  of  the  four 
hundred  marines  were  rescued  by  the  frigate  "Sabine," 
Captain  Cadwalader  Ringgold,  commanding  ;  Fort  Clinch 
and  Fernandina  expedition,  February,  1862;  St.  Augus- 
tine expedition,  March,  1S62. 

Commissioned  first  lieutenant  November  26,  1861; 
stationed  at  marine  barracks,  Boston,  April,  1862,  to 
July,  1862;  commanding  guard  of  the  ironclad  frigate 
"  New  Ironsides,"  from  July,  1S62,  to  August,  1864;  in 
charge  of  after-division  of  two  eleven-inch  guns,  manned 
by  the  marine  guard,  at  bombardment  of  Morris  Island, 
Sumter,  and  Moultrie.  April  7,  1863,  Flag-Officer  DuPont 
aboard  "  Ironsides"  as  his  flagship  ;  in  twenty-six  other 
engagements  with  Forts  Wagner,  Gregg,  Sumter,  Moul- 
trie,  Bee,  and   other   forts   ami   batteries    in    Charleston 


harbor;  commanded  a  battalion  of  three  hundred  and 
twenty  marines  and  one  hundred  and  twenty  sailors  that 
lauded  at  Morris  Island,  Jul)',  1863,  as  a  storming-party ; 
in  command  of  a  battalion  of  marines  on  expedition 
to  St.  John's  River  and  Jacksonville,  February,  1S64; 
marine  barracks,  Brooklyn,  August,  1 864,  to  March,  1 865  ; 
1S64-65,  commanded  troops  and  assisted  the  revenue 
officers  in  breaking  up  whiskey  distilleries;  receiving- 
ship  "  North  Carolina,"  from  March,  1865,  to  Septem- 
ber, 1865  ;  marine  barracks,  Boston,  September,  1865,  to 
March,  1 866  ;  steam  frigate  "  Chattanooga,"  special  cruise, 
March,  1 S66,  to  September,  1866;  steam  sloop  "  Sacra- 
mento," special  cruise,  September,  1866,  to  November, 
1867  ;  aboard  at  the  time  she  was  wrecked  on  the  Coro- 
mandel  coast,  Bay  of  Bengal,  India. 

Commissioned  a  captain  November  29,  1867;  marine 
barracks,  Boston,  December  6,  1867,  to  September,  1868  ; 
fleet  marine  officer  flagship  "  Contoocook,"  September, 
1868,  to  ( )ctober,  1869;  marine  barracks,  Boston,  De- 
cember 6,  1S69.  to  February  4,  1S70;  receiving-ship 
"Vermont,"  February  10,  1870,  to  September  23,  1870; 
special  duty  on  Tehuantepec  surveying  expedition,  under 
command  of  Captain  Shufeldt,  September,  1870,  to  Sep- 
tember, 1 87  i;  receiving-ship  "  Vermont,"  October,  1 87 1, 
to  June,  1872;  fleet  marine  officer  flagship  "  Hartford," 
Asiatic  Station,  October,  1872,  to  October,  1875  ;  judge- 
advocate,  Navy  and  Marine  Corps,  from  November,  1875, 
to  August,  1879;  head-quarters  Marine  Corps,  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  August,  1879,  to  February  26,  1880;  training- 
ship  "  Minnesota,"  March  1,  1880,  to  August  8,  1881; 
commanding  head-quarters  Marine  Corps,  Washington, 
.August  12,  1 88 1,  to  November  21,  1881 ;  special  duty 
Navy  Department,  November,  1881,  to  March,  1882; 
receiving-ship  "  Colorado,"  March,  18S2,  to  September 
1,  1883  ;  fleet  marine  officer  flagship  "  Trenton,"  Asiatic 
Station,  September  1,  1S83,  to  September  22,  1886; 
commanding  marine  barracks,  Norfolk,  Virginia,  January 
1,  1887,  to  April  16,  1887;  commanding  marine  bar- 
racks, Annapolis,  Maryland,  April  20,  1887,  to  April  1, 
1 89 1  ;  graduated  at  the  Torpedo  School,  Newport,  Rhode 
Island,  [888. 

Commissioned  major  January  29,  1891  ;  commanding 
marine  barracks,  League  Island,  from  April  I,  1891,  to 
June,  1 89 1  ;  commanding  marine  barracks,  Mare  Island, 
August  1,  1891. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


29 


MEDICAL-DIRECTOR   NEWTON   L.   BATES. 

Dr.  Bates  was  born  in  New  York,  and  appointee! 
assistant  surgeon  from  that  State  in  July,  1861.  His 
first  service  was  at  the  Naval  Hospital  at  New  York. 
He  then  served  in  the  "  Seneca,"  in  the  South  Atlantic 
Squadron,  in  1861-62. 

He  was  on  duty  at  the  Naval  Laboratory  at  New  York 
in  1862-63.  That  was  then  a  very  busy  place,  and  to  fill 
the  requisitions  required  the  devoted  exertions  of  those 
on  duty  there, — while  it  is  a  kind  of  duty  requisite  for 
the  completeness  of  naval  outfits  which  seldom  receives 
recognition. 

Dr.  Bates  then  went  to  the  Mississippi,  and  served  in 
the  ironclad  "  Benton"  in  1863-64,  partaking  in  her  work 
during  that  time.  He  was  again  stationed  at  the  Naval 
Laboratory  from  1864  to  1867.  He  was  commissioned 
as  surgeon  September,  1865,  and  served  in  the  "  Ports- 
mouth" during  1867-68,  and  the  "  Swatara"  during  1868 
-69.  He  went  directly  to  the  "  Miantonomah,"  and 
served  in  her  in  1869-70.  He  was  attached  to  the 
U.  S.  S.  "Pawnee"  in  1870-71,  and  to  the  navy-yard  at 
Norfolk,  Virginia,  from  1871  to  1873.  He  was  fleet- 
surgeon  on  board  the  flagship  "  Brooklyn,"  of  the  South 
Atlantic  Squadron  (Admiral  Leroy),  from  1873  to  1876. 
For  two  years  after  this  he  was  attached  to  the  "  Min- 
nesota." He  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Examiners, 
187S-80. 

Dr.  Bates  was    made  medical    inspector  in    January, 


1 88 1,  and  was  in  charge  of  the  Naval  Hospital  at  Yoko- 
hama, Japan,  for  some  time  ;  after  which  he  served  in  the 
flagship  "  Lancaster"  as  fleet-surgeon  up  to  1S84. 

Coming  to  the  East  again,  he  was  for  three  years  on 
special  duty  at  Washington,  where  he  made  many  friends 
by  his  skilful  treatment  and  sympathy  with  his  patients. 
He  next  served  in  three  flagships, — the  "  Trenton"  in 
1SS7,  the  "  Richmond"  in  iSSS,  and  the  "  Pensacola"  in 
the  same  year.  He  became  medical  director  in  Septem- 
ber, 1888.  Since  then  he  has  been  in  charge  of  the 
Naval  Hospital  at  Mare  Island,  California. 


30 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   WILLIAM   H.    BECK. 

Captain-  William  H.  Beck  (Tenth  Cavalry)  was 
born  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.  At  the  first  call  for 
troops  by  the  President,  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  war 
of  the  Rebellion,  he  entered  the  volunteer  service  as 
corporal  of  Company  B,  Tenth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry, 
April    [6,  1861,  and  was  honorably  discharged  July  29, 


1 86 1.  He  then  re-entered  the  service  as  quartermaster- 
sergeant  of  the  Sixth  Illinois  Cavalry,  September  21,  1S61, 
and  promoted  first  lieutenant  October  21,  1862. 

He  served  in  the  armies  of  the  West,  in  the  field,  and 
was  engaged  in  action  at  Coldwater,  Mississippi,  October 
21,  1862,  where  he  was  severely  wounded,  and  resigned 
his  volunteer  commission  February  28,  1863. 

Captain  Beck  did  not  again  enter  the  service  during  the 
war,  but  was  appointed  to  the  regular  service,  as  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Tenth  Cavalry,  June  18,  1867,  and  was 
promoted  first  lieutenant  December  11,  [867.  He  served 
in  the  field  in  Mexico  and  Arizona,  participating  in  nu- 
merous campaigns,  and  was  engaged  in  actions  against 
numerous  Apache  Indians  at  Sierra  Carmen,  Mexico, 
November  1,  1877.  He  participated  in  action  with 
Victorio,  at  Tenajos  de  los  Palmos,  Texas,  Jul}-  30, 
[880,  and  also  with  the  same  at  Rattlesnake  Canon, 
August  6,  1880.  He  also  participated  in  the  capture  of 
the  Chiricahua  Indians  at  Fort  Apache,  Arizona,  August 
30,  1886. 

Captain  Beck  performed  the  duties  of  adjutant  of  the 
Sixth  Illinois  Cavalry  from  November  1,  1862,  to  Febru- 
ary 28,  1863,  and  was  acting  assistant  quartermaster  of 
the  district  in  1880.  He  was  promoted  captain  Tenth 
Cavalry  December  23,  1887. 

In  1892  his  regiment  was  ordered  to  the  Department 
of  Dakota,  and  is  now  en  route  to  stations  therein. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


3i 


COLONEL    AND    BREVET    MAJOR-GENERAL    AMOS 

BECKWITH    (RETIRED). 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General  Amos  Beck- 
witii  was  born  in  Vermont  on  the  4th  of  October,  1825, 
and  was  graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  July  I, 
1850.  lie  was  promoted  a  brevet  second  lieutenant  in 
the  artillery,  and  served  in  the  hostilities  against  the 
Seminole  Indians,  in  Florida,  from  1850  to  1853,  in  the 
mean  time  having  been  promoted  to  second  lieutenant, 
First  U.  S.  .Artillery,  February  22,  1 851.  He  served  at 
Forts  Monroe  and  McIIenry  during  the  years  of  1853-55, 
and  was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant  August  21,  1854. 

After  having  served  at  Fort  Monroe,  Key  West,  and 
Barrancas,  he  was  ordered  on  frontier  at  Fort  Leaven- 
worth, Kansas,  from  which  place  he  was  ordered,  at  the 
commencement  of  the  Rebellion,  to  Washington,  'D.  C, 
being  a  first  lieutenant  at  the  time  in  Colonel  Magruder's 
battery  of  light  artillery.  In  less  than  one  year  he  and 
thirteen  either  officers  were  taken  from  that  regiment  for 
the  Staff  Corps,  he  being  appointed  captain  and  com- 
missary of  subsistence  May  10,  1861,  and  performing 
the  duties  of  chief  depot  commissary  of  subsistence  at 
Washington,  D.  C,  to  January  15,  1864,  having  been, 
during  that  time,  promoted  major  September  29,  1861, 
and  colonel  and  additional  aide-de-camp  January  1,  1862, 
holding  the  latter  appointment  until  May  31,  1866. 

Colonel  Beckwith  was  engaged  cm  a  tour  of  inspection 
of  the  commissary  department  in  the  Department  of  Ohio, 
the  Cumberland,  Tennessee,  and  the  Gulf,  from  February 
5  to  April  13,  1864,  and  from  April,  1864,  to  July,  1865, 
he  was  chief  commissary  of  subsistence  of  the  military 
division  of  the  Mississippi,  on  the  staff  of  Major-Gen- 
eral  Sherman,  being  present  with  his  armies  in  their 
battles,  marches,  etc.  His  labors  were  not  confined  to 
his  own  duties,  but  he  often  aided  others, — acting  in  the 
quartermaster's  department  when  requested  or  necessi- 
tated to  do  so. 

He  was  made  brevet  lieutenant-colonel  and  brevet 
colonel  September  I,  1864,  "for  gallant  and  meritorious 
services  in  the  campaign  against  Atlanta,  Georgia ;" 
brevet  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Volunteers,  January  12, 
1865;  brevet  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army,  March  13, 
1865,  "for  gallant  and  meritorious  service  in  the  cam- 
paign terminating  with  the  surrender  of  the  insurgent 
army  under  General  Joseph  E.  Johnston  ;"  brevet  major- 
general  U.  S.  Army,  March  13,  1865,  "for  faithful  and 
meritorious  service  in  the  subsistence  department  during 
the  Rebellion." 


After  the  close  of  field  operations  he  went  to  St.  Louis, 
Missouri,  then  served  as  supervising  commissary  of  sub- 
sistence for  the  Department  of  the  Gulf  States  and  depot 
commissary  of  subsistence,  New  Orleans,  Louisiana ; 
as  chief  commissary  of  subsistence,  Department  of  the 
Gulf,  of  the  Fifth  Military  I  )istrict  (  Louisiana  and  Texas), 
and  in  other  important  capacities  in  the  Southern  and 
Southwestern  States.  During  his  tour  of  duty  in  New 
Orleans,  Louisiana,  he  passed  through  a  disastrous  yel- 
low-fever epidemic  which  nearly  terminated  his  career. 

General  Beckwith  served  as  chief  commissary,  Depart- 
ment of  the  Gulf,  to  March  28,  1874.  Having  been  pro- 
moted lieutenant-colonel  and  assistant  commissary-gen- 
eral of  subsistence  June  23,  1874,  he  was  ordered  to 
Washington,  D.  C,  in  the  office  of  the  commissary-general 
of  subsistence,  and,  after  a  few  months,  took  station  at 
St.  Louis,  Missouri,  as  purchasing  and  depot  commis- 
sary, where  he  remained  from  June  7,  1875,  to  October 
4.  1889. 

On  the  28th  (if  August,  1888,  he  was  promoted  colonel 
and  assistant  commissary-general  of  subsistence,  and  was 
retired  from  active  service,  by  operation  of  law,  October 
4.  1889. 

The  following  is  taken  from  an  editorial  in  the  Army 
and  Navy  Journal  upon  the  retirement  of  General  Beck- 
with : 

"  Although  not  connected  directly  with  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac,  General  McClellan,  in  his  official  report, 
handsomely  refers  to  the  valuable  services  of  this  officer. 
So  highly  was  he  regarded  by  the  late  President  Lincoln, 
who  knew  him  intimately,  that  a  position  in  the  adjutant- 
general's  department,  afterwards  filled  by  General  Drum, 
was  tendered  him,  and  also,  about  the  same  time,  a 
position  in  the  quartermaster's  department.  At  the 
solicitation  of  prominent  officials,  he  was  induced  to 
accept,  in  preference,  a  place  in  the  subsistence  depart- 
ment. Naturally  of  a  meditative  habit  of  mind,  reserved 
and  uncommunicative,  General  Beckwith's  real  ability 
was  not  always  understood  until  necessity  for  action 
gave  opportunity  for  the  manifestation  of  his  energy  and 
persistence  of  purpose.  Then  difficulties  seemed  to  in- 
tensify his  force,  and  no  temporary  defeat  could  turn 
him  from  his  purpose.  Rising  always  to  the  greatness 
of  the  occasion,  he  never  failed  in  the  performance  of 
his  duties,  whatever  their  magnitude.  With  his  retire- 
ment from  active  service,  the  subsistence  department 
loses  one  of  the  ablest  officers  of  the  United  States 
Army,  and  one  whose  devotion  to  the  obligations  of 
duty  and  honor  is  an  example  to  others." 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL   GEORGE   E.   BELKNAP. 

Rear-Admiral  George  E.  Belknap  was  born  in  New 
Hampshire  in  January,  1832,  and  appointed  midshipman 
from  that  State  in  October,  1847.  After  serving  in  the 
African  and  Pacific  Squadrons,  he  went  to  the  Naval 
Academy,  and  became  passed  midshipman  in  1853.  After 
serving  on  the  Coast  Survey,  and  as  acting  master  of 
two  sloops-of-war,  he  was  promoted  master  in  1855,  and 
lieutenant  in  the  same  year.  After  short  shore-service, 
he  went  to  China  in  the  "  Portsmouth  ;"  commanded  a 
howitzer-launch  at  the  capture  of  the  Barrier  Forts,  in 
the  Canton  River,  November,  1856.  The  forts  were  four 
in  number,  and  mounted  one  hundred  and  seventy-six- 
guns  of  all  kinds.  He  assisted  in  undermining  and 
blowing  up  these  works  after  capture.  In  1861  he  com- 
manded the  boats  of  the  "  St.  Louis"  at  both  reinforce- 
ments of  Fort  Pickens.  While  attached  to  the  "  Huron," 
in  1861-62,  he  was  in  the  expedition  against  Fernandina, 
St.  John's,  St.  Mary's,  St.  Augustine,  etc. 

Lieutenant-commander  July,  1862.  Executive-officer 
of  the  "  New  Ironsides"  in  twenty-seven  engagements 
with  Forts  Wagner,  Sumter,  Moultrie,  Batteries  Bee, 
Beauregard,  etc.,  of  the  defences  of  Charleston.  After 
commanding  gunboat  "  Seneca,"  he  commanded  the  iron- 
clad  "  Canonicus"  in  two  actions  with  the  Howlett  Horse- 
Battery  in  December,  1864,  and  at  both  battles  of  Fort 
Fisher,  taking  the  advanced  position.  .After  the  capture 
of  Fort  Fisher  he  proceeded  to  Charleston,  and,  after 
firing  the  last  shot  at  its  defences,  was  present  at  the 
evacuation.  He  then  went  to  Havana,  with  Admiral 
Gordon,  in  quest  of  the  ironclad  "  Stonewall." 


Commanded  "  Shenandoah,"  in  Asiatic  Squadron,  in 
1 866-67. 

Commander  July,  1S66.  Commanded  "Hartford," 
Asiatic  Squadron  flagship,  1867-68.  During  this  time 
commanded  expedition  against  Formosan  natives.  After 
a  tour  of  shore  duty  was  ordered  to  command  of  "  Tus- 
carora,"  and  went  to  the  Pacific.  Co-operated  with  Sel- 
fridge's  party  in  the  Darien  survey.  In  May,  1873,  in 
command  of  "  Tuscarora,"  went  to  make  deep-sea  sound- 
ings between  the  western  coast  of  the  United  States  and 
the  coast  of  Japan,  to  test  the  feasibility  of  a  submarine 
cable.  I  lis  adaptation  of  Sir  William  Thomson's  ma- 
chine, and  his  success  in  obtainim?  soundings  with  wire 
at  great  depths,  are  well  known.  He  ascertained  the 
"  true  continental  outline"  from  Cape  Flattery  to  San 
Diego,  and  ran  a  line  of  soundings  from  San  Diego  to 
Yokohama,  I'l/i  the  Hawaiian  and  Brown  Islands,  and 
from  Yokohama  to  Cape  Flatten",  via  the  Aleutian 
Islands.  Off  the  Japan  coast  he  found  the  most  ex- 
traordinary depths  ever  known, — more  than  five  and 
one-fourth  statute  miles.  He  is  the  inventor  of  several 
cylinders  for  bringing  specimens  from  ocean-bed,  which 
are  in  use  in  the  naval  service  and  the  coast  survey. 

For  these  successes  he  received  the  public  and  em- 
phatic recognition  of  Sir  William  Thomson  and  many 
other  scientific  men. 

Commander  Belknap  was  senior  officer  present  at 
Honolulu  when  serious  political  disturbances  arose,  and 
he  landed  a  force  from  the  "  Tuscarora"  and  the  "  Ports- 
mouth" which  preserved  order  for  several  days.  For 
this  he  had  the  thanks  of  the  king,  the  chambers,  and 
the  consular  corps.  He  then  served  as  hydrographic 
inspector,  and  in  command  of  "  Ohio."  With  impaired 
health  from  exposure  in  deep-sea  work,  he  was  obliged 
to  go  South,  and  was  ordered  as  captain  of  Pensacola 
Navy- Yard.  During  1875  he  was  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Visitors  to  Naval  Academy,  and,  later,  member 
of  the  Board  of  Examiners  of  Midshipmen.  In  187611c 
was  detached  from  duty  at  Pensacola  and  put  on  special 
duty  in  reference  to  deep-sea  soundings.  Afterwards  he 
returned  to  Pensacola  as  commandant,  and  remained 
there  three  years,  lie  then  commanded  the  "  Alaska" 
in  the  Pacific,  and  was  attached  to  the  navy-yard  at  Nor- 
folk. In  1885  he  was  promoted  to  be  commodore,  and 
was  superintendent  of  the  Naval  Observatory  in  1885  ; 
was  commandant  of  the  navy-yard  at  Mare  Island  in 
[886-90.  He  was  promoted  to  be  rear-admiral  in  Feb- 
ruary, [889,  and  commanded  the  Asiatic  Station  until 
1892. 


117/0   SERVED    TN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


33 


COLONEL    AND    BREVET    MAJOR-GENERAL    HENRY 

W  .    BENHAM. 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General  Henry  W. 
Benham  was  born  in  Connecticut.  Graduated  first  in 
his  class  at  the  Military  Academy  July  i,  1 S37  ;  bre- 
vet second  lieutenant  Engineers  July  1,  1837;  assistant 
engineer  on  the  improvement  of  Savannah  River,  Geor- 
gia, 1837-38;  first  lieutenant  July  7,1838;  superintend- 
ing engineer  of  repairs  of  Fort  Marion  and  St.  Augus- 
tine sea-wall,  Florida,  1839-44;  of  repairs  of  defences  of 
Annapolis  Harbor  1844-45;  repairs  of  St.  Augustine 
sea-wall,  Florida,  [845—46;  Forts  Mifflin  and  McHenry 
1 845  ;  repairs  of  Forts  Madison  and  Washington  1  K46-47  ; 
in  war  with  Mexico,  engineer  on  staffs  of  Generals  Taylor 
and  Wool ;  engaged  and  wounded  in  the  battle  of  Buena 
Vista  February,  1847;  brevet  captain  February  25,  1847, 
for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  in  battle  of  Buena 
Vista,  General  Scott  recommending  a  second  brevet  of 
major  for  "his  great  services"  in  that  action;  served  on 
various  engineer  duties  from  1 S47  to  breaking  out  of 
Civil  War,  and  part  of  the  time  was  on  duty  in  Europe. 
In  1855  was  selected  from  the  engineers  for  promotion 
in  the  new  regiments,  but  declined  to  be  major  of  the 
Ninth  Infantry  March.  3,  1855;  served  during  the  rebel- 
lion of  the  seceding  States  1861-66;  as  chief  engineer 
of  General  McClellan,  Department  of  the  Ohio,  May  14 
to  Jul)-  22,  1861,  laying  out  and  building  fortifications  at 
Cairo  and  Bird's  Point ;  was  temporarily  on  the  staff  of 
General  T.  A.  Morris,  in  military  operations  at  Laurel 
Hill,  West  Virginia,  July  6-1 1,  1861  ;  and  in  command  of 
all  the  troops  that  pursued,  routed,  and  killed  General 
Robert  S.  Garnett,  capturing  his  trains  with  artillery,  and 
thus,  as  the  general  commanding  reported,  "  Secession 
was  dead  in  West  Virginia."  Was  brevet  colonel  July 
13,  1 86 1,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle 
of  Carrick's  Ford,  Virginia;  this  commission  (the  first 
battle-brevet  of  the  war)  made  him  the  senior  brevet 
major-general  of  the  Corps  of  Engineers  ;  and  he  was 
recommended  to  be  brevet  brigadier-general  by  the  board 
of  general  officers  for  this  action  ;  major  Corps  of  En- 
gineers August  6,  1 861;  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Volun- 
teers August  13,  1861  ;  in  West  Virginia  campaign  August 
to  November,  1861  ;  in  command  <>f  brigade  at  New 
Creek  August  16,  1861  ;  commanded  the  leading  and  only 
brigade  engaged  at  the  action  and  rout  of  Floyd,  at  Car- 
nifex  Ferry,  September  10,  1861  ;  and  on  November  14 
to  16,  1861,  in  the  skirmishes  and  second  rout  of  Floyd, 
from  Cotton  Hill  to  Raleigh,  West  Virginia,  with  great 
loss  of  baggage  and  trains,  and  his  chief  of  cavalry,  Col- 
onel Croghan,  killed.  Was  present  and  in  command  at  the 
bombardment  and  capture  of  Fort  Pulaski,  Georgia,  April 
10-11,  1S62;  lieutenant-colonel  Corps  of  Engineers 
March   3,    1863;  reorganized  and  commanded  engineer 


brigade  (Army  of  the  Potomac),  being  engaged  in  throw- 
ing pontoon  bridges  across  the  Rappahannock  for  the 
passage  and  retreat  of  the  army  at  Chancellorsville, 
April  29  to  May  5,  1863  ;  his  horse  shot  under  him  at  the 
"crossing"  below  Fredericksburg  April  29,  1863;  laid 
the  pontoon  bridges  at  Franklin's  crossing  in  face  of  the 
enemy  June  5,  1863;  reorganized  the  pontoon  trains  at 
Washington  July,  1863,  to  May,  1864;  and  laid  most  of 
the  pontoon  bridges  for  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  from 
May,  1S64,  to  May,  1865  ;  one  of  them  over  the  James 
River,  at  Fort  Powhatan,  June  1  3,  1 S64,  was  two  thousand 
two  hundred  feet  long,  and  built  in  five  hours  ;  in  the  mean 
time  constructed  and  commanded  the  defences  at  City 
Point,  Virginia,  covering  as  a  reserve  the  main  depots  and 
head-quarters  of  General  Grant ;  and  served  with  his  com- 
mand in  the  lines  in  front  of  Petersburg  ;  brevet  brigadier- 
general  U.  S.  Army  March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  in  the  campaign  terminating  with  the  sur- 
render of  the  insurgent  army  under  General  R.  E.  Lee; 
April  3,  1865,  joined  in  taking  possession  of  Petersburg, 
and  was  placed  in  command  of  that  city,  moving  thence  to 
Burkesville  and  towards  the  Roanoke  River,  to  act  against 
Johnston ;  repairing  bridges  across  Appomattox  and 
Staunton  Rivers  April  3-23,  1865;  and  on  march  to 
Washington,  D.  C,  May  to  June,  1865;  brevet  major- 
general  U.  S.  Vols,  for  faithful  services  during  the  Rebel- 
lion; brevet  major-general  U.  S.  A.  March  13,  1865,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  services  during  the  Rebellion  ; 
mustered  out  of  volunteer  service  Jan.  1  5,  1866,  and  took 
charge  of  the  sea-walls  in  Boston  Harbor;  of  the  defences 
of  Provincetown,  Mass.  ;  colonel  Corps  of  Engineers 
March  7,  1 867,  and  as  member  and  president  of  the  Board 
of  Engineers  June  20,  1865,  to  May  18,  1867;  after  July, 
1877,  in  charge  of  inner  defences  of  N.  Y.  Harbor,  and  of 
the  forts  at  N.  Y.  Narrows,  Sandy  Hook,  N.  J.,  and  Lake 
Champlain  ;  retired  June  30,  1882.  He  died  at  New  York 
City  June  1,  1SS4. 


34 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  ^regular) 


MAJOR   AND   BREVET  COLONEL   FREDERICK   W. 
BENTEEN  (retired). 

Major  and  Brevet  Colonel  Frederick  W.  Benteen 
was  born  in  Petersburg,  Virginia,  August  24,  1834.  Ik- 
entered  the  military  service  at  the  breaking  out  of  the 
war  of  the  Rebellion  as  a  first  lieutenant  in  the  Tenth 
Missouri  Cavalry,  in  which  regiment  he  subsequently 
rose  to  the  rank  oi  lieutenant-colonel,  and  was  appointed 
colonel  of  the  One  Hundred  and  Thirty-eighth  U.  S. 
Colored  Troops  July  15,  1X65. 

Colonel  Benteen's  service  in  the  held  during  the  war 
was  with  the  Western  armies,  participating  in  the  follow- 


ing engagements:  Actions  of  Wet  Glaze,  Springfield,  Sa- 
lem, Second  Springfield,  Cane  Creek,  Sugar  Creek  ;  battle 
of  l'ea  Ridge;  actions  of  Batesville,  Kickapoo,  Cotton 
Plant ;  defence  of  Helena,  Arkansas  ;  actions  of  Milliken's 
Rend,  Bolivar,  and  Greenville;  engaged  at  the  actions  of 
Tuscumbia,  Tupelo  and  Alabama  Valley;  the  battle  of 
Iuka,  Mississippi ;  action  of  Florence  ;  siege  of  Vicksburg  ; 
action  of  Brandon  Station;  capture  of  Jackson  ;  raid  to 
Meridian,  and  action  of  Bolivar;  at  the  actions  of  Big 
Blue  Osage,  Charlotte  Prairie,  Pleasant  Rid^e,  Monte- 
vallo ;  assault  and  capture  of  Selma,  Alabama,  and  Co- 
lumbus, Georgia. 

Colonel  Benteen  commanded  his  regiment  at  the  battle 
of  Iuka  and  action  of  Montevallo,  and  a  brigade  at  the 
action  of  Big  Blue  Osage,  and  at  the  close  of  the  war  was 
mustered  out  January  6,  1 866,  but  subsequently  appointed 
captain  in  the  Seventh  LT.  S.  Cavalry,  to  date  from  July, 
1 866.  He  was  then  ordered  to  the  plains  and  served  at 
man}'  posts  and  on  campaign  duty,  participating  in  the 
engagement  with  hostile  Indians  on  the  Saline  River, 
Kansas,  and  in  the  Big  Horn  and  Yellowstone  expedition 
of  1  cSj6,  his  company  forming  part  of  the  ill-fated  Custer's 
command. 

He  was  made  brevet  major  for  gallant  and  meritorious 
services  at  the  battle  of  the  ( >sage,  Missouri :  brevet  lieu- 
tenant-colonel for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the 
charge  on  Columbus,  Georgia  ;  brevet  colonel  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  conduct  in  the  engagement  with  hostile 
Indians  on  the  Saline  River,  Kansas. 

He  was  promoted  major  of  the  Ninth  U.  S.  Cavalry 
December  17,  [882,  and  retired  for  disability  in  the  line 
of  duty  July  7,  1888. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


35 


MAJOR   EDWIN  BENTLEY. 

Dr.  Edwin  Bentley  was  born  in  New  London  ( !ounty, 

Connecticut  and  in  the  national  contest,  Dr.  Bentley 
became  incited  by  the  fullest  patriotism  and  devotion  for 
the  nation's  cause,  and  he  immediately  took  an  active 
part,  in  season  and  out  of  season, — at  all  times  engaged  in 
caring  for  the  sick  and  wounded,  in  which,  for  continued 
service  and  number  of  operations  made,  he  was  equalled  by 
few  and  excelled  by  none.  For  years  he  had  thousands 
of  wounded  men  under  his  care,  and  at  times  more  than 
a  hundred  medical  officers  under  his  charge.  All  this  he 
conducted — with  the  vast  property  responsibility — with- 
out a  controversy,  or  arrest  of  either  officer  or  soldier 
subject  to  his  orders.  The  following  is  gleaned  from  the 
official  records,  and  is  offered  as  a  brief  exhibit  of  his 
military  service,  which  embraces  an  experience  in  the 
field,  camp,  post,  general  hospital,  and  Libby  prison  at 
Richmond  in  i  S62. 

Statement  of  the  military  service  of  Surgeon  Edwin 
Bentley,  of  the  U.  S.  Arm)-,  compiled  from  the  records 
of  the  War  Department,  Washington  : 

He  was  mustered  into  the  sen-ice  as  assistant  surgeon, 
Fourth  Connecticut  Infantry,  June  6,  1861.  He  was  ap- 
pointed surgeon,  U.  S.  Volunteers,  September  4,  1861, 
and  honorably  mustered  out  January  4,  1S66.  He  re- 
ceived the  brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel  March  13,  [865, 
for  faithful  and  meritorious  service  during  the  war.  He 
served  in  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  in  F.  J.  Porter's 
division,  until  the  autumn  of  1862;  then  in  charge  of 
General  Hospital  at  Alexandria,  Virginia,  and  subse- 
quently as  superintendent  of  hospitals  at  that  place  to 
April,  1866;  was  post-surgeon  at  Russell  Barracks, 
D.  C,  until  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service. 

Was  appointed  assistant  surgeon,  U.S.A.,  February  S, 
1  S(')6,— service  being  continuous  from  the  volunteer  to 
the  regular;  captain  and  assistant  surgeon  July  2^,  1866; 
major  and  surgeon  Jul)-  12,  1879.  He  remained  on  duty 
at  Russell  Barracks,  D.  C,  to  December,  1868;  at  Lin- 
coln Barracks,  D.  C,  to  April,  1869;  at  Camp  Reynolds, 
California,  to  August,  1869;  then  as  post-surgeon  at 
Point  San  Jose,  California,  January,  1871  ;  April  17,  1873, 
with  Batteries  B,  C,  and  G,  Fourth  Artillery,  to  Modoc 
expedition, — in  lava  beds,  at  head-quarters  of  General 
Gillem,  south  side  of  Yula  Lake,  transporting  wounded, 
at  the  conclusion  of  the  war,  from  the  field-hospital,  of 


which  he  was  in  charge,  to  Fort  Klamath,  Oregon.  He 
rejoined  his  proper  station  at  Point  San  Jose,  California, 
where  he  remained  post-surgeon  until  1874.  Also  on 
duty  at  Alcatraz  Island,  at  the  Presidio  of  San  Francisco, 
California;  at  Camp  Bidwell,  California.  February,  1875, 
recorder  of  Medical  Examining  Board  and  attending  sur- 
geon at  San  Francisco,  California.  In  1876  he  was  on 
leave  of  absence,  to  enable  him  to  study  mental  diseases 
and  morbid  anatomy  of  the  nervous  system,  being  super- 
intendent of  the  Napa  Insane  Asylum,  California.  Feb- 
ruary, 1877,  on  duty,  with  the  Sixteenth  Infantry,  at  New 
(  Irleans,  Louisiana,  where,  finding  an  epidemic  of  small- 
pox producing  much  alarm  among  the  troops  of  the 
command,  he  established  a  pest-hospital,  by  order  of  the 
commanding  general,  and  for  his  success  in  its  manage- 
ment and  devotion  to  the  patients  he  received  a  special 
letter  of  commendation  from  the  medical  director  of  the 
department.  In  1887  he  was  on  duty  as  post-surgeon  at 
Little  Rock  Barracks;  on  duty  in  Pennsylvania  during 
the  labor  strikes;  also  medical  director  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Arkansas.  In  1884  he  was  post-surgeon  at 
Fort  Clark,  Texas,  and  post-surgeon  at  Fort  Brown, 
Texas,  in  1886;  was  retired  in  1888;  was  professor  of 
anatomy  in  Pacific  Medical  College,  California,  and  pro- 
fessor of  surgery  in  the  medical  department  of  the 
Industrial  University  of  Arkansas  since  its  organization. 


36 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   ERIC   BF.RGLANO. 

Captain  Eric  Bergland  (Corps  of  Engineers,  U.S.A.) 

enlisted  at  the  age  of  seventeen  in  Company  D,  Fifty- 
seventh  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  September  14,  [861. 
In  December,  1NG1,  was  mustered  into  service  as  second 
lieutenant,  and  in  April,  1862,  he  was  promoted  to  first 
lieutenant,  in  which  capacity  he  served  until  the  regiment 
was  mustered  out  of  service,  the  war  being  ended,  July 
7,  [865.  During  his  connection  with  the  Fifty-seventh 
Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  he  took  part  in  the  capture 
of  Fort  Donelson,  and  the  battles  of  Shiloh,  Corinth, 
and  Resaca.  While  in  the  field  at  Rome,  Georgia,  in 
the  autumn  of  1864,  he  received  an  appointment  as 
cadet  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  at  West  Point. 
On  reporting  to  Superintendent  of  Military  Academy 
November  16,  he  was  informed  that  his  class  was  al- 
ready w'ell  advanced  in  their  studies,  and  that  it  would 
require  considerable  previous  knowledge  of  mathematics 
to  be  able  to  make  up  before  examination  for  the  time 
lost;  as  before  enlisting  in  the  army  he  had  only  en- 


joyed the  advantages  of  a  village  school  and  knew  noth- 
ing of  the  higher  mathematics,  he  thought  it  highly 
improbable  that  he  would  be  able  to  prepare  for  the  first 
examination  after  being  nearly  two  months  behind  his 
classmates.  On  the  advice  of  the  Superintendent,  he 
therefore  applied  to  the  Secretary  of  War  to  have  his 
appointment  extended  to  the  following  June,  when  he 
could  enter  on  equal  terms  with  other  members  of  his 
class.  This  request  was  granted,  and  he  was  in  the 
mean  time  ordered  to  Johnson's  Island,  Ohio,  for  duty  as 
assistant  to  Captain  Tardy,  Corps  of  Engineers,  until 
June  1,  1865. 

Me  graduated  June  15,  1869,  at  the  head  of  his  class, 
and  as  the  staff  corps  had  just  previously  been  closed  by 
Act  of  Congress,  he  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant 
Fifth  Artillery,  and  stationed  at  Fort  Warren,  Massachu- 
setts, and  Fort  Trumbull,  Connecticut,  and  in  the  field 
on  the  Canada  boundary  during  the  Fenian  raid  in  1870. 
June  10,  1872,  he  was  transferred  to  the  Corps  of  Engi- 
neers, and  promoted  to  first  lieutenant ;  promoted  to  cap- 
tain January  10,  [884. 

Since  his  transfer  to  the  Corps  of  Engineers,  he  has 
served  with  the  Engineer  Battalion,  has  been  instructor 
of  military  engineering  and  mathematics,  and  assistant 
professor  of  ethics  and  law  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Acad- 
emy ;  assistant  engineer  on  Western  explorations,  under 
Captain  George  M.  Wheeler,  for  three  years  in  California, 
Arizona,  Nevada,  and  Colorado;  engineer  in  charge  of 
river  and  harbor  improvements  in  Tennessee,  Mississippi, 
Arkansas,  Louisiana,  and  Texas. 

In  command  of  Company  C,  Battalion  of  Engineers, 
and  instructor  of  civil  engineering  U.  S.  Engineer  School, 
located  at  Willett's  Point,  New  York ;  was  ordered  to 
Johnstown,  Pennsylvania,  a  week  after  the  great  flood, 
in  charge  of  a  detachment  and  bridge-train,  and  ordered 
to  replace  by  pontoon-bridges  those  swept  away  by  the 
flood;  since  November  13,  1 891,  stationed  at  Baltimore, 
Maryland,  as  engineer  of  Fifth  and  Sixth  Light-House 
Districts. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


37 


MAJOR  AND  BREVET  COLONEL  REUBEN  F.  BERNARD 
Major  and  Brevet  Colonel  Reuben  F.  Bernard, 
Eighth  Cavalry,  was  a  private,  farrier,  corporal,  sergeant, 
and  first  sergeant  in  the  army  from  February  19,  1855, 
to  January  5,  1862  ;  then  acting  second  lieutenant  of  the 
First  Cavalry  to  July  17,  1862,  when  he  was  appointed  a 
second  lieutenant  of  that  regiment.  He  served  on  the 
Pacific  coast  and  in  New  Mexico  before  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  and  participated  in  the  following  fights  with 
Indians:  On  the  head-waters  of  the  Gila  River,  New 
Mexico,  March  28,  1856;  on  the  Mimbres  River,  New 
Mexico,  April  5,  1856;  in  Pinal  Mountains,  Arizona 
Territory,  December  25,  1858;  on  San  Carlos  River 
December  27,  1858;  on  San  Pedro  River,  Arizona 
Territory,  November  9,  1 S 5 9  ;  near  Fort  Buchanan,  Ari- 
zona Territory,  January  20,  i860;  on  San  Carlos  River, 
Arizona  Territory,  January  21,  1861  ;  skirmish  with 
rebel  Texans  near  Fort  Craig,  New  Mexico,  February 
19,  1862;  battle  of  Valverde,  New  Mexico,  February  21, 
1862  ;  fight  with  Indians  in  the  mountains  near  Socorro, 
New  Mexico,  February  26,  1 862  ;  skirmish  with  rebels 
at  Apache  Canon,  New  Mexico,  March  28,  1862;  battle 
of  Pigeon's  Ranch,  New  Mexico,  March  30,  1862  ; 
skirmish  at  Albuquerque,  New  Mexico,  April  25,  [862; 
skirmish  at  Peralto,  New  Mexico,  April  27,  1862. 

lie  was  promoted  to  be  first  lieutenant  June  2$,  1863, 
and  transferred  to  duty  in  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  and  participated  in  the  following  engagements  : 
Skirmishes  near  Culpeper  Court-House,  Virginia; 
Stevensburgh,  Virginia;  Mine  Run,  Virginia;  Barnet 
Ford,  Virginia  ;  near  Charlottesville,  Virginia  ;  on  Rapi- 
dan  River,  Virginia  ;  battle  of  Todd's  Tavern,  Virginia 
(wounded)  ;  battle  of  Spottsylvania  Court-House,  Vir- 
ginia ;  skirmishes  on  road  to  Beaver  Dam,  Virginia;  at 
Beaver  Dam,  Virginia  ;  on  road  to  Yellow  Tavern,  Vir- 
ginia ;  battle  of  Yellow  Tavern,  Virginia  ;  skirmishes  at 
Meadow  Bridge,  Virginia  ;  after  passing  Meadow  Bridge, 
Virginia;  at  Tunstall's  Station,  Virginia  ;  while  crossing 
Mattapony  River ;  battles  of  Hawes'  Shop,  Virginia ; 
Old  Church,  Virginia;  Cold  Harbor,  Virginia  ;  skirmish 
at  Chickahominy  River,  Virginia  ;  battle  of  Trevilian 
Station,  Virginia  :  skirmishes  at  White  House  Landing, 
Virginia;  at  Chickahominy  River,  Virginia  ;  battles  of 
Deep  Bottom,  Virginia  ;  Darby's  Farm,  Virginia  ;  skir- 
mishes at  Barnesville,  Virginia  ;  Stone  Church,  Virginia  ; 
New  Town,  Virginia;  near  Winchester,  Virginia  ;  near 
Front  Royal,  Virginia;  Shepherdstown,  Virginia;  en- 
gagements at  Smlthfield,  Virginia ;  skirmishes  near  Hall- 
town,  Virginia  ;  Barnesville,  Virginia  ;  Opequan  Creek, 
Virginia  ;  battle  at  Winchester  ;  skirmish  at  Cedarville  ; 
battle  of  Luray  Valley,  Virginia;  skirmishes  near 
Front  Royal,  Virginia;  in  Luray  Valley,  Virginia; 
near  Staunton,  Virginia;  engagement  at  Waynesborough, 
Virginia  ;  skirmishes  at  Rapidan  River,  Virginia  ;    War- 


renton,  Virginia  ;  Snicker's  Gap,  Virginia  ;  Bunker  Hill, 
Virginia;  near  Mount  Jackson,  Virginia  ;  engagement  at 
Waynesborough,  Virginia ;  skirmish  at  South  Anna 
Bridge,  Virginia  ;  engagement  at  White  House  Landing, 
Virginia;  skirmish  on  Chickahominy  River,  Virginia;  en- 
gagement at  Dinwiddie  Court-House,  Virginia  ;  skirmish 
at  White  Oak  Road,  Virginia  ;  engagement  near  Din- 
widdie Court-House,  Virginia ;  battle  of  Five  Forks, 
Virginia;  engagement  at  Scott's  Cross-Roads,  Virginia  ; 
skirmish  at  Drummond's  Mills,  Virginia  ;  battle  of  Sail- 
or's Creek,  Virginia  ;  skirmish  near  Sailor's  Creek,  Vir- 
ginia ;  skirmish  at  night  near  Appomattox  Court-House, 
Virginia;  engagement  of  Appomattox  Court-House. 

Colonel  Bernard  was  brevetted  captain  May  6,  1864, 
for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of 
Todd's  Tavern,  Virginia;  major  August  28,  1864,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  action  at  Smithfield, 
Virginia;  lieutenant-colonel  and  colonel  March  13,  1865, 
for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  during  the  war. 

He  was  promoted  to  the  captaincy  of  Company  G, 
F'irst  U.  S.  Cavalry,  July  28,  1866,  at  which  date  he  was 
serving  with  his  company  on  the  plains  against  the  In- 
dians, participating  in  nineteen  fights,  from  1866  to  1881, 
in  Arizona,  California,  and  Oregon.  ]  le  thus  has  to  his 
credit  one  hundred  and  three  battles  and  skirmishes. 
He  was  recommended  by  General  Orel  for  the  brevet  of 
brigadier-general,  for  gallantry  in  action  with  the  Chiri- 
cahua  Indians,  October  20,  1869.  On  the  7th  of  Feb. 
[886,  marched  Companies  D  and  E,  Sixteenth  Infantry, 
from  Fort  Mcintosh,  Texas,  to  the  city  of  Laredo,  Texas, 
for  the  purpose  of  suppressing  a  local  political  riot  that 
had  been  going  on  for  several  hours  ;  some  twenty  odd 
persons  having  been  killed,  he  took  charge  of  the  city, 
disarmed  both  parties,  kept  charge  of  the  city  for  the 
night,  restoring  order.  He  was  promoted  major  of  the 
Eighth  Cavalry  November  r,  1882. 


3» 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAl'Y  [.regular) 


COLONEL  CLERMONT  L.   BEST  (retired). 

Colonel  Clermont  L.  Best  was  born  in  New  York, 
and  graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  in  the  class  of 
1847.  He  was  appointed  a  brevet  second  lieutenant  of 
the  First  LI.  S.  Artillery,  and  served  in  the  war  with 
Mexico,  during  which  time  he  received  his  appointment 
as  second  lieutenant.  Fourth  Artillery.  <  In  duty  at  Fort 
Monroe,  Baton  Rouge,  Louisiana,  and  Jefferson  Bar- 
racks, Missouri,  in  [848—49,  and  was  then  engaged  in 
Florida,  in  hostilities  against  the  Seminole  Indians, 
during  the  year  1  850. 

He  was  at  this  time  promoted  first  lieutenant  and 
ordered  to  Fort  Hamilton,  and  served  at  that  post  and 
Fort  Mifflin,  Pennsylvania,  from  1X50  to  [853,  when  he 
was  placed  on  frontier  duty  at  Ringgold  Barracks, Texas, 
serving  there  and  at  Fort  Brown  and  Las  Animas.  Texas, 
to  1855.  lie  was  granted  leave  of  absence  at  this  time, 
and  rejoined  his  command  in  [856  in  Florida,  where  he 
was  engaged  in  hostilities  against  the  Seminole  Indians 
to  1857. 

Lieutenant  Best  was  again  ordered  on  frontier  duty, 
and  engaged  in  quelling  Kansas  disturbances  during  the 
years  1857-58.  He  participated  in  the  Utah  expedition 
in  1858,  and  was  on  duty  escorting  recruits  from  New 
York  to  Kansas  in  [859.  He  then  served  at  Fort  Ran- 
dall, Dakota,  to  1, So  1. 


In  April,  [861,  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  he  was  promoted  captain  of  his  regiment,  anil 
ordered  to  the  field  in  command  of  a  battery  in  Major- 
General  Banks's  operations  in  Maryland  and  the  Shenan- 
doah Valley,  Virginia,  to  August,  1862,  then  participated 
in  the  Northern  Virginia  campaign  as  chief  of  artillery 
of  the  Fifth  Army  Corps,  being  engaged  in  the  battle  of 
Cedar  Mountain,  August  9,  1862  ;  in  the  Maryland  cam- 
paign, Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  engaged  in  the  battle 
of  Antietam,  Maryland,  September  17,  1S62. 

He  was  on  the  march  to  Falmouth,  Virginia,  during 
the  fall  of  the  same  year,  and  subsequently  participated 
in  the  Rappahannock  campaign,  being  engaged  in  the 
battle  of  Chancellorsville,  Virginia,  May  2,  3,  1X63,  for 
which  he  was  brevetted  a  major  for  gallant  and  merito- 
rious services  in  said  battle. 

Captain  Best  was  detailed  as  assistant  inspector-general, 
Twelfth  Army  Corps,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  May  16, 
1  86  ;,  which  position  he  held  to  April  4,  1  S64,  and  during 
that  time  was  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Gettysburg,  July 
1-3,  1 863,  for  which  he  received  the  brevet  of  lieutenant- 
colonel  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services.  He  was 
then  placed  in  command  of  the  First  Division  of  Artil- 
lery Reserve,  Department  of  the  Cumberland,  from  April 
to  October,  1864,  when  he  was  detailed  as  instructor  of 
artillery  at  Camp  Barry,  Washington,  D.  C,  to  February, 
1S65. 

At  the  close  of  the  war,  Captain  Best  was  brevetted  a 
colonel  for  good  conduct  and  gallant  services  during  the 
Rebellion.  He  was  placed  on  recruiting  service  at  Phil- 
adelphia in  February,  [865,  where  he  remained  to  Sep- 
tember, [866,  when  he  was  ordered  to  garrison  duty  in 
the  defences  of  Washington,  remaining  there  to  March, 
1867. 

Colonel  Best  was  promoted  major  of  the  First  Artil- 
lery February  5,  1867;  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  same 
regiment  March  15,  [881,  but  subsequently  transferred 
to  the  Fourth  Artillery  (October  2~ ,  1 88 1 ) ;  and  colonel 
of  the  Fourth  Artillery  October  2,  [883,  from  which  he- 
was  retired  from  active  service,  by  operation  of  law, 
April  25,  iSSS. 

During  the  time  that  Colonel  Best  was  a  field-officer, 
he  served  at  many  of  the  artillery  posts  in  different  parts 
of  the  country,  being  commanding  officer  of  most  of 
them. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR 


39 


COLONEL   AND   BREVET   BRIGADIER-GENERAL 
JUDSON    D.  BINGHAM. 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Brigadiek-Gexekal  Judson  D. 
Bingham  (Quartermaster's  Department)  was  born  in 
New  York  May  16,  i  S 3 1 ,  and  graduated  from  the  Mili- 
tary Academy  Jul}-  1,  1854.  He  was  promoted  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Second  Artillery  same  day,  and  served 
as  assistant  instructor  of  artillery  tactics  at  the  Military 
Academy  from  that  time  until  the  following  August,  and 
was  then  stationed  at  Fort  Wood,  New  York  harbor,  and 
Barrancas,  Florida,  until  March,  185(1,  when  he  was  pro- 
moted first  lieutenant  and  was  placed  on  U.  S.  Coast  Sur- 
vey service  to  June,  1857.  1  le  was  at  the  Artillery  School 
of  Practice  at  Fort  Monroe  from  that  time  to  i860,  in 
the  mean  time  participating  in  an  expedition  to  Harper's 
Ferry,  Virginia,  to  suppress  the  John  Brown  raid  of 
1859. 

Lieutenant  Bingham  was  also  engaged  in  an  expedi- 
tion from  Fort  Ridgely,  Minnesota,  to  the  Yellow  Medi- 
cine, Minnesota,  in  the  summer  of  i860,  and  remained 
at  that  station  until  the  opening  of  the  Civil  War  in 
April,  iS6i,when  he  was  transferred  to  Fort  McHenry, 
Maryland.  He  was  appointed  a  captain  in  the  Quarter- 
master's Department  May  13,  1861,  and  served  in  Gen- 
eral Banks's  command,  in  charge  ol  trains  and  supplies, 
in  the  field  in  Maryland  until  February,  1862,  when  he 
was  placed  in  charge  of  the  quartermaster's  depot  at 
Nashville,  Tennessee,  and  while  there  was  appointed 
lieutenant-colonel  of  volunteers  January  1,  1863. 

He  served  as  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Seventeenth 
Army  Corps  (lieutenant-colonel  ex  officio)  to  April  23, 
1863,  when  General  Grant  appointed  him  chief  quarter- 
master of  the  Department  and  Army  of  the  Tennessee. 
He  continued  on  duty,  in  the  field,  as  chief  quartermaster 
of  that  army  up  to  the  end  of  the  siege  of  Atlanta,  Geor- 
gia, August  25,  1864;  was  present  as  chief  quartermaster 
of  the  Seventeenth  Army  Corps  at  Lake  Providence  and 
Milliken's  Bend,  Louisiana,  at  the  siege  of  Vicksburg, 
Mississippi,  at  the  surrender  of  the  city,  and  during  its 
occupation,  to  October,  1863;  at  Memphis,  Tennessee, 
and  at  Bridgeport  and  Scottsborough,  Alabama,  until  last 
of  December,  1863  ;  he  joined  General  Sherman  at  Cairo, 
Illinois,  January  I,  1864,  and  under  his  direction  arranged 
for  transporting  troops  from  Memphis  to  Vicksburg  for 
the  expedition  to  Meridian,  Mississippi;  then  as  chief 
quartermaster  of  the  Army  of  the  Tennessee  accompanied 
General  Sherman  on  the  march  with  the  Sixteenth  and 
Seventeenth  Army  Corps  from  Vicksburg  to  Meridian 
and  return,  February  and  March,  1864;  was  present  as 
chief  quartermaster  at  head-quarters,  Army  of  the  Ten- 
nessee, Huntsville,  Alabama,  and  in  the  invasion  of  Geor- 
gia, including  siege  of  Atlanta,  1864. 

Colonel  Bingham  was  appointed  colonel  of  volunteers 


August  2,  1864,  and  was  appointed  inspector  of  the  Quar- 
termaster's 1  )epartment  (colonel  ex  officio),  serving  as  such 
to  December  31,  18S6,  being  on  duty  in  the  quartermas- 
ter-general's office,  Washington,  D.  C,  at  various  times 
from  September,  1864,  to  December,  1865  ;  on  duty  with 
General  Sherman  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  as  inspector  of 
the  Quartermaster's  Department,  to  January,  1867;  chief 
quartermaster,  Department  of  the  Lakes,  at  Detroit, 
Michigan,  to  March  31,  1870;  in  the  spring  of  1869  he- 
made  inspections  at  Forts  Richardson,  Griffin,  Concho, 
Stockton,  Davis,  McKavett,  and  San  Antonio,  Texas. 

He  was  promoted  major  in  the  Quartermaster's  De- 
partment, LI.  S.  Army,  July  29,  1866,  and  lieutenant- 
colonel  and  deputy  quartermaster-general  March  3,  1875, 
serving  as  assistant  in  the  office  of  the  quartermaster- 
general  at  Washington,  D.  C,  from  April  4,  1870,  to 
October,  1879,  and  in  charge  of  the  Bureau  from  October 
25,  1873,  to  January  19,  1874,  and  from  January  28  to 
February  20,  1875  ;  he  served  as  commissioner  to  audit 
Kansas  war  accounts,  under  act  of  Congress,  from  March 
8  to  April  5,  1871  ;  as  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Missouri,  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  from 
October,  1879,  to  November,  1883;  as  chief  quartermas- 
ter, Division  of  the  Pacific  and  Department  of  California, 
from  November,  1883,  to  about  May  30,  1886;  as  chief 
quartermaster,  Division  of  the  Missouri,  Chicago,  Illinois, 
from  June  4,  1886,  to  present  time,  having  been,  on  the 
2d  of  July,  1883,  promoted  colonel  and  assistant  quarter- 
master-general. 

When  the  war  terminated,  Colonel  Bingham  had  the 
following  brevets  conferred  upon  him  :  major,  lieutenant- 
colonel,  and  colonel  March  13,  1865,  "for  faithful  and 
meritorious  services  during  the  war ;"  brigadier-general 
April  9,  1865,  "for  faithful  and  meritorious  services  in 
the  field  during  the  war." 


4o 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


COMMANDHR  JOSHUA   BISHOP,    U.S.N. 

Commander  Joshua  Bishop  was  horn  in  Missouri  in 
1839,  and  appointed  acting  midshipman  from  that  State 
1  Ie  graduated  at  the  Naval  Academy  in  1858,  and  after  the 
usual  sea-service — in  the  "Saratoga,"  "Wabash,"  "Pow- 
hatan," and  "Pawnee" — was  made  lieutenant  in  1861. 

The  troublous  time  at  the  inception  of  the  Civil  War 
found  him  at  his  home  in  Missouri.  He  used  all  his 
influence  to  prevent  an  appeal  to  arms,  and  declared 
himseli  for  the  Union  without  hesitation.  Being  sum- 
moned to  duty  at  Philadelphia,  he  had  great  difficulty  in 
leaving  the  State,  from  the  determined  opposition  shown 
by  his  rebel  neighbors,  who  had  stopped  the  running  of 
the  trains,  and  who  pursued  the  stage  in  which  he  trav- 
elled. When  he  reached  Philadelphia  he  was  at  fust 
under  Du  Pont,  but  was  soon  sent  West  again,  under 
Commander  John  Rodgers,  to  assist  in  fitting  out  gun- 
boats. He  reported  to  General  McClellan  at  Cincinnati, 
and  was  thenceforth  employed  in  various  ways — fitting 
gunboats,  commanding  the  receiving-vessel,  and  purchas- 
ing supplies — until   August,  1861,  when   he  went  to   St. 


Louis,  recruited  a  number  of  men,  and  in  September  took 
them  to  Cairo,  Illinois,  tor  the  gunboats.  Naval  officers 
reported  to  general  officers,  and  until  Jul}',  1  862,  were  part 
of  army.  Colonel  Grant  went  down  with  him,  in  the  same 
boat,  to  take  command  at  Cairo.  After  that  time  events 
of  importance  occurred  in  rapid  succession.  Lieutenant 
Bishop  became  executive  officer  under  Walke,  in  Foote's 
squadron,  in  which  capacity  he  was  present  at  several  gun- 
boat engagements,  and  at  the  battle  of  Belmont,  which 
was  Grant's  first  battle  of  the  Civil  War.  His  next  duty 
was  as  aid  to  Foote  at  St.  Louis.  Then  he  was  sent  with 
Fads,  the  engineer  and  contractor  for  the  "Benton," 
to  get  her  down  to  Cairo  at  a  very  low  stage  of  water. 
In  the  "  Benton,"  Lieutenant  Bishop  was  in  the  actions 
at  Columbus,  Island  No.  10,  Fort  Pillow,  and  Memphis. 
On  the  way  down  he  captured  a  rebel  steamer  in  sight 
of  the  retreating  fleet  and  out  of  sight  of  the  Union  fleet. 

At  Memphis  he  boarded  the  "  General  Bragg,"  saved 
her  from  being  blown  up  by  a  train  which  had  been  laid 
to  her  magazine,  and  caulked  the  shot-holes  in  her,  so 
that  she  was  preserved  as  a  prize.  As  a  reward  for  his 
gallantry  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  the  vessel. 
He  commanded  the  "  General  Bragg"  when  the  rebel 
ram  "  Arkansas"  ran  down  through  the  fleet,  and  in  the 
subsequent  operations  until  the  fall  of  Vicksburg.  His 
health  having  become  bad,  he  then  applied  for  relief.  The 
thanks  of  Congress  were  given  to  the  officers  and  men  of 
the  squadrons  of  Rear-Admirals  Foote  and  Davis  f<  »r  their 
long  series  of  actions,  beginning  with  Forts  Henry  and 
Donelson,  in  almost  all  of  which  Commander  Bishop 
took  part. 

Commander  Bishop  was  upon  the  blockade  for  a  short 
time,  and  was  also  stationed  at  the  Naval  Academy. 
He  has  made  extensive  cruises  in  foreign  waters,  serving 
in  the  "  Wyoming,"  "  Saranac,"  "  Pensacola,"  "  Benicia," 
"Plymouth,"  and  "Galena."  Lis  last  cruise  was  in 
command  of  the  "  Iroquois"  among  the  South-Sea 
Islands. 

He  is  at  present  assistant  to  the  Superintendent  of  the 
U.  S.  Naval  Observatory. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


4« 


COLONEL  Z.  R.  BLISS. 

Colonel  Z.  R.  Bliss  was  appointed  a  cadet  at  West 
Point  in  1850.  Graduated  in  1854.  Was  appointed 
brevet  second  lieutenant  Sixteenth  Infantry,  and  ordered 
to  Fort  Duncan,  Texas.  Served  at  various  forts  in  Texas 
until  1 86 1,  part  of  the  time  in  command  of  a  company. 
On  April  5,  1 86 1,  he  left  Fort  Quitman  with  his  com- 
pany and  joined  the  command  of  Colonel  Reeve,  and 
marched  with  that  command  six  hundred  and  fifty  miles 
to  San  Antonio,  Texas.  On  May  9,  1861,  when  they 
were  about  fifteen  miles  from  San  Antonio,  they  were 
met  by  a  large  force  of  over  two  thousand  men,  under 
rebel  General  Earl  Van  Dorn,  consisting  of  a  regiment 
of  infantry,  one  of  cavalry,  a  battery  of  six  pieces  of 
artillery,  and  an  independent  company  of  about  one  hun- 
dred men.  When  met  by  the  rebels,  Colonel  Reeve's 
command  had  only  about  a  dozen  rounds  of  ammunition 
per  man  and  one  day's  rations;  an  unconditional  surren- 
der was  demanded,  and,  after  some  parley,  Colonel  Reeve 
surrendered  his  command ;  but  as  Lieutenant  Bliss  was 
only  a  junior  first  lieutenant,  and  was  not  consulted  in 
the  matter,  he  was  not  responsible  for  the  surrender. 
1  le  remained  a  prisoner  of  war  for  nearly  a  year,  most 
of  the  time  confined  in  the  negro  jail  at  Richmond.  In 
May,  1862,  he  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Tenth  Rhode 
Island  Volunteers  and  served  with  it  till  August,  when 
he  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Seventh  Rhode  Island 
Volunteers,  and  remained  with  it  until  honorably  mus- 
tered out  after  the  close  of  the  war.  Commanded  the 
regiment  during  the  Fredericksburg  campaign,  and  after 
the  first  battle  of  Fredericksburg  was  recommended  for 
promotion  to  rank  of  brigadier-general,  but,  in  conse- 
quence of  his  having  been  present  at  the  surrender  in 
Texas,  this  recommendation  was  not  carried  out.  In 
fact,  no  officer  who  was  present  with  Colonel  Reeve  at 
the  surrender  was  promoted  during  the  war,  although 
several  of  them  were  strongly  recommended  for  advance- 
ment. In  1863  Colonel  Bliss  was  transferred  with  his 
regiment  to  Kentucky,  and  thence  to  Vicksburg  and 
Jackson  in  the  campaign  after  Johnson,  and  at  the  con- 
clusion was  recommended,  this  time  by  General  Grant, 
for  promotion.  Commanded  the  District  of  Middle  Ten- 
nessee during  the  winter  of  1863-64.  It  was  an  impor- 
tant command,  including  a  large  fort  and  several  regi- 
ments, and  protecting  about  two  million  rations  for 
Sherman's  army.  In  1864  Colonel  Bliss  was  again 
recommended  for  promotion  to  rank  of  brigadier-general. 
Colonel  Bliss  remained  in  command  of  District  of  Mid- 
dle Tennessee  until  the  regiment  he  commanded  was 
transferred  to  the  East,  and  he  was  assigned  to  the  com- 
mand of  First  Brigade,  Second  Division,  Ninth  Army 
Corps,  and  commanded  it  in  the  Wilderness,  where  he 
6 


was  brevetted  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services.  He 
was  in  command  of  the  brigade  to  Spottsylvania,  where 
he  was  injured  by  his  horse  jumping  on  him  in  crossing 
a  stream  at  night.  He  commanded  the  brigade  in  the 
mine  which  was  constructed  by  a  regiment  of  his  brigade, 
and  at  the  explosion  of  the  mine  and  ensuing  battle,  and 
received  a  very  complimentary  letter  from  his  division 
commander,  General  R.  B.  Potter.  He  remained  in 
command  of  the  brigade  until  the  early  fall,  when  he  was 
obliged  to  take  a  sick-leave.  After  being  absent  some 
weeks  he  was  placed  on  light  duty  on  a  board  of  officers,  as 
president,  and  remained  on  that  duty  till  the  close  of  the 
war  in  the  following  spring,  when  he  was  mustered  out 
of  the  volunteer  service.  Transferred  with  his  company 
to  South  Carolina  in  1866,  and  given  command  of  the 
district  of  Chester.  He  was  acting  assistant  commis- 
sioner of  the  Bureau  of  Freedmen,  and  had  charge  of 
all  the  civil  and  military  business  of  that  district.  In 
August  was  ordered  on  recruiting  service,  receiving  the 
detail  for  having  served  longer  in  the  field  during  the 
rebellion  than  any  other  officer  in  the  regiment.  In 
August,  1867,  promoted  major  of  Thirty-ninth  Infantry. 
Commanded  part  of  Jackson  Barracks,  Forts  Jackson 
and  St.  Philip,  till  1870,  when  he  was  transferred  with  his 
regiment  to  Texas,  commanding  various  forts  there,  and 
for  more  than  a  year  the  regiment.  In  187S  he  was  or- 
dered to  command  the  principal  depot  for  general  recruit- 
ing service.  In  1880  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel 
of  Nineteenth  Infantry.  In  1S86  was  made  colonel  of 
Twenty-fourth  Infantry,  of  which  he  still  remains  in  com- 
mand. This  officer  has  served  longer  on  the  South- 
western frontier  than  any  other  officer  ever  in  the  ser- 
vice. 


4-1 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD  XAVY  {regular* 


MEDICAL    DIRECTOR   DEL  A  VAN    BLOODGOOD, 

U.S.N. 

Medical    Director    Delavan    Blood d,    U.S.N., 

was  born  in  Erie  County,  New  York,  in  1831.  Commis- 
sioned as  assistant  surgeon  March,  1857.  Passed  assist- 
ant surgeon  December,  1861.  Surgeon  January  24, 
1S62.  Medical  inspector  February  3,  1875.  Medical 
director  August,  1884. 

llis  first  service  was  on  board  the  "Merrimac,"  on  the 
Pacific  station,  from  1857  to  i860.  Then  attached  to  the 
"  Mohawk',"  on  special  service  in  the  West  Indies,  to  inter- 
cept slaving  vessels.  The  "  Mohawk"  made  several  cap- 
tures, and  then  (without  the  sanctii  in  of  the  administration) 
aided  in  preserving  the  forts  at  Key  West  and  Tortugas 
when  the  stormy  days  of  the  inception  of  the  great  rebel- 
lion were  at  hand.  When  the  first  secessions  occurred, 
the  "  Mohawk"  convoyed  from  Texas  the  troops  involved 
in  the  Twiggs  surrender,  and  then  went  upon  the  first 
blockade  established  during  the  war,  off  Pensacola.  In 
November,  1S61,  Dr.  Bloodgood  was  detached  from  the 
"  Mohawk,"  and,  on  the  way  north,  by  transport  steamer, 
arrived  off  Port  Royal  at  the  time  of  the  battle  there, 
and  was  ordered  to  the  transport  "  Atlantic,"  in  charge  of 
a  detachment  of  the  sick  and  wounded  for  conveyance 
to  the  hospital  at  New  York.  He  was  next  assigned  for 
duty  on  board  the  steam-sloop  "Dakota,"  and  served 
on  board  that  vessel  till  near  the  close  of  the  war.     In 


her  he  participated  in  the  various  operations  about 
Hampton  Roads,  from  the  first  appearance  of  the  rebel 
ram  "  Merrimac"  until  her  destruction,  and  then  co-op- 
erated with  the  army  during  the  first  Peninsula  cam- 
paign. For  a  short  time  the  ship  was  in  the  Gulf  of 
Mexico  and  the  Mississippi,  under  Farragut,  and  next 
cruised  through  the  West  Indies  and  off  the  coast  of  Nova 
Scotia,  in  search  of  privateers  ;  but  she  was  mostly  in 
service  on  the  blockade  off  the  Carolinas,  and  in  nu- 
merous engagements  with  coast  batteries.  During  this 
service,  of  nearly  three  years,  there  occurred  on  board 
an  epidemic  of  yellow  fever,  and  another  of  small-pox, 
each  of  which  necessitated  a  visit  to  a  Northern  port,  and 
the  disinfection  of  the  ship.  In  returning  from  service  in 
this  vessel,  in  1864,  Dr.  Bloodgood  happened  to  be  one 
of  those  captured  and  plundered  by  rebel  raiders  in  the 
railroad  train  taken  near  Gunpowder  River.  After  ser- 
vice on  board  the  "  .Michigan,"  and  the  receiving-ship 
"Vermont,"  he  joined  the  sloop-of-war  "Jamestown,"  in 
February,  1867,  at  Panama,  when  an  extremely  virulent 
type  of  yellow  fever  was  raging  on  board.  In  conse- 
quence, the  ship  was  sent  to  Sitka  for  disinfection,  and 
remained  there  until  the  following  spring,  when  she  was 
put  out  of  commission  at  the  Mare  Island  Yard.  He 
then  joined  the  "  Lackawanna,"  on  the  Mexican  coast, 
and  after  that  cruise  had  shore  duty  at  New  York. 
In  May,  1872,  was  ordered  to  the  "Plymouth,"  of  the 
European  Squadron,  and  thence,  via  India,  to  the  China 
station,  where  he  served  on  board  the  flag-ships  "  Colo- 
rado," "Lackawanna,"  and  "  Hartford,"  as  fleet-surgeon 
for  two  years.  Then  he  was  transferred  to  Pacific  station 
as  fleet-surgeon,  but  soon  detached  and  ordered  home  to 
duty  at  New  York.  Was  fleet- surgeon  of  the  European 
station,  in  flag-ship  "Trenton,"  1877-79.  On  ms  return 
was  in  charge  of  the  Naval  Hospital  at  New  York,  and 
then  of  the  Naval  Laboratory,  and  next  had  charge  of 
the  Naval  Hospital  at  Norfolk,  Virginia.  In  18S7  he 
was  ordered  to  the  Naval  Laboratory  at  New  York',  in 
which  position  he  still  continues.  Dr.  Bloodgood  is  an 
alumnus  of  Madison  University,  Hamilton,  New  York, 
and  of  Jefferson  Medical  College,  at  Philadelphia;  mem- 
ber of  the  Phi  Beta  Kappa;  the  Military  Order  of  the 
Loyal  Legion  of  the  United  States  ;  the  Holland  Society  ; 
the  St.  Nicholas  Society,  of  Nassau  Island;  the  Univer- 
sity Club,  of  New  York  ;  the  St.  Nicholas  Club,  of  New 
York,  and  Hamilton  Club,  of  Brooklyn. 


117/0   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


43 


REAR-ADMIRAL  CHARLES  S.   BOGGS. 

Rear-Admiral  Charles  S.  Bonus  was  born  in  New 
Jersey  January  28,  181 1  ;  appointed  midshipman  from  the 
same  State  November  1,  1826;  attached  to  sloop-of-war 
" Warren,"  Mediterranean  Squadron,  1829-32.  Pro- 
moted to  passed  midshipman  April  28,  1832;  receiving- 
ship  at  New  York,  1832-35  ;  rendezvous,  New  York,  1836. 
Commissioned  as  lieutenant  September  6,  1837;  sloop 
"  Saratoga,"  coast  of  Africa,  1840-43.  Was  an  active  par- 
ticipant in  the  burning  of  five  villages  on  the  coast ;  Home 
Squadron,  1846-47;  present  at  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz; 
commanded  the  boat  expedition  from  the  "  Princeton"  that 
destroyed  the  LT.  S.  brig  "  Truxton,"  after  her  surrender  to 
the  Mexicans;  receiving-ship  at  New  York,  1848-51 ;  navy- 
yard, New  York,  1852-54;  inspector,  etc.,  New  York,  1855. 
Commissioned  as  commander  September  14,  1855  ;  com- 
manding mail-steamer  "Illinois,"  1856-58;  light-house 
inspector,  1860-61  ;  commanded  sloop-of-war  "  Varuna," 
at  the  passage  of  Forts  Jackson  and  St.  Philip,  April  24, 
1862.  The  "  Varuna"  was  the  only  one  of  Farragut's 
squadron  lost  at  the  battle  of  New  Orleans.  She  was 
attacked  by  two  of  the  rebel  rams  and  badly  damaged, 
and  her  commander,  finding  his  vessel  sinking,  ran  her 
into  the  bank  and  made  fast  to  the  trees.  Captain  Boggs 
fought  his  vessel  gallantly  to  the  last.  Commissioned  as 
captain  Jul\-  16,  1S62;  commanding  steam-sloop  "  Juni- 
ata," 1863  ;  special  duty,  New  York,  1864-66.  Commis- 
sioned as  commodore  July  25,  1866;  commanding  steamer 
"  De  Soto,"  North  Atlantic  Squadron,  1867-68;  special 
duty,  1869-72.  Promoted  to  rear-admiral  July,  1870. 
He  died  in  1877. 

Always  an  excellent  and  most  reliable  officer,  his 
conduct  in  command  of  the  "  Varuna"  elicited  the  praise 
even  of  his  adversaries.  Being  in  the  First  Division  at 
the  passage  of  the  Mississippi  forts,  and  having  a  fast 
ship,  he  outstripped  his  consorts,  and  chased  the  enemy 
alone  until  he  was  surrounded  by  them.  At  first,  in  the 
darkness,  the  Confederates  did  not  attack  him,  thinking 
him  one  of  their  own  squadron.  But  Boggs  soon  ap- 
prised them  of  his  identity  by  a  rapid  fire  from  both  sides. 


Three  of  the  enemy  were  driven  ashore  in  flames,  and 
one  large  steamer,  with  troops  on  board,  drifted  ashore 
with  an  exploded  boiler,  the  result  of  this  encounter.  At 
daylight  the  "  Varuna"  was  attacked  by  two  vessels  at 
the  same  time,  the  "  Governor  Moore"  and  the  "  Stone- 
wall Jackson."  The  "  Moore"  was  a  ram,  commanded 
by  an  ex-ofheer  of  the  navy,  and  they  treated  the  "  Va- 
runa" very  badly,  penetrating  her  below  water,  and  killing 
and  wounding  a  number  of  her  crew.  But  the  "  Varuna's" 
people  stuck  to  their  guns,  and  finally  drove  off  the  two, 
completely  disabled  for  further  conflict,  besides  being  on 
fire.  The  details  of  this  encounter  (most  exciting)  can- 
not be  given.  Admiral  Porter  says,  in  his  account  of  the 
fight,  "  This  ended  the  irregular  fighting  with  the  Con- 
federate vessels  ;  ten  of  them  had  been  sunk  or  destroyed, 
while  the  '  Varuna,'  with  her  two  adversaries,  lay  at  the 
bottom  of  the  river,  near  the  bank,  evidence  of  the 
gallantry  of  Boggs." 

Admiral  Boggs  had  the  respect  of  all  who  knew  him, 
whether  in  the  service  or  out  of  it.  He  was  perfectly 
modest  and  unostentatious  in  deportment,  while  dignified 
and  officer-like  at  all  times. 


44 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  {regular) 


CAPTAIN   EDWARD   C.    BOWERS,    U.S.N. 

Captain  Edward  C.  Bowers  was  born  in  Connec- 
ticut. Before  entering  the  navy  he  served  in  the  mer- 
chant service  and  in  the  Permian  and  Greek  navies. 
The  nautical  experience  thus  gained  proved  of  great 
value  to  him  in  his  subsequent  career  as  an  officer  of 
the  U.  S.  Navy.  Appointed  from  Connecticut  to  the 
grade  of  midshipman  February  2,  1829  His  first  cruise 
was  on  the  sloop-of-war  "  St.  Louis,"  attached  to  the  Pa- 
cific Squadron,  1829-31  ;  served  on  schooner  "  Dolphin." 
Pacific  Squadron,  as  acting  lieutenant,  1832.  He  was 
then  ordered  to  Navy- Yard,  Boston,  where  he  served 
during  the  years    1833-34.      Promoted  to  passed  mid- 


shipman July  3,  1835  ;  was  attached  to  frigate  "  Constel- 
lation," West  Indies  Squadron,  1836-38.  His  next  cruise 
was  on  the  flag-ship  "  Ohio,"  Mediterranean  Squad- 
ron, in  1839;  attached  to  receiving-ship  "  Boston,"  1840. 
Commissioned  as  lieutenant  April  26,  1S41  ;  receiving- 
ship,  Boston,  1842-45.  He  was  then  ordered  to  the 
steamer  "  Princeton,"  and  cruised  on  her  in  the  Gulf  of 
Mexico,  1846;  transferred  to  ordnance  transport  "  Elec- 
tra,"  1847;  and  from  her  again  transferred,  this  time  to 
sloop-of  war  "  Decatur,"  on  which  vessel  he  made  a  full 
cruise  on  the  coast  of  Africa  during  the  years  1847-50; 
at  the  expiration  of  his  cruise  on  the  "  Decatur,"  he  was 
at  once  ordered  to  the  sloop  "  Plymouth,"  and  went  in 
her  to  the  East  Indies,  where  he  served  during  the  years 
[851-52;  receiving-ship,  New  York,  1852-54;  retired, 
[855.  It  will  be  seen  from  the  foregoing  statement  of 
services  that  Captain  Bowers,  from  the  date  of  his  origi- 
nal entry  into  the  service,  February  2,  1829,  up  to  the 
time  of  his  retirement  in  1 85 5,  was  almost  constantly 
employed  at  sea,  and  in  fact  few  officers  of  his  date  had 
so  good  a  record  of  active  and  continuous  service  afloat. 
Rendezvous,  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  1861-63. 
Commissioned  as  commander  July  21,  1861  ;  command- 
ing receiving-ship  "  Vandalia,"  Portsmouth,  New  Hamp- 
shire, 1864-65.     Commissioned  as  captain  1867. 

Captain  Bovvers  was  retired  (in  conformity  with  the 
Act  of  February  28,  1S55,  and  its  amendments,  January 
16,  1857,  March  10,  1858,  and  May  II,  1858)  on  the 
13th  September,  1855,  as  stated  above,  but  was  on  duty 
at  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  during  the  Civil  War. 

Captain  Bowers  served  in  the  Mexican  and  Seminole 
wars,  ami  also  under  Commodores  Hull,  Bainbridge, 
Stewart,  Perry,  and  Chauncey. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


45 


COLONEL  ALBERT  GALLATIN  BRACKETT  (retired). 

Colonel  Albert  Gallatin  Brackett  was  born  in 
Otsego  Count)-,  New  York,  on  the  14th  day  of  February, 
1829.  In  1846  he  removed  to  Indiana,  and  in  June, 
1 847,  became  second  lieutenant  in  the  Fourth  Indiana 
Volunteers  in  the  Mexican  War,  and  was  promoted  first 
lieutenant  during  the  same  month.  His  regiment  was 
attached  to  General  Joseph  Lane's  brigade,  and  partici- 
pated in  the  skirmishes  at  Paso  de  Ovejas  and  La  Hoya, 
the  battle  of  Huamantla,  the  siege  of  Puebla,  and  the 
bombardment  of  Atlixco  in  September  and  October, 
1847.  He  served  until  the  close  of  the  war  and  was  hon- 
orably discharged  on  the  16th  of  July,  1848. 

On  the  3d  of  March,  1855,  he  was  appointed  captain 
from  Indiana,  in  the  Second  Regiment  of  Cavalry,  and 
after  raising  a  company  in  Indiana  and  Illinois,  was  sent 
to  Texas  to  fight  the  Indians,  who  were  then  very  trou- 
blesome. He  met  and  defeated  the  Lipans  on  Guada- 
lupe River  in  March,  1856,  recapturing  much  valuable 
property ;  the  Comanches  at  Arroyo  de  las  Encinas 
February  1,  1857,  and  near  Presidio  de  San  Vincente, 
Chihuahua,  May  2,  1 859,  for  which  he  received  the  thanks 
of  General  Scott,  commanding  the  army.  He  was  en- 
gaged in  suppressing  the  Cortinas  troubles  near  Browns- 
ville, and  along  the  Rio  Grande  frontier  in  i860. 

When  the  Civil  War  broke  out  he  went  with  his  com- 
pany to  Key  West,  Florida,  and  thence  to  Havana,  Cuba, 
and  from  there  to  New  York  and  Carlisle  Barracks, 
where  lie  refitted  and  was  sent  to  Washington,  taking 
part  in  the  battles  of  Blackburn's  Ford  and  Bull  Run  in 
July,  1861.  He  became  colonel  of  the  Ninth  Regiment 
of  Illinois  Cavalry  in  October,  1861,  and  participated  in 
the  actions  at  the  Waddell  Farm,  Stewart's  Plantation, 
and  Cache  Bayou,  Arkansas,  in  June,  1862,  being  severely 
wounded  at  Stewart's  Plantation,  where  he  saved  a  valu- 
able train  from  falling  into  the  hands  of  the  Confederates. 
He  was  promoted  major  in  the  First  Cavalry  on  the  17th 
of  July,  1862,  and  served  as  chief  of  cavalry,  Department 
of  Missouri,  in  1862-63. 

He  was  placed  in  command  of  the  Second  Brigade  of 
the  Cavalry  Division,  Sixteenth  Army  Corps  (Army  of  the 
Tennessee),  in  West  Tennessee  in  January  and  February, 
1864,  and  was  engaged  in  defending  the  Memphis  and 
Charleston  Railroad.  As  acting  inspector-general  of 
cavalry,  he  participated  in  the  siege  of  Atlanta,  Georgia, 
battle  of  Ezra  Church,  Georgia,  and  back  to  Nashville  ! 
with  General  Thomas,  taking  part  in  the  battle  of  Nash- 
ville, Tennessee,  in  December,  1864.  Received  the  bre- 
vets of  major,  lieutenant-colonel,  and  colonel,  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  during  the  war. 

Commanded  several  posts  in  the  Departments  of  Cali- 
fornia and  Columbia,  and  the  Districts  of  Nevada  and 


Summit  Lake,  assisting  materially  in  quelling  the  hostile 
Pi  Ute  Indian  disturbances  in  1866-67  and  1868. 

Went  from  Fort  McPherson  with  four  troops  of  the 
regiment  to  Montana  in  May,  June,  and  July,  1869.  Held 
a  council  with  the  Crow  Indians  and  distributed  goods 
to  them  on  the  Yellowstone  River  in  December,  1869. 
While  in  command  of  Fort  Steele  he  quieted  disturbances 
among  coal-miners  at  Carbon.  Sent  to  Fort  Sanders  in 
Wyoming,  and  from  there  in  1877,  with  six  more  troops 
of  the  Second  Cavalry,  to  Fort  Custer,  which  post  he 
helped  to  construct.  He  was  promoted  colonel  of  the 
Third  Cavalry. 

In  the  field  operating  against  the  Ute  Indians,  who 
had  massacred  Thornburg's  command,  a  portion  of  which 
belonged  to  his  regiment,  from  October  to  December, 
1879.  In  command  of  Fort  Laramie  and  of  Fort  Rus- 
sell, Wyoming,  from  July,  1879,  to  May,  1882,  when  he 
was  sent  to  Arizona  with  his  regiment  to  operate  against 
the  hostile  Apaches.  Met  the  head  men  of  the  Apaches 
in  council  at  Fort  Thomas,  Arizona,  in  May,  1882,  when 
they  made  their  grievances  known.  Was  in  command 
of  field  operations  against  the  Apaches  in  July  and  Au- 
gust, 1882. 

Superintendent  Mounted  Recruiting  Service  at  Jeffer- 
son Barracks,  Missouri,  from  October  1,  1882,  to  October 
1,  1884.  In  command  of  his  regiment  at  Whipple  Bar- 
racks, Arizona,  from  1884  to  March,  1885,  when  he 
marched  the  Third  Cavalry  through  Arizona,  New  Mexico, 
and  a  part  of  Chihuahua,  Mexico,  to  Fort  Davis,  Texas, 
and  in  command  of  that  post  from  May  12  to  October 
24,  1887,  when  he  took  command  of  Fort  Clark,  Texas, 
and  remained  there  until  January  9,  1890,  when  he 
marched  to  Fort  Mcintosh.  Was  retired  February  18, 
1 89 1.  Colonel  Brackett  is  the  author  of  "  Lane's  Brigade 
in  Central  Mexico,"  and  "  History  of  U.  S.  Cavalry." 


46 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  D.  L.  BRAINE. 

Rear-Admiral  D.  L.  Bkaine  was  born  in  New  York. 
Appointed  midshipman  from  Texas,  May  30,  1846. 
Served  during  the  Mexican  War  in  the  Home  Squadron, 
and  present  at  capture  of  Alvarado,  Tabasco,  Tuspan, 
Laguna,  Tampico,  and  Vera  Cruz.  In  1848  he  was  at- 
tached to  the  sloop-of-war  "John  Adams,"  of  the  Home 
Squadron.  During  1849-50  served  in  the  sloop-of-war 
"  St.  Mary's,"  of  the  East  India  Squadron.  In  1850-51 
in  the  steam-sloop  "Saranac,"  of  Home  Squadron.  At 
the  Naval  Academy  in  1852. 

Promoted  to  passed  midshipman  June  8,  1852,  and 
ordered  to  the  sloop-of-war  "  St.  Louis,"  of  the  Mediter- 
ranean Squadron,  where  he  remained  from  1853  to  1855. 
In  1855  he  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  master.  Com- 
missioned as  lieutenant  September  15,  1858.  During 
1856  and  1857  he  had  been  employed  upon  the  Coast 
Survey.  During  the  period  between  1858  and  i860  he 
served  on  the  coast  of  Africa  in  the  sloop-of-war  "  Vin- 
cennes." 

When  the  Civil  War  occurred  he  was  ordered  to  com- 
mand the  "  Monticello,"  of  the  North  Atlantic  Blockad- 
ing Squadron.  Had  an  engagement  with  the  rebel 
batter)'  at  Sewell's  Point,  Virginia,  May  19,  1861,  which 


lasted  for  more  than  an  hour,  and  was  the  first  naval  en- 
gagement of  the  war.  Present  at  the  attack  anil  capture 
of  Forts  Hatteras  and  Clark,  August,  1861,  and  October 
5,  1861.  Lieutenant  Braine  engaged  the  enemy  at  Kim- 
mekerk  Woods,  above  Cape  Hatteras,  and,  after  exchang- 
ing shots  with  their  gun-boats,  dispersed  two  regiments  of 
infantry,  sank  two  barges,  and  rescued  the  Twentieth 
Indiana  Regiment,  which  was  surrounded.  In  Novem- 
ber, 1 86 1,  Lieutenant  Braine  engaged  and  silenced  a  two- 
gun  battery  at  Inderal  Point,  North  Carolina,  and  dis- 
mounted one  of  the  guns.  It  must  be  remembered  that 
his  vessel  was  a  purchased  one. 

Commissioned  as  lieutenant-commander  Julv  15,  1S62. 
During  1862-64  numerous  engagements  with  Forts 
Fisher  and  Caswell.  Besides  the  "  Monticello,"  during 
this  period,  was  in  command  of  the  "  Vicksburg"  and 
"  Pequot."  Commanded  the  "  Pequot"  during  the  attacks 
upon  Fort  Fisher,  also  at  Fort  Anderson,  and  at  three 
other  forts  on  the  Cape  E'ear  River,  as  the  fleet  advanced 
to  Wilmington,  North  Carolina.  Lieutenant-Commander 
Braine  was  on  ordnance  duty  at  the  navy-yard  at  New 
York  in  1866-67.  Was  commissioned  commander  July 
25,  1 866,  and  commanded  the  steamer  "  Shamokin,"  of 
the  Brazil  Squadron,  during  1868.  Was  on  equipment 
duty  at  the  New  York  Navy- Yard,  1869-72.  Com- 
manded "  Juniata,"  European  station,  1874-75.  Commis- 
sioned as  captain  December  11,  1874.  Commanded 
reeeiving-ship  "  Colorado,"  1875-78.  Commanded  "  Pow- 
hatan," North  Atlantic  station,  1879-81.  Member  of 
Board  of  Inspection  and  Survey  1884-85.  Promoted 
commodore  March,  1885,  and  upon  special  duty  at  New 
York.    Promoted  rear-admiral  September  4,  1887.    Com- 

|  manded  the  South  Atlantic  station  1 886-88.  After  being 
again  on  special  duty,  Rear-Admiral  Braine  commanded 
the  navy-yard  at  New  York  in  1889-91.  He  was  retired 
by  operation  of  law  in  1891. 

While  Commander  Braine  was  in  the  "  Juniata,"  he 
went  north  to  look  for  the  "  Polaris,"  and  from  this  ship 

j  Lieutenant  De  Long  went  to  Cape  York  (latitude,  760 
north,)  in  the  steam-cutter. 

During  the  same  commission,  the  "Juniata"  received 
at  Santiago   de  Cuba  over  one   hundred   of  the  "  Vir- 

|  ginius's"  prisoners. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


47 


COLONEL  GEORGE  M.  BRAYTON. 

Colonel  George  M.  Brayton  was  born  in  Massa- 
chusetts February  24,  1834;  appointed  from  Ohio  (civil 
life)  as  a  first  lieutenant  Fifteenth  Infantry  May  14,  1861  ; 
promoted  to  captain  January  3,  1863;  transferred  to 
Thirty-third  Infantry  September  21,  1866,  and  again 
transferred  to  Eighth  Infantry  May  3,  1869;  commis- 
sioned major  Fifteenth  Infantry  February  6,  1882;  lieu- 
tenant-colonel Ninth  Infantry  September  6,  1886,  and 
colonel  Ninth  Infantry  in  1892. 

He  was  on  recruiting  duty  from  Jul}-,  1 86 1,  to  May, 
1862;  regimental  quartermaster  from  May,  1862,  to  Jan- 
uary, 1863,  from  whence  he  was  ordered  as  mustering 
and  disbursing  officer  at  Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania.  In 
October,  1863,  he  joined  his  regiment,  which  was  then 
in  the  field  at  Chattanooga,  Tennessee,  and  with  it  was  en- 
gaged in  the  battle  of  Missionary  Ridge  and  the  action 
at  Taylor's  Bridge,  Georgia.  For  gallant  and  meritorious 
services  at  Missionary  Ridge  he  was  brevetted  major 
U.  S  A.  He  again  acted  as  mustering  and  disbursing 
officer  at  Louisville,  Kentucky,  in  October,  1864,  and 
from  December,  1864,  to  May,  1865,  he  was  commanding 
Third  Battalion,  Fifteenth  Infantry;  provost-marshal 
District  of  Etowah  from  January  to  July,  1865;  as- 
sistant inspector-general  Department  of  Georgia  from 
August  to  December,  1865.  He  was  with  his  regiment 
from  January  to  May,  1S66.  From  May  to  July,  1866, 
he  commanded  Batteries  Gladden  and  Mcintosh,  Mobile 
Bay,  and  from  July,  1866,  to  January,  1867,  he  com- 
manded Fort  Morgan,  Alabama.  On  being  transferred 
to  the  Thirty-third  Infantry  lie  joined  company  at  Macon, 


Georgia,  from  whence  he  did  service  to  Atlanta,  and  post 
at  Augusta  ;  in  Montgomery,  Alabama  ;  Huntsville,  Ala- 
bama ;  Selma,  Alabama  ;  Fort  Macon,  North  Carolina; 
Columbia  and  Newbury,  South  Carolina.  In  October, 
1870,  he  was  ordered  north  to  David's  Island,  New  York 
harbor,  and  remained  there  until  he  was  transferred  West 
to  Fort  Rice,  Dakota.  From  August  to  October,  1872, 
Colonel  Brayton  was  on  Yellowstone  Expedition  to 
escort  surveying  party  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad 
from  Fort  Rice  west  to  Yellowstone  River,  Montana,  and 
return.  After  completion  of  this  he  was  ordered  to  Fort 
Russell,  Utah,  and  then  to  join  his  regiment  in  Depart- 
ment of  Arizona. 


48 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD  NAVY  {regular) 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL    AND    BREVET   BRIGADIER- 
GENERAL   SAMUEL    BRECK. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  and  Brevet  Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Samuel  Breck  (Adjutant-General's  Department) 
was  born  at  Middleborough,  Plymouth  County,  Massa- 
chusetts, February  25,  1834  (eighth  generation  from 
Edward  Breck,  who  came  to  Dorchester,  Massachusetts, 
from  Ashton,  England,  in  1635).  He  was  graduated 
from  the  Military  Academy  July  1,  1855;  promoted  to 
brevet  second  lieutenant  of  artillery  and  second  lieutenant, 
First  Artillery,  same  day. 

He  served  in  the  Florida  hostilities  against  the  Semi- 
nole Indians  in  1855-56,  and  then  was  in  garrison  at 
Fort  Moultrie,  South  Carolina,  and  Fort  McHenry, 
Maryland,  to  1859,  when  he  was  transferred  to  duty  in 
the  Southwest,  and  marched  from  Helena,  Arkansas,  to 
Fort  Clark,  Texas,  during  the  same  year.  He  then 
returned  to  duty  at  Fort  Moultrie,  South  Carolina,  where 
he  remained  until  i860,  when  he  was  detailed  at  the 
Military  Academy  as  assistant  professor  of  geography, 
history,  and  ethics  to  April  26,  1861,  and  then  became 


principal  assistant  professor  of  geography,  history,  and 
ethics,  which  position  he  occupied  to  December  3,  1861, 
in  the  mean  time  having  again  been  promoted  first  lieu- 
tenant, First  Artillery,  April  11,  186 1,  which  grade  he 
held  to  February  20,  1862.  He  was  appointed  captain 
and  assistant  adjutant-general  November  29,  1861,  and 
served  in  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  from  186 1  to  1866, 
being  assistant  adjutant-general  of  General  McDowell's 
division  (Army  of  the  Potomac)  in  the  defences  of 
Washington,  D.  C,  to  March  24,  1862,  when  he  took 
the  field  as  assistant  adjutant-general  of  the  First  Army 
Corps  and  of  the  Department  of  the  Rappahannock, 
being  engaged  in  the  "occupation  of  Fredericksburg, 
Virginia,"  April  18,  1862,  and  in  the  "expedition  to  the 
Shenandoah  Valley,"  to  intercept  the  retreat  of  the  rebel 
forces  under  General  Jackson,  May  and  June,  1862. 

Captain  Breck  was  appointed  major  and  additional  aide- 
de-camp  May  2^,  1862,  and  major  and  assistant  adjutant- 
general  July  17,  1862,  and  ordered  to  duty  in  the  adjutant- 
general's  office  at  Washington,  D.  C,  where  he  remained 
until  1869,  in  charge  of  rolls,  returns,  books,  blanks,  and 
business  pertaining  to  the  enlisted  men  of  the  regular 
and  volunteer  forces,  and  of  the  records  of  discontinued 
commands  and  the  preparation  and  publication  of  the 
"  Volunteer  Army  Register." 

At  the  close  of  the  war  he  was  made  brevet  lieutenant- 
xolonel  September  24,  1864,  "  for  meritorious  and  faithful 
services  during  the  Rebellion;"  brevet  colonel  March  1  3, 
1865,  "for  diligent,  faithful,  and  meritorious  services  in 
the  Adjutant- General's  Department  during  the  Rebel- 
lion;" brevet  brigadier-general,  U.S.A.,  March  13,  1S65, 
"  for  diligent,  faithful,  and  meritorious  services  in  the 
Adjutant-General's  Department  during  the  Rebellion." 

Since  1870  General  Breck  has  had  extended  service 
throughout  the  country,  his  posts  of  duty  having  been 
in  California,  New  York,  Washington,  D.  C,  Minnesota, 
Nebraska,  and  again  at  Washington,  D.  C,  where  he  is 
now  on  duty. 

He  was  appointed  lieutenant-colonel  and  assistant 
adjutant-general  February  28,  1887. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


49 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  JOSEPH   CABELL   BRECKIN- 
RIDGE. INSPECTOR-GENERAL,  U.S.A. 

Brigadier-General  Joseph  Cabell  Breckinridge 
was  born  at  Baltimore  January  14,  1842.  The  son  of  the 
eminent  theologian,  Robert  Jefferson  Breckinridge,  and 
grandson  of  Senator  John  Breckinridge,  attorney-general 
under  Jefferson,  he  is,  through  his  mother,  descended  from 
General  Francis  Preston  and  General  William  Campbell, 
"the  hero  of  King's  Mountain."  Educated  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Virginia,  he  abandoned  the  study  of  law  to 
join  General  Nelson,  and  August  26,  1861,  became  acting 
assistant  adjutant-general  of  his  force.  General  George 
H.  Thomas,  succeeding  to  the  command,  appointed  him 
an  aide-de-camp.  He  was  present  at  the  repulse  and 
overthrow  of  Zollicoffer  at  Mill  Spring,  Kentucky,  re- 
ceiving mention  from  Thomas,  and  the  campaign  through 
Nashville  to  Shiloh.  At  Corinth  he  received,  as  a  re- 
ward of  gallantry  at  Mill  Spring,  a  commission  in  Bat- 
tery B,  Second  (regular)  Artillery,  dated  April  14,  1862. 
With  his  battery  he  was  at  Forts  Pickens  and  Barrancas, 
and  Pensacola,  and  joined  the  Army  of  the  Tennessee 
before  Atlanta.  When  McPherson  was  killed,  July  22. 
1864,  he  was  captured  and  sent  to  Charleston  to  be  ex- 
posed to  the  fire  of  Union  guns.  Exchanged  in  a  special 
cartel,  he  reached  home  broken  in  health,  and  served  as 
mustering  officer  till  the  close  of  the  war.  He  was  bre- 
vetted  captain  July  26,  1864,  and  major  March  13,  1865, 
"  for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  in  front  of  At- 
lanta," and  "  during  the  war." 

After  the  war  lie  went  with  his  regiment  from  Fort 
Mc Henry  to  California  via  the  Isthmus  of  Panama.  In 
1870  he  became  adjutant  of  the  Artillery  School  at  Fort 
Monroe.  Promoted  to  a  captaincy  June  17,  1874.  he 
was  assigned  to  the  command  of  Fort  Foote,  and  in  1877 
of  the  artillery  troops  at  Washington  Arsenal.  Promoted 
in  1 88 1  major  and  assistant  inspector-general,  and  or- 
dered to  the  Pacific  coast,  where  he  served  successively 
on  the  staffs  of  Generals  McDowell,  Schofield,  and  Pope, 
until  1885,  when  he  was  transferred  to  the  Military  Di- 
vision of  the  Missouri,  on  the  staffs  of  Generals  Scho- 
field and  Terry.  During  the  summer  of  1 8S4  he  received 
leave  for  a  year,  which  he  spent  in  foreign  travel  and  in 
the  stud\r  of  the  armies  of  Europe.  Pie  was  successively 
promoted  to  be  lieutenant-colonel  and  colonel,  and  in 
1889  inspector-general  of  the  army,  with  the  rank  of 
brigadier-general. 

Since  he  was  senior  inspector-general  of  the  army  an 


unusual  number  of  changes  have  occurred,  requiring  great 
and  exacting  labor  from  him  and  improving  the  efficiency 
of  the  army.  Thus,  G.  O.  No.  50,  A.  G.  O.  1889,  for- 
bids unnecessary  military  performance  and  inspection  on 
Sunday;  the  Army  Regulations  of  18S9  improve  the 
post  schools  ;  G.  O.  No.  15,  1890,  improve  the  instruction 
in  colleges  where  officers  of  the  army  are  detailed  ;  a 
regular  officer  was  named  in  [891,  for  the  first  time,  to 
inspect  and  instruct  the  militia  camp  of  every  State  in  the 
Union ;  all  inspections  were  applied  equally  to  every 
branch  of  the  service;  G.  O.  No.  1  1,  A.  G.  O.  1891,  re- 
duced the  delay  in  receiving  post-inspection  reports 
about  one-half,  and  gave  increased  promptness  and  thor- 
oughness to  remedial  action  ;  every  effort  is  being  made 
to  get  younger  and  better  men,  and  horses,  and  rations, 
and  establish  gymnasiums,  riding-halls,  and  soldiers'  in- 
stitutes ;  and  all  unnecessary  restrictions  upon  the  legal 
rights  of  enlisted  men  have  been  removed,  and  the 
number  of  articles  kept  for  sale  at  army  posts  has  been 
doubled;  the  allowance  of  baggage  has  been  increased, 
and  an  increased  allowance  of  quarters  has  been  recom- 
mended. 

In  personal  appearance  General  Breckinridge  is  a 
typical  Kentuckian,  and  well  sustains  the  standard  of  the 
Inspector-General's  Department  for  soldierly  bearing  ;  he 
is  six  feet  in  height,  of  athletic  build  and  striking  pres- 
ence, possessing  the  conversational  powers  for  which  his 
family  are  justly  famous,  and  his  flow  of  wit  and  anecdote 
is  unfailing. 


So 


OFFICERS    OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   KIDDER   RANDOLPH   BREESE,   U.S.N. 

Captain  Kidder  Randolph  Bkeese,  U.S.N.,  was  born 
in  Philadelphia.  Appointed  midshipman  November  6, 
1846,  from  Rhode  Island;  February,  1 847,  was  ordered 
to  the  "Saratoga,"  Commander  Farragut,  and  served  in 
heron  the  Mexican  coast  during  the  war.  In  the  spring 
of  1S4S  ordered  to  the  frigate  "  Brandywine ;"  served  in 
the  "  Brandywine"  until  the  expiration  of  her  cruise, 
December,  1850.  February,  1S51,  joined  the  frigate 
"  St.  Laurence,"  then  loading  at  New  York'  with  articles 
for  the  World's  Fair,  at  London,  and  made  that  cruise  in 
her,  returning  in  September,  1X51.  Passed  midshipman 
June,  1852,  and  was  ordered  to  the  "  Mississippi,"  flag- 
ship of  Commodore  M.  C.  Pern-,  commanding  japan 
Expedition.  On  the  return  of  the  "  Mississippi"  to  the 
United  States,  in  June,  1S55,  was  detached  and  granted 
leave.  In  July  was  ordered  on  Coast  Survey  duty,  and 
was  engaged  on  that  work  until  August,  185S.  Was  then 
ordered  to  the  "Preble,"  on  the  Paraguay  Expedition, 
serving  in  that  expedition  and  afterwards  on  the  Mos- 
quito coast,  off  Greytown,  until  September,  1859,  when 
he  was  invalided  home  with  Isthmus  fever.  December, 
i860,  was  ordered  to  the  "  Portsmouth,"  on  the  coast  of 
Africa.  Served  on  board  the  "  Portsmouth"  until  August, 
i860,  when  he  joined  the  "  San  Jacinto."  Remained  on 
board  the  "San  Jacinto"  until  the  expiration  of  her  cruise, 


December,  1S61,  during  which  upward  of  fifteen  hundred 
slaves  were  captured  on  the  coast  of  Africa,  and  Messrs. 
Slidell  and  Mason  were  taken  from  the  "  Trent."  Decem- 
ber, 1S61,  was  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  Third  Di- 
vision of  Porter's  Mortar  Flotilla,  and  participated  in  the 
attack  on  New  Orleans  and  Vicksburg,  in  1862.  Was 
recommended  for  promotion  by  Captain  Porter  for  ser- 
vices at  this  time.  July,  l862,was  made  lieutenant-com- 
mander upon  the  establishment  of  that  grade.  October, 
1862,  joined  Admiral  Porter  in  the  Mississippi  Squadron, 
and  took  command  of  his  flag-ship,  the  "  Black  Hawk." 
Served  in  that  capacity  during  Admiral  Porter's  com- 
mand, and  was  present  or  connected  with  all  the  most 
important  operations  on  the  Mississippi  River  and  its 
tributaries  during  that  officer's  command.  At  the  close 
of  the  Red  River  Expedition  was  recommended,  with 
certain  other  commanding  officers,  for  promotion  to 
commander.  On  Admiral  Porter  being  ordered,  in  Sep- 
tember, 1864,  to  command  the  North  Atlantic  Blockad- 
ing Squadron,  was  selected  by  him  as  his  fleet-captain, 
and  served  in  that  capacity  until  May,  1865,  when  hos- 
tilities ceased.  As  fleet-captain  was  in  both  engagements 
at  Fort  Fisher,  and  in  the  subsequent  operations  in  Cape 
Fear  River.  Commanded  the  sailors  and  marines  in  the 
naval  assault  on  Fort  Fisher,  and  was  recommended  by 
Admiral  Porter  for  immediate  promotion  for  services  on 
that  occasion.  August,  1865,  was  ordered  to  the  Naval 
Academy,  and  served  there  until  September,  1866,  as 
assistant  to  the  superintendent,  Admiral  Porter.  June, 
1867,  to  the  Washington  Navy-Yard,  as  inspector  of 
ordnance.  July,  1869,  was  detached  from  the  navy-yard. 
June  29,  1870,  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  "  Ply- 
mouth," European  Squadron.  Detached  from  "Plymouth" 
in  October,  1872.  December,  1S72,  ordered  to  duty  in 
the  Bureau  oft  )rdnance,  Navy  Department,  and  in  June, 
1873,  to  the  Naval  Academy,  as  commandant  of  mid- 
shipmen. Commissioned  as  captain  August  9,  1874,  and 
in  November,  1874,  was,  at  his  own  request,  detached 
from  the  Naval  Academy.  In  January,  1875,  ordered  to 
report  to  the  superintendent  of  the  Coast  Survey  for  duty 
as  hydrographic  inspector,  and  in  June,  1875,  was  de- 
tached and  ordered  to  the  command  of  Torpedo  station, 
Newport,  Rhode  Island,  where  he  served  until  1879. 
Commanding  "  Pensacola,"  Pacific  station,  1879-S0. 
Died  September  15,  1881. 


J 1 7/0   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


Si 


CAPTAIN   HENRY   F.   BREWERTON. 

Captain  Henry  I1'.  Brewerton  (Fifth  Artillery)  was 
born  in  New  York  June  30,  1838,  and  entered  the  mili- 
tary service  from  civil  life,  having  been  appointed  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Fifth  U.  S.  Artillery  May  14,  186 1.  He 
was  assigned  to  Light  Batter}-  K,  and  was  at  the  Light- 
Artillery  School  of  Instruction  at  Camp  Cameron,  Penn- 
sylvania,  and  with  the  Artillery  Reserve  of  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac  until  January,  1862,  when  he  was  made 
signal  officer  of  the  Artillery  Brigade,  and  served  in  that 
capacity  to  March,  1862,  at  which  time  he  was  promoted 
first  lieutenant.  He  was  then  detailed  on  recruiting  ser- 
vice, and  on  mustering  and  disbursing  duty,  and  assistant 
commissary  of  musters  of  the  Department  of  the  Sus- 
quehanna to  July,  1864.  Joining  Light  Battery  B,  Fifth 
Artillery,  at  Cumberland,  Maryland,  he  served  with  it  to 
October,  1866. 

Captain  Brewerton  participated  in  the  Peninsula  cam- 
paign from  Manassas  (including  siege  of  Yorktown, 
Williamsburg  to  Chickahominy),  and  in  command  of 
section  of  light  artillery  protecting  passage  of  troops 
during  battles  of  Fair  ( )aks  and  Seven  Pines,  and  during 
battles  of  seven  days  (Gaines'  Mill,  Mechanicsville,  and 
Malvern  Hill)  with  Horse  Batten-  C,  Third  Artillery, 
under  General  Stoneman.  He  commanded  a  section 
covering  the  retreat  of  the  army  with  General  Averell  ; 
he  commanded  a  section  of  Horse  Battery  C,  Third 
Artillery,  at  White  Oak  Swamp  and  White  Oak  Swamp 
Bridge  ;  he  was  witli  General  Sheridan  in  the  Shenandoah 
campaign  and  commanded  Light  Battery  B,  Fifth  Artil- 
lery, but  was  captured  October  19,  1S64,  and  prisoner  of 
war  in  Libby  Prison,  Virginia,  from  October,  1864,  to 
April,  1S65,  exchanged.  At  the  termination  of  the  war 
he  received  the  brevet  of  captain,  to  date  from  October 
19,  1864,  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the 
battle  of  Cedar  Creek,  Virginia,"  and  was  promoted 
captain  September  18,  1868. 

He  served  from  1866  to  1873  at  Fort  Monroe,  Vir- 
ginia ;  Camp  Williams,  Richmond,  Va.  ;  Fort  Jefferson, 
Dry  Tortugas,  Fla. ;  Fort  Preble,  Maine  ;  and  St.  Al- 
bans, New  York,  during  the  Fenian  raid,  and  was  on 
special  duty  at  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  under  the  orders 
of  the  major-general  commanding  the  division,  and  was 
transferred,  in  1873,  to  the  light  battery  of  the  regiment 
at  Fort  Adams,  Rhode  Island.  His  station  was  changed 
in  February,  1875,  to  Charleston,  South  Carolina,  and  in 
1877  was  detailed  to  proceed  to  Louisville,  Kentucky,  to 
purchase    horses  for    light-artillery  service.     This   kept 


him  until  July,  187S,  when  he  was  ordered  to  Atlanta, 
Georgia.  In  July,  188 1,  Captain  Brewerton  was  detailed 
as  a  member  of  the  Light- Artillery  Board  at  Washington, 
D.C.,  which  duty  was  completed  in  September  of  the 
same  year,  when  he  rejoined  his  battery  at  McPherson 
Barracks,  Atlanta.  On  December  6,  1 88 1 ,  he  was  ordered 
to  Fort  Hamilton,  New  York,  in  command  of  Light  Bat- 
tery F,  from  which  he  was  relieved  and  transferred  to 
Batten-  C,  at  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  as  instructor  at  the 
Artillery  School,  December  19,  1882.  He  was  trans- 
ferred at  his  own  request  from  Battery  C  to  Battery  K, 
January  10,  1883,  at  Fort  Schuyler,  New  York,  and 
assumed  command  of  the  last-named  battery  eight  days 
later. 

Upon  the  transfer  of  the  Fifth  Artillery  to  the  Pacific 
coast  in  1889,  Captain  Brewerton  was  stationed  at  the 
Presidio  of  San  Francisco,  in  command  of  Battery  K, 
and  was  recorder  of  a  Retiring  Board  at  New  York  City 
in  1 89 1.  He  was  placed  on  special  duty  in  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  East  in  1892,  where  he  is  now  located. 

While  a  lieutenant,  he  was  acting  regimental  quarter- 
master in  1861  ;  adjutant  of  the  Artillery  Reserve  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac  to  January,  1862;  battalion  ad- 
jutant of  the  Fifth  Artillery,  acting  assistant  adjutant-gen- 
eral, and  inspector-general  at  Fort  Monroe  from  1867  to 
1869.  He  commanded  the  post  at  Fort  Preble,  Maine, 
in  1870,  and  a  battalion  of  the  Fifth  Artillery  at  St. 
Albans,  Vermont,  during  the  Fenian  raids,  as  well  as 
McPherson  Barracks,  Georgia,  from  November  12  to 
December  6,  1881. 


52 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {Regular. 


COMMANDER  JOHN  J.   BRICE. 

Commander  John  J.  Brice  entered  the  volunteer  navy 
in  August,  1 86 r ,  at  the  commencement  of  the  Civil  War. 
His  fust  orders  were  to  the  U.  S.  steamer  "  Freeborn," 
Potomac  flotilla;  afterwards  commanded  the  schooner 
"Bailey,"  the  captured  .steamer  "Eureka,"  the  "Prim- 
rose," and  at  the  end  of  the  war  commanded  the  U.  S. 
steamer  "Don."  He  was  twice  promoted  for  gallant 
conduct,  and  transferred  to  the  regular  navy  in  1868.  He 
took  part  in  the  following  engagements  and  expeditions: 

Engagement  with  the  Shipping  Point  batteries  on  the 
Potomac  River  in  1861  ;  expedition  upon  Yorktown  in 
1862;  attack  upon  the  Acquia  Creek  batteries;  engage- 
ment with  rebel  batteries  at  Belle  Plains;  landing  expe- 
dition at  Matthias's  Point,  Potomac  River;  cutting-out 
expedition,  Piankatank  River,  Virginia,  1S62;  Glouces- 
ter batteries,  Rappahannock  River,  1862;  Jones's  Bluff 
batteries,    Rappahannock    River,   1S64;  boat    expedition 


on  the  Rappahannock  River  in  1864;  at  the  capture  of 
Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  in  1862  ;  cutting-out  expedition 
on  Maddox  Creek,  1864;  landing  expedition,  Maddox 
Creek,  and  engagements  with  guerillas  in  1864;  cutting- 
out  expedition  to  Mill  Point;  engagements  with  Cockpit 
Point  batteries  in  1861  ;  running  the  Potomac  River  bat- 
teries at  night  in  November,  1 86 1 ,  and  January,  1862; 
attack  upon  Smith  Point  batteries  on  the  Potomac  River 
in  1862;  attack  of  rebel  rams,  James  River,  1865  ;  cutting- 
out  expedition,  Wicomico  River,  in  1863;  with  Grant's 
army  during  the  battles  of  the  Wilderness  and  Spott- 
sylvania,  protecting  the  submarine  telegraph  and  the 
wounded. 

lie  joined  the  U.S.  steamer  "  De  Soto"  in  1865,  and 
made  a  cruise  in  the  West  Indies.  In  1867  he  was 
ordered  to  the  U.  S.  steam-sloop  "  Quinnebaug,"  and 
served  in  that  vessel  in  the  South  Atlantic  Squadron  until 
1S70.  He  was  stationed  at  the  Hydrographic  ( )ffice, 
in  Washington,  after  his  return,  but  in  August  of  that 
year  was  ordered  to  the  U.  S.  steamer  "  Saco,"  of  the 
European  Squadron, — being  afterwards  transferred  to  the 
"Franklin."  In  1872  he  was  at  the  Torpedo  School  at 
Newport.  In  1873  lie  was  attached  to  the  U.  S.  steamer 
"  Richmond,"  of  the  Pacific  fleet,  and  was  transferred  to 
the  U.  S.  steamer  "  Saranac,"  being  attached  to  that 
vessel  when  she  was  wrecked,  at  Vancouver,  in  June, 
1875.  During  1S76  he  was  on  duty  at  the  Naval  Ob- 
servatory, in  Washington,  and,  in  1878,  was  ordered  to 
the  navy-yard  at  Mare  Island.  After  making  a  cruise 
in  the"  Lackawanna"  in  the  Pacific,  he  again  returned  to 
duty  at  Mare  Island,  whence  he  was  sent  to  the  Isthmus 
of  Panama,  during  the  operations  of  the  U.  S.  forces  in 
keeping  the  transit  open.  In  18S5  he  was  ordered  to  the 
"Iroquois,"  of  the  Pacific  Squadron.  In  18S8  he  took 
the  course  at  the  Naval  War  College  at  Newport  ;  and 
in  1889  was  stationed  at  the  navy-yard,  Washington.  In 
1890  he  was  ordered  to  duty  upon  the  United  States  Fish 
Commission. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   C/J IL    WAR. 


53 


PAYMASTER-GF.NERAI.   HORATIO  BRIDGE,  U.S.N. 

(RETIRED.) 

Paymaster-General  Horatio  Bridge,  U.S.N,  (re- 
tired), was  born  in  Augusta,  Maine,  April  S,  1S06.  He 
was  educated  at  Bowdoin  College,  and  graduated  in  the 
class  of  1825.  He  studied  law  at  the  Northampton  Law 
School,  and  practised  it  at  Augusta  for  a  few  years  ;  then 
left  the  legal  profession  ami  entered  the  navy  February 
19,  1838,  as  purser. 

May  3,  1838,  he  was  ordered  to  the  sloop-of-war 
"  Cyane,"  and  made  a  cruise  of  three  years  in  the  Mediter- 
ranean. December  7,  1843,  he  was  ordered  to  the  sloop- 
of-war  "Saratoga,"  and  made  a  cruise  of  two  years  on 
the  west  coast  of  Africa,  on  returning  from  which  he 
published  the  "Journal  of  an  African  Cruiser." 

April  1,  1845,  he  was  ordered  to  the  navy-yard  at 
Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire. 

April  9,  1846,  he  was  ordered  to  the  frigate  "United 
States,"  the  flag-ship  of  Commodore  Read,  and  made  a 
three  years'  cruise  on  the  African  and  European  stations. 

July  17,  1849,  he  was  ordered  to  the  navy-yard,  Ports- 
mouth, New  Hampshire. 

November  6,  1851,  he  was  ordered  to  the  sloop-of- 
war  "  Portsmouth,"  of  the  Pacific  Squadron,  from  which 
vessel  he  was  detached  December  3,  1853,  and  ordered 
home. 

September  21,  1854,  he  was  appointed  chief  of  the 
Bureau  of  Provisions  ami  Clothing. 

April  8,  1 868,  he  was  transferred  to  the  retired  list, 
with  the  title  of  paymaster-general  and  relative  rank  of 
commodore. 


April  8,  1869,  he  resigned  as  chief  of  bureau. 

July  6,  1869,  he  was  appointed  chief  inspector  of  pro- 
visions and  clothing. 

February  8,  1873,  he  was  detached  from  duty,  under 
the  provision  of  law  prohibiting  the  employment  of  navy 
officers  on  the  retired  list  except  in  time  of  war. 

Paymaster-General  Bridge  now  resides  at  "  The  Moor- 
ings," Athens,  Pennsylvania. 

He  is  well  known  as  an  accomplished  writer  and  most 
capable  officer,  who  enjoyed  the  intimacy  and  confidence 
of  the  different  Presidents  and  Secretaries  under  whom 
he  served  so  long  in  his  most  responsible  position. 


54 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY    regular) 


CAPTAIN   HENRY    K.   BRINKERHOFF. 

Captain  Henry  R.  Brinkerhoff  (Fifteenth  Infantry) 
was  born  in  Ohio  October  9.  1S36.  He  entered  the  vol- 
unteer service  in  the  early  days  of  the  Rebellion,  as  first 
lieutenant  of  the  Thirtieth  1  Ihio  Infantry,  August  29, 
1861,  and   participated    in   the   Vicksburg    campaign  of 


1863,  being  engaged  in  the  siege,  assaults,  and  capture  of 
Vicksburg,  Mississippi,  June,  and  July  of  that  year. 

He  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the  Thirtieth  Ohio 
Infantry  July  26,  1863,  in  order  to  accept  the  lieutenant- 
colonelcy  of  the  Fifty-second  U.S.  Colored  Troops  July 
27,  and  with  his  regiment  participated  in  the  Maryland 
campaign  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  being  engaged 
in  the  battles  of  South  Mountain  ami  Antietam,  Mary- 
land, September  15,  16,  and  17,  1862,  and  in  the  actions 
of  Coleman's  Cross-Roads,  Mississippi,  in  1S64. 

He  was  in  the  Department  of  the  South,  with  colored 
troops,  from  this  time  until  1S66.  He  resigned  June  20, 
[865,  but  was  reappointed  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Fifty- 
second  U.  S.  Colored  Infantry  September  16,  1S65,  from 
which  he  was  honorably  mustered  out  May  5,  1866. 

Colonel  Brinkerhoff  then  entered  the  regular  service, 
by  receiving  the  appointment  of  second  lieutenant  of  the 
Fifteenth  U.S.  Infantry.  lime  3,  1867,  and  served  with 
his  regiment  in  the  Department  of  the  South,  in  Texas, 
New  Mexico,  and  Dakota,  at  various  stations.  He  was 
promoted  first  lieutenant  November  7,  1867,  and  captain 
September  iS,  187S.  Since  joining  his  regiment  lie  has 
participated  in  its  movements,  both  by  rail- and  wagon- 
road,  and  is  at  present  stationed  at  Fort  Sheridan, 
Illinois. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


55 


CAPTAIN    AND   BREVET   LIEUTENANT-COLONEL 
HENRY   B.   BRISTOL  (retired). 

Captain  and  Brevet  Lieutenant-Colonel  Henry 
B.  Bristol  was  born  in  Detroit,  Michigan,  April  25, 
1S38.  Me  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the  Fifth 
Infantry,  May  15,  1S57,  from  civil  life.  He  participated 
in  the  expedition  to  Utah  under  Colonel  Albert  Sydney 
Johnson  in  1857.  He  was  at  Fort  Bridger  in  1858,  and 
Camp  Floyd,  Utah,  in  1859.  He  was  promoted  first 
lieutenant  May  13,  1861,  and  captain  June  1,  1861.  He 
served  during  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  and  was  employed 
in  scouting  on  the  Spanish  trail  to  New  Mexico,  and 
then  stationed  at  Fort  Marcy,  Albuquerque,  and  Fort 
Defiance,  when  he  participated  in  the  Navajo  campaign, 
and  scouting  the  San  Juan  country  and  Chasco  Valley. 
Then  he  was  at  Forts  Craig  and  Union.  He  was  en- 
gaged with  Confederates  at  Los  Perios.  He  pursued 
the  hostile  Texans  down  the  Rio  Grande  to  Fort 
Sumner. 

He  was  appointed  military  superintendent  of  Navajo 
Indians  at  Bosque  Redondo  Reservation,  and  was  acting 
commissary  of  subsistence  and  agent  until  1866. 

Captain  Bristol  was  brevetted  March  13,  1S65,  as 
major,  for  "  faithful  and  meritorious  services  in  New 
Mexico;"  and  lieutenant-colonel  for  "  faithful  and  meri- 
torious services  in  New  Mexico,  and  particularly  for  his 
untiring  zeal  and  energy  in  controlling  the  Navajo  tribe 
of  Indians  at  the  Bosque  Redondo  Reservation,  and  for 
his  praiseworthy  efforts  in  advancing  their  condition  from 
that  of  savages  to  that  of  civilized  men." 


In  1S66  Captain  Bristol  was  detailed  on  recruiting  ser- 
vice in  New  York  harbor,  anil  Detroit,  Michigan,  in 
1867.  He  was  then  stationed  at  Bedloe's  Island,  and 
was  employed  in  conducting  recruits  to  San  Francisco, 
and  returned  to  Chicago  on  recruiting  duty  in  1868. 
1  [e  was  at  Fort  Reynolds,  California,  in  1869  ;  Forts  Har- 
ker,  Larned,  and  Dodge  to  1871,  and  then  was  employed 
along  the  line  of  the  Atchison,  Topeka  and  Santa  Fe  Rail- 
way, west  to  the  Colorado  line,  engaged  in  the  Comanche 
campaign.  He  was  also  engaged  in  the  Sioux  campaign, 
and  at  Fort  Keogh,  Montana,  from  1877  to  date  of  re- 
tirement, March  20,  1879. 


56 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (.regular) 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  JOHN   R.  BROOKE. 

Brigadier-General  John  R.  Brooke  was  burn  in 
Pennsylvania  July  21,  183S.  He  entered  the  military 
service  at  the  commencement  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion 
as  captain  in  the  Fourth  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infan- 
try April  20,  1861,  and  was  appointed  colonel  of  the 
Fifty-third  Pennsylvania  Volunteers  November  7,  1X61, 
serving  in  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  1861- 
65  ;  he  was  in  command  of  his  regiment  in  the  campaign 
commencing  March  10,  1862,  from  the  defences  of  Wash- 
ington to  the  Rappahannock'  River,  Virginia;  returning 
to  Alexandria,  Virginia,  thence  by  transport  ships  to 
Ship  Point,  York  River  Bay;  was  in  the  campaign  cul- 
minating in  the  Seven  Days' Battles  before  Richmond, 
Virginia;  he  was  in  the  second  Bull  Rim  and  Antietam 
campaigns,  August  and  September,  1862  ;  in  advance  of 
reconnoissance  from  Harper's  Ferry  to  Charlestown, 
Virginia,  October,  1862  ;  in  Fredericksburg  campaign  to 
December,  1S62;  in  Chancellorsville  campaign,  May, 
1863;  in  Gettysburg  campaign  to  Jul)-,  1 S63  ;  in  cam- 
paign (October,  1863)  resulting  in  the  effort  of  Lee  to 
turn  the  right  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  during  which 
occurred  the  combats  at  Auburn  Mills  and  Bristoe  Sta- 
tion ;  following  this,  late  in  November,  was  the  Mine- 
Run  campaign,  with  several  combats  and  skirmishes;  in 
camp  at   Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania,  from   December  29, 

1863,  to  March  26,  1864;  in  the  Wilderness  campaign 
of  1864  to  Cold  Harbor,  Virginia,  when  he  was  severely 
wounded  and  granted  leave  of  absence  to  September  16, 

1864.  Colonel  Brooke  then  received  the  commission  of 
brigadier-general  of  volunteers  "for  distinguished  ser- 
vices during  the  recent  battles  of  the  Old  Wilderness 
and  Spottsylvania  Court-House,  Virginia."  During  the 
war  he  participated  in  the  siege  of  Yorktown,  battles  of 
Fair  Oaks  (wounded),  second  Bull  Run,  Antietam,  Fred- 


ericksburg,   Chancellorsville,    Gettysburg     (wounded) ; 
skirmishes  at   Bank's   Ford   of  the  Rappahannock  and 
Thoroughfare  Gap,  Virginia,  as  well  as  a   skirmish   at 
Falling  Water,  where  part  of  Lee's  army  crossed   the 
Potomac,  after  Gettysburg;   combats  at   Auburn    Mills 
and  Bristoe  Station  ;  several  combats  and  skirmishes  in 
the  Mine  Run  campaign,  November,  1863  ;  battle  in  the 
Old  Wilderness  ;  combats  on  the  Po  River;  successful  as- 
sault of"  Salient"  at  Spottsylvania  Court-House,  and  again 
May  16,  1S64,  capturing  on  May  12  a  large  number  of 
prisoners  and  man}-  pieces  of  artillery  ;  combats  at  North 
Anna  and  Tolopotomy  ;  assault  of  enemy's  works  at  Cold 
Harbor,  at  daylight  on  June  3,  1864,  during  which  Colo- 
nel Brooke's  command  penetrated  the  works  and  he  was 
severely  wounded.     Colonel  Brooke  exercised  the  com- 
mand of  a  brigade  on  numerous  occasions  during  the 
war  while  a  colonel,  and   commanded  a  special  detach- 
ment of  five  regiments  of   infantry,  three  regiments  of 
cavalry,  and  two  batteries  of  artillery,  the  advance  of  a 
reconnoissance  commanded  by  General    Hancock-,  from 
Harper's  Ferry,  Virginia,  to  Charlestown,  Virginia,  Octo- 
ber,   1S62;  camp  of  veteran   volunteers  at   Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania,  December  29,  1863,  to  March  26,  1864;  on 
recovering  from   the  wounds   received  at  Cold   Harbor, 
Colonel  Brooke  was  detailed  on  special   duty  to   March 
1  i,  1865,  at  which  time  he  joined  his  command  in  the 
Army  of  the  Shenandoah,  where  he  remained  until  Au- 
gust 10,  1865,  when  he  was  placed  on  court-martial  duty 
to  February  1,  1S66,  when  he  resigned  from  the  service. 
On  the  28th  of  July,  1866,  General   Brooke  was  ap- 
pointed  lieutenant-colonel   of  the   Thirty-seventh  L\  S. 
Infantry,  and  was  made  brevet  colonel,  U.  S.  A.,  March 
2,  iSf>7,  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle 
of  Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania;"   brevet  brigadier-general 
U.  S.  A.,  March  2,  1S67,  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices  in   the  battle  of  Spottsylvania   Court-House,  Vir- 
ginia;" brevet  major-general  of  volunteers  August  1,  18114, 
"for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battles  of  Tolo- 
potomy and  Cold  Harbor,  Virginia."     Proceeding  to  the 
plains,  he  served  at  various  stations  in  the  West  until 
transferred  to  the  Third  U.  S.  Infantry  March  15,  1869, 
whereupon  he  joined  his  regiment  at  Holly  Springs,  Mis- 
sissippi, serving   in   the  neighborhood  of   New  Orleans 
until  ordered  with   his  regiment  to  Pennsylvania  during 
the  labor  riots  of  1877,  upon  the  completion  of  which 
duty  his  regiment  was  transferred  to  Montana.      lie  was 
promoted  colonel  of  the  Thirteenth   Infantry  March  20, 
1879,  but  transferred  to  the  Third  Infantry  the  following 
June;  then  appointed  brigadier-general  U.  S.  A.  April 
6,  1 888,  and  assigned  to  the  command  of  the  Department 
of  the  Platte,  which  command  he  now  holds.     General 
Brooke  took  active  part  and  was  present  in  the  Sioux 
campaign   of   1890-91,   at    Pine    Ridge    Agency,   South 
Dakota. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


57 


COLONEL   AND   BREVET  BRIGADIER-GENERAL 
HORACE    BROOKS   (retired). 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Brigadier-General  Horace 
Brooks  was  born  in  Massachusetts,  and  was  appointed 
to  the  Military  Academy  through  the  application  of 
General  Lafayette,  from  which  he  graduated  July  I,  1835, 
and  was  assigned  to  the  Second  LTnited  States  Artillery, 
passing  through  all  the  various  grades  of  that  arm  of  the 
service  to  that  of  colonel  of  the  Fourth  Artillery,  Au- 
gust 1,  1863. 

His  first  war  experience  was  with  the  Indians  in 
Florida,  being  engaged  in  the  combat  of  "  Withlacoochie" 
and  action  of  "  Oloklikaha,"  March  31,  1836,  for  which 
lie  was  brevetted  first  lieutenant.  He  was  then  ordered 
tn  duty  as  assistant  professor  of  mathematics  at  the  Mili- 
tary Academy,  where  he  remained  until  1S39.  He  was 
then  on  frontier,  recruiting,  and  garrison  duty  until  the 
breaking  out  of  the  Mexican  War,  when  he  was  sent  to 
Tampico  (old  Mexico)  with  the  first  troops  that  occupied 
it,  and  was  ordered  to  the  neck,  or  only  road  by  land  to 
the  city,  which  he  was  ordered  to  hold  at  all  hazards. 

During  the  Mexican  War  he  was  engaged  in  the  siege 
of  Vera  Cruz,  battles  of  Cerro  Gordo,  Amazoque,  San 
Antonio,  Contreras,  Churubusco,  Molino  del  Rey,  Cha- 
pultepec,  and  capture  of  the  City*  of  Mexico.  He  was 
brevetted  a  major  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  in 
the  battles  of  Contreras  and  Churubusco,"  and  lieutenant- 
colonel  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  in  the  battle 
of  Molino  del  Rey." 

During  the  Canada  War  received  a  letter  from  the 
judge  of  the  court  (that  tried  McCloud)  for  handling  his 
company  with  much  discretion  on  the  critical  occasion, 
and  he  escorted  McCloud  to  Montreal,  with  General 
Anderson,  and  turned  him  over  to  the  civil  authorities. 
Received  the  compliments  of  General  Mansfield,  in- 
spector-general, for  having  one  of  the  best-drilled  com- 
panies in  New  Mexico  in  1S51;  received  the  formal 
thanks  of  the  citizens  of  Santa  Fe,  New  Mexico,  for 
cutting  through  the  palace  and  placing  a  mountain 
howitzer  in  position  to  flank  the  plaza,  there  being  fears 
of  an  insurrection  of  the  Spanish  population,  which 
caused  the  Americans  to  stand  guard  night  and  day.  On 
garrison  and  frontier  duty,  including  the  Utah  expedi- 
tion, Indian  skirmishing,  and  the  border  troubles  in 
Kansas,  to  1861,  Inning  been  engaged  in  a  skirmish  with 
Utah  Indians  April  28,  1855;  also  in  a  skirmish  near 
the  head-waters  of  the  Arkansas  River,  while  stationed 
at  Fort  Massachusetts,  New  Mexico. 

At  beginning  of  Civil  War  was  in  command  of  the 
Light-Battery  School  of  Practice ;  transferred  his  com- 
mand by  way  of  Chicago  to  Baltimore,  through  a  recep- 
tion of  artillery  salutes  as  he  passed  through  the  States. 
February  22,  1861,  passed  his  companies  in  review  before 
8 


President  Buchanan,  the  event  causing  some  excitement ; 
had  a  light  battery  stationed  at  the  Treasury  Department 
prepared  for  action  on  the  inauguration  of  President 
Lincoln  ;  soon  after  was  placed  in  command  of  a  steamer, 
sailing  under  sealed  orders,  which  proved  to  be  Fort 
Pickens,  Pensacola,  and  took  part  in  the  council  of  war 
which  was  held  to  determine  whether  the  fort  should  be 
held  or  abandoned  ;  was  in  command  at  Tortugas  at  the 
time  of  the  Mason  and  Slidell  capture,  and  suppressed  a 
strike  by  the  New  York  Wilson  Zouaves,  which  might 
result  in  consequence  of  the  labor  in  mounting  heavy 
guns  ;  ordered  by  Secretary  of  War  to  the  command  of 
Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania  ;  superintendent  of  volunteer 
recruiting  at  Columbus,  Ohio,  at  the  time  of  the  Morgan 
Raid;  also  chief  mustering  and  disbursing  officer ;  was 
for  some  time  commissioner  for  the  States  of  Maryland 
and  Delaware  on  account  of  the  Freedman's  Bureau  ; 
was  detached  on  the  board  to  select  officers  from  the 
volunteer  service  to  appointments  in  the  regular  army. 
Relieved  General  Canby  in  the  command  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Washington  ;  was  in  command  of  Fort  Wash- 
ington and  the  Fourth  Regiment  of  Artillery  at  the  time 
of  the  attack  on  Washington  City  by  General  Early. 

At  the  close  of  the  Civil  War  Colonel  Brooks  was  hon- 
ored with  the  brevet  of  brigadier-general  in  the  United 
States  Army  for  meritorious  services  during  the  war. 

Title  of  A.B.  conferred  by  the  faculty  of  Geneva  (New 
York)  College  in  1 838  ;  made  an  honorary  member  of  the 
Literary  and  Historical  Society  of  Sioux  City,  Iowa  ;  and 
life-member  of  a  rifle  club  at  San  Francisco,  California. 

General  Brooks  was  retired  from  active  service  in  1  <S 7 7 . 
His  mother  was  Maria  Gowen  Brooks,  the  authoress  of 
"  Zophiel  and  other  Poems  ;"  and  Doctor  Southey,  after 
quoting  from  "  Zophiel,"  adds  that  "  Maria  del  Occi- 
dente  was  the  most  imaginative  and  impassioned  of 
all  poetesses." 


5» 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


SURGEON-GENERAL  JOHN   MILLS   BROWNE. 

Surgeon-General  John  Mills  Browne  was  born  in 
Hinsdale,  New  Hampshire,  May  10,  1831 ;  graduated  at 
the  medical  department  of  Harvard  University  in  March, 
1852,  and  appointed  assistant  surgeon  from  New  Hamp- 
shire March  26,  1853. 

His  first  duty  was  on  board  the  store-ship  "  Warren," 
Lieutenant-Commanding  Fabius  Stanley,  at  Saucelito, 
opposite  San  Francisco.  The  naval  station  at  Mare 
Island  was  just  then  in  contemplation,  and  Commander 
Farragut  had  been  sent  out,  to  get  the  plans  under  way, 
as  the  first  commandant.  He  was  obliged  to  live  on 
board  the  "  Warren"  until  some  sort  of  quarters  could  be 
provided  <>n  shore.  Dr.  Browne  was  medical  officer  of 
this  naval  establishment  until  May,  1855,  a  characteristic 
and  critical  period  in  the  settlement  of  California.  Dr. 
Browne  was  next  ordered  to  the  steamer"  Active," 
which  was  engaged  in  the  survey  of  the  coasts  and 
harbors  of  California,  Oregon,  anil  Washington  Terri- 
tories, and  in  the  winter  of  1855—56  (with  the  "  Massa- 
chusetts" and  "  Decatur")  in  the  Indian  war  in  Puget 
Sound.  In  the  summer  of  1857  the  "  Active"  was  en- 
gaged, with  H.M.S.  "Satellite,"  in  settling  the  northwest 
boundary. 

After  this  long  tour  of  duty  on  the  Western  coast,  Dr. 
Browne  came  East,  was  promoted  to  passed  assistant 
surgeon,  and  ordered  to  the  "Dolphin,"  of  the  Home 
Squadron,  in  June,  1858.  She  was  commanded  by  John 
N.  Maffit,  so  well  known  afterwards  as  the  commander 
of  the  Confederate  "  Florida."  In  August,  1858,  the 
"  Dolphin"  captured  the  brig  "  Echo"  off  Cape  Verde, 
Cuba,  with  over  three  hundred  African  slaves  on  board. 
The  prize  was  sent  to  Charleston,  South  Carolina,  and 
the  negroes  were  taken  to  Liberia  in  the  "  Niagara." 


When  the  Paraguay  Expedition  was  sent  out,  Dr.  Browne 
was  ordered  to  the  steamer  "  Atlanta,"  Captain  Daniel 
B.  Ridgely,  and  detached  before  sailing.  After  short  ser- 
vice at  the  Naval  Hospital  at  Norfolk,  he  was  attached 
t<  >  the  sloop-of-war  "  Constellation,"  flag-ship  of  the  Afri- 
can Squadron,  which  we  were  at  that  time  bound  by  con- 
vention to  keep  on  the  West  Coast.  During  the  cruise 
the  "  Constellation"  captured,  off  the  Congo  River,  the 
bark  "  Cora,"  with  seven  hundred  and  five  slaves,  who 
were  sent  to  Liberia. 

Dr.  Browne  was  commissioned  as  surgeon  June  19, 
1 86 1,  and  ordered  to  the  steam-sloop  "  Kearsarge,"  a 
ship  which  will  always  be  celebrated  in  the  annals  of 
our  navy.  She  was  sent  on  "  special  duty"  to  the  Euro- 
pean waters  in  1861,  visiting  all  the  ports  of  the  British 
and  continental  littoral  where  she  was  likely  to  find  the 
Confederate  corsairs.  At  last,  when  in  command  of 
Commander  Winslow,  she  found  the  "  Alabama"  in  Cher- 
bourg. The  preparations  for  the  engagement  which  be- 
came necessary  were  like  those  for  a  battle  "  in  the  lists," 
and  when  the  hour  sounded  the  champions  came  forth. 
The  "  Kearsarge"  destroyed  the  "  Alabama"  in  one  hour 
and  two  minutes.  Special  trains  came  from  Paris  to 
witness  the  fight.  The  "  Kearsarge"  then  went  to  Brazil, 
to  look  for  the  "  Florida,"  which  was  supposed  to  be 
about  Fernando  Noronha.  Disappointed  in  the  search, 
she  returned  to  the  LTnited  States. 

After  some  temporary  duty,  Dr.  Browne  was,  in  April, 
1865,  ordered  back  to  the  scene  of  his  original  duty  in 
California,  where  he  superintended  the  building  of  the 
Naval  Hospital  at  Mare  Island,  and  was  in  charge  there 
for  nearly  ten  years,  with  the  exception  of  a  cruise  as  fleet- 
surgeon  of  the  Pacific  Squadron.  This  latter  post  he 
again  filled,  after  he  had  been  made  medical  inspector  in 
the  regular  course  of  promotion.  He  was  commissioned 
medical  director  October  6,  1878,  and  then  came  East 
again.  During  1880-82  he  served  as  president  of  the 
Medical  Examining  Board  at  Washington,  and  was  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Visitors  to  the  Naval  Academy 
in  1 88 1.  In  the  same  year  he  went  to  London,  England, 
as  the  naval  representative  at  the  International  Medical 
Congress  ;  was  a  member  of  the  National  Board  of  Health 
in  1883,  and  in  charge  of  the  Museum  of  Hygiene  at 
Washington  from  18S2  to  18S5.  During  that  time  he 
also  served  on  the  Board  of  Naval  Regulations.  In  18S4 
Medical  Director  Browne  was  naval  representative  at  the 
International  Medical  Congress  at  Copenhagen,  and  from 
[885  t<>  1 888  served  as  a  member  of  the  Naval  Retiring 
Board.  He  became  chief  of  Bureau  of  Medicine  and 
Surgery,  with  the  title  of  Surgeon-General  of  the  Navy, 
April,  1 888. 

Surgeon-General  Browne  is  said  to  wear  the  very  high- 
est  honors  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  and  is  a  distinguished 
member  of  club  and  official  societv  in  Washington. 


WHO  SERJED  IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


59 


MEDICAL  INSPECTOR  GEORGE  R.  BRUSH,  U.S.N. 

Medical  Inspector  George  R.  Brush,  U.S.N.,  was 
born  at  Smithtown,  Suffolk  County,  Long  Island,  New- 
York,  on  the  third  day  of  November,  1836,  and  his 
early  youth  was  passed  upon  his  father's  farm  in  that 
town. 

When  at  the  proper  age  he  took  the  course  of  aca- 
demic study  at  the  well-known  Seminary  of  the  Meth- 
odist Episcopal  Conference  at  Pennington,  New  Jersey, 
then  under  the  mastership  of  the  Rev.  J.  Townley 
Crane,  D.D. 

Brush  then  entered  the  office  of  Lafayette  Ranney, 
M.D.,  of  the  city  of  New  York,  as  a  student  of  medicine. 
His  courses  of  lectures  were  taken  at  the  College  of 
Physicians  and  Surgeons  (now  the  medical  department 
of  Columbia  College),  and  in  due  course  he  was  gradu- 
ated from  that  institution  in  March,  1858. 

Soon  after  graduation  he  began  the  practice  of  his 
profession  at  the  village  of  Sayville,  of  the  town  of  Islip, 
in  Suffolk  County,  New  York,  which  place  has  continued 
to  be  his  usual  residence. 

The  breaking  out  of  the  Civil  War,  however,  altered  his 
plans,  and  drew  him,  as  well  as  so  many  thousand  others, 
into  embarking  upon  a  very  different  career  from  that 
which  they  had  contemplated. 

Accordingly,  on  the  2d  of  September,  1861, — having 
passed  the  required  examination  before  a  board  of  naval 
surgeons  at  the  Naval  Hospital  at  Brooklyn,  New  York, — 
he  was  appointed  an  assistant  surgeon  in  the  U.  S.  Navy 
by  the  Hon.  Gideon  Welles,  Secretary  of  the  Navy.  This 
appointment  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  the  24th  of 
January  following,  and  his  commission  issued. 

During  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  he  served  on  board 
the  U.  S.  frigate  "  Potomac,"  of  the  West  Gulf  Block- 
ading Squadron,  and  on  board  the  U.  S.  receiving-ship 
"  North  Carolina,"  at  New  York, — a  position  of  great 
responsibility  for  a  medical  officer,  as  that  was  the  great 
naval  recruiting-point. 

Dr.  Brush  was  promoted  to  the  grade  of  passed  assist- 
ant surgeon  in  April,  1865,  and  to  that  of  surgeon  in 
February,  1872;  commissioned  as  medical  inspector  in 
November,  1889. 


His  service  at  sea,  which  aggregates  sixteen  years,  was 
made  on  the  Atlantic,  Pacific,  and  Asiatic  stations. 

While  attached  to  the  U.  S.  S.  "  Wateree,"  he  witnessed 
the  bombardment  of  Callao,  Peru,  by  the  Spanish  squad- 
ron, on  May  2,  1866;  was  attached  to  the  "  Saranac" 
when  she  was  wrecked  in  Seymour  Narrows,  British 
Columbia,  in  June,  1S75. 

His  latest  service  afloat  was  on  board  the  U.  S.  S. 
"  Omaha,"  bearing  the  flag  of  Rear-Admiral  George  E. 
Belknap,  on  the  Asiatic  station. 

His  shore  duty,  of  more  than  twelve  years,  has  been 
mostly  at  the  rendezvous  in  New  York,  and  on  board  the 
receiving-ship  at  the  same  place. 

It  has  included  service  at  the  U.  S.  naval  hospitals  at 
Norfolk,  Virginia,  and  at  Mare  Island,  California.  He 
has  also  been  stationed  at  the  U.  S.  Naval  Academy  at 
Annapolis,  and  at  the  U.  S.  Naval  Laboratory,  Brooklyn, 
New  York-. 

Dr.  Brush  is  a  son  of  Philetus  Smith  and  Dorothy  Ann 
Brush,  and  the  eighth  in  descent  from  Thomas  Brush, 
who  settled  at  Southold,  Long  Island,  about  1650.  His 
paternal  and  maternal  ancestors  served  as  commissioned 
officers  in  the  First  Regiment  of  Suffolk  County,  State  of 
New  York,  during  the  war  of  the  American  Revolution. 


6o 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NA  VY  (regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  ANDREW   BRYSON.  U.S.N. 

Rear-Admiral  Andrew  Bryson  was  born  in  New 
York  City,  July  25,  1822.  Was  appointed  a  midshipman 
from   New    York   December   1,   1837,  by   President  Van 

Buren,  his  father's  personal  friend,  and  made  his  first 
cruises  in  the  "<  hitario,"  "  Levant,"  and  "Constellation," 
West  India  Squadron,  until  1842,  when  he  was  ordered 
to  the  Naval  School  at  Philadelphia,  and  on  lune  29, 
1843,  promoted  to  passed  midshipman,  serving  on  the 
frigate  "  Macedonian"  and  sloop  "  Decatur"  on  the  coast 
of  Africa.  In  1845  he  served  on  the  "Michigan"  on 
the  great  lakes,  and  in  1849  "n  tne  "John  Adams." 
January  30,  1850,  he  was  promoted  to  "master,"  and 
was  executive  officer  on  the  store-ships  "Erie"  and 
"Relief."  Promoted  to  lieutenant  August  30,  1S51; 
he  was  transferred  to  the  brig  "  Bainbridge"  at  Monte- 
video, South  America,  September  2,  to  cruise  off  the 
coasts  ,,f  Brazil  and  Africa.  He  was  next  attached  to 
the  receiving-ship  "  (  >hio"  at  Boston,  and  in  1856  was  on 
the  "Saratoga."  On  this  cruise  the  steamers  "Gen.  Mira- 
mon"  and  "  Marquis  de  la  Habana"  were  captured  off 
the  Mexican  coast,  in  which  affair  Lieutenant  Bryson, 
commanding  the  "  Indianola,"  captured  the  former  after 
a  running  fight.  They  also  brought  from  San  Juan 
Walker's  filibustering  party.  In  1858  he  was  executive 
officer  of  the  "Preble,"  Paraguay  Expedition,  returning 
late  in  1860.  In  January,  r86l,  he  was  attached  to  the 
New  York  Yard,  actively  engaged  fitting  out  vessels 
until  October  10;  he  was  then  ordered  to  command  the 
"Chippewa"  one  of  the  "ninety-day"  gun-boats,  and  sent 
to  the  blockade,  taking  part  in  the  capture  of  Fort 
Macon  and  action  at  Stony  Inlet.  July  16,  1862,  he- 
was  commissioned  commander,  and,  September  2c;,  sent 
to  Europe  on  special  service,  returning  to  blockade  early 


in  1863.  The  "  Chippewa,"  under  his  command,  was  the 
first  gun-boat  of  the  class  to  cross  the  Atlantic.  June  23, 
1863,  he  was  detached,  and  August  4  ordered  to  com- 
mand the  monitor  "  Lehigh."  On  the  way  to  Charles! on, 
South  Carolina,  the  ship  was  nearly  lost  off  Ilatteras, 
seas  breaking  over  turret  and  pilot-house,  washing  away 
the  ship's  bell,  which  hung  six  and  a  half  feet  above  the 
deck.  On  April  4,  1864,  a  medical  survey  was  held 
without  his  request,  and  he  was  ordered  home  shattered 
in  health.  The  work  was  severe.  September  18,  1863, 
he  reported,  "  up  to  this  elate  the  15-inch  gun  has  been 
fired  forty-one  times,  the  8-inch  rifle  twenty-eight,  and 
the  ship  has  been  struck  thirty-six  times."  Again,  No- 
vember 4,  "engaged  for  the  past  nine  days,  in  company 
with  the  '  Patapsco'  ami  shore-batteries,  in  bombard- 
ment of  Port  Sumter,  during  which  time  I  have  thrown 
from  the  8-inch  rifle  four  hundred  and  eight  percussion- 
shells,  and  from  the  15-inch  smooth-bore  twenty-four." 
The  actions  were  almost  continuous;  and  his  conduct 
on  December  2,  1863,  when  he  was  slightly  wounded, 
the  ship,  being  aground  and  subjected  to  the  concentrated 
fire  from  nine  separate  batteries,  was  specially  com- 
mended. May  24,  1864,  he  was  again  on  duty  at  the 
New  York  Yard.  October  13  ordered  to  command  the 
"  Essex,"  Mississippi  fleet.  October  24  to  command  the 
seventh,  and  on  April  19,  1865,  the  eighth  division.  May 
5  fleet-captain,  and  August  19  detached.  April  6,  1866, 
to  March,  1868,  he  commanded  the  "Michigan."  On 
June  3,  1866,  he  captured  the  "Fenian"  raiders  on  their 
return  from  Canada,  and  on  July  25,  1866,  was  promoted 
to  captain.  1868-71  he  was  at  the  Boston  Yard,  in 
command  of  the  receiving-ship  "  ( )hio,"  and  on  Board 
duty.  September  19,  1 87 1,  to  July  28,  1873,  he  com- 
manded the  "  Brooklyn,"  European  squadron,  and  was 
commissioned  commodore  February  14,  1873.  Sep- 
tember 15,  1874,  to  Jul_\-  27,  1876,  he  commanded  the 
Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  Navy- Yard;  was  President 
of  the  Board  to  examine  the  class  of  1876  at  Annapolis, 
and  engaged  on  Hoard  and  other  duty  to  1879.  Sep- 
tember 8,  1879,  to  Inly  25,  1881,  he  commanded  the 
South  Atlantic  station,  flag-ship  "  Shenandoah,"  and  was 
promoted  March  25,  1880,  to  rear-admiral.  On  January 
30,  1883,  he  was  retired  at  his  own  request,  and  spent  the 
remainder  of  his  days  quietly  at  his  home  in  the  city  of 
Washington. 

"In  all  his  long  record  there  is  not  a  blemish  against 
his  high  character  and  honor,  and  he  was  greatly  beloved 
by  his  fellow-officers.  He  was  a  man  of  a  retiring  dis- 
position, excessively  modest,  but  one  of  the  best  informed 
men  of  the  navy."  lie  was  of  Scotch  ancestry,  and  his 
father,  the  late  David  Bryson,  was  prominent  in  New- 
York  City  affairs.  Died  in  Washington,  D.C.,  February 
7,  1892- 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


6 1 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  HORACE   BLOIS  BURNHAM 
(retired). 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Horace  Blois  Burnham  was 
born  in  Columbia  County,  New  York,  September  10, 
1S24.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  at  Wilkesbarre, 
Pennsylvania,  August  12,  1844,  and  practised  law  in  the 
courts  of  that  State  until  1 861.  He  commenced  the  or- 
ganization of  a  three-years'  regiment  of  volunteers  July 
26,  1 S6 1,  and  entered  the  volunteer  service  as  lieutenant- 
colonel  ofthe  Sixty-seventh  Pennsylvania  Infantry, October 
31,1  861.  He  took  station  at  Annapolis,  Man-land,  April 
3,  1862,  and  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Harper's  Ferry, 
Virginia,  in  February,  1863,  and  in  April  of  the  same 
year  was  stationed  at  Berryville,  Virginia,  from  whence 
he  joined  the  forces  at  Maryland  Heights  June  16,  and 
escorted  stores,  ordnance,  etc.,  from  Harper's  Ferry  to 
Washington  City. 

Colonel  Burnham  joined  the  Army  of  the  Potomac 
with  his  regiment  in  the  following  July,  and  participated 
in  all  its  actions  and  campaigns  during  that  year.  He 
took  part  against  the  attack  by  General  Early  June  10; 
joined  Milroy's  forces  and  engaged  in  the  affair  at  Ope- 
quan  River,  Virginia,  and  participated  in  the  battle  of 
Winchester,  Virginia,  during  the  12th,  13th,  and  14th  of 
June,  1S63.  He  was  on  temporary  duty  in  New  York- 
City  during  the  draft  riots,  and  was  ordered  to  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  December  26,  [863,  as  judge-advocate  of 
a  general  court-martial. 

Colonel  Burnham  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the 
line,  October  31,  1864,  to  accept  the  position  of  a  major 
and  judge-advocate  from  that  date,  when  he  was  de- 
tailed as  judge-advocate  of  general  courts-martial  under 
orders  of  the  War  Department  until  1866,  when  he 
was  placed  on  duty  in  the  Bureau  of  Military  Justice 
until  April  18,  1867,  when  he  was  assigned  as  chief 
judge-advocate  ofthe  First  Military  District,  Richmond, 
Virginia,  and  continued  so  engaged  until  June,  1870; 
he  was  additionally  assigned  as  judge  of  the  Hustings 
Court,  Richmond,  Virginia,  September  11,  1867,  and 
was  relieved  and  appointed  one  of  the  judges  of  the 
Supreme  Court  of  Appeals  of  Virginia  June  9,  1869, 
and  elected  president  thereof;  performed  such  duty 
until  relieved  June  1,  1870;  June  3,  1870,  he  was  as- 
signed to  the  Department  of  the  South  ;  April  24,  1872, 
additionally  assigned  to  temporary  duty  in  the  Depart- 
ment of  Texas  ;  from  this  he  was  relieved  November  2, 
1 872,  and  assigned  to  duty  in  the  Department  ofthe  Platte, 


and  judge-advocate,  head-quarters,  Department  of  the 
Platte,  Omaha,  Nebraska;  he  was  relieved  from  duty 
September  10,  1S86,  and  assigned  to  duty  in  the  Depart- 
ment of  California  and  Military  Division  of  the  Pacific, 
San  Francisco,  California,  until  retirement. 

Colonel  Burnham  was  transferred  to  the  permanent 
establishment  of  the  U.  S.  Army  February  25,  1867,  and 
received  the  brevets  of  lieutenant-colonel  and  colonel  of 
volunteers  March  13,  1865,  "for  faithful  and  meritorious 
services  during  the  war."  Upon  being  relieved  from  duty 
in  the  Department  ofthe  Platte,  September  1,  1886,  Gen- 
eral Crook,  department  commander,  in  General  Orders 
No.  11,  Head-quarters  Department  ofthe  Platte,  I.  1S86, 
said  :  "  The  department  commander  takes  this  occasion 
to  express  his  appreciation  of  Colonel  Burnham's  con- 
scientious fidelity  to  his  duties  during  his  long  term  of 
service  in  this  department"  (nearly  fourteen  years).  In 
anticipation  of  his  retirement,  General  Howard,  the  divi- 
sion commander,  directed  the  following  communication  : 
"The  division  commander  desires  to  express  to  you  his 
esteem  and  his  thanks  for  the  faithful  and  zealous  manner 
in  which  you  have  performed  the  duties  of  judge-advocate 
of  this  division  and  of  the  department  of  California.  You 
will  carry  with  you  the  best  wishes  of  the  staff  officers 
for  your  welfare  and  happiness." 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  and  deputy  judge- 
advocate-general  Jul)-  5,  1884,  and  was  retired  from  active 
service  by  operation  of  law,  September  10,  1888;  and 
since  retirement  has  occupied  his  farm,  "  Aspen  Shade," 
near  Richmond,  in  Henrico  County,  Virginia. 


62 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD  NAVY  ^regular) 


AMBROSE  E.  BURNSIDB  (deceased). 

Ambrose  E.  Burnside  (deceased)  was  bom  in  Indiana, 
and  graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  July  I,  1847. 
I  Ie  was  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant  Second  Artil- 
lery the  same  day,  and  second  lieutenant  of  the  Third 
Artillery  September  8,  1847.  He  served  in  the  City  of 
Mexico  during  the  winter  of  1 847-48,  and  when  peace 
had  been  established  with  that  republic  he  was  stationed 
at  boit  Adams,  Rhode  Island,  from  which  point  he  was 
ordered  to  Las  Vegas,  New  Mexico,  and  was  engaged 
in  a  skirmish  there  with  Jacarillo  .Apache  Indians, 
August  23,  1849,  in  which  he  was  wounded.  During 
the  years  1850-5  I  he  was  at  Jefferson  Barracks,  Missouri ; 
he  was  with  the  .Mexican  Boundary  Commission  from 
April,  1851,  to  March  16,  1852. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  December  12,  1851, 
and  was  at  Fort  Adams  in  1852-53,  and  resigned 
(  Ictober  2,  1S53. 

After  leaving  the  army  he  became  a  manufacturer  of 
fire-arms  at  Bristol,  Rhode  Island,  from  [853  to  [858. 
I  le  was  major-general  of  Rhode  Island  militia  in  1855-57. 
He  invented  the  Burnside  breech-loading  rifle  in  1856, 
and  was  member  of  the  Board  of  Visitors  to  the  Military 
Academy  the  same  year.  He  was  cashier  of  the  Land 
Department  of  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad  Company  in 
1858-59,  and  treasurer  of  the  same  railroad  in  1860-61. 

At  the  commencement  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion 
he  was  appointed  colonel  of  Rhode  Island  \rolunteers 
Ma}-  2,  1 86 1,  and  served  in  defence  of  Washington  in 
Patterson's  operations  about  Cumberland,  Maryland,  and 
participated  in  the  Manassas  campaign,  being  engaged  in 
the  first  battle  of  Hull  Run,  July  21,  1861.  He  was 
mustered  out  of  service  August  2,  1861. 

On  the  6th  of  August,  1861,  he  was  appointed  brig- 
adier-general of  volunteers,  and  served  in  command  of 


Provisional  Brigade  near  Washington,  and  was  then 
employed  in  organizing  a  Coast  Division  at  Annapolis, 
Maryland,  to  January  8,  1862. 

General  Burnside  was  then  placed  in  command  of  the 
Department  of  North  Carolina,  and  was  engaged  in  the 
battle  and  capture  of  Roanoke  Island  ;  attack  of  New- 
Berne,  North  Carolina  ;  attack  on  Camden  and  bombard- 
ment of  Fort  Macon,  resulting  in  its  capture  April  26, 
1862.  For  these  affairs  he  received  a  sword  of  honor 
from  the  State  of  Rhode  Island,  in  testimony  of  his  ser- 
vices at  Roanoke  Island. 

He  was  appointed  major-general  of  volunteers  March 
18,  1862,  and  from  July  6  to  September  4,  1862,  he  was 
in  command  of  the  reinforcements  to  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  concentrated  at  Newport  News,  Virginia,  and 
subsequently  at  Fredericksburg,  constituting  the  Ninth 
Army  Corps.  General  Burnside  participated  in  the  Mary- 
land campaign,  in  command  of  the  right  wing  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  of  the  Ninth  Corps,  and  was 
engaged  in  the  battles  of  South  Mountain  and  Antietam. 
Afterwards  he  had  general  charge  of  Harper's  Ferry, 
Virginia,  ami  Second  and  Twelfth  Corps,  until  November 
10,  1862,  and  on  this  date,  while  marching  towards  Fal- 
mouth, he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  the  Army 
of  the  Potomac,  relieving  General  McClellan.  He 
commanded  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  in  the  battle 
of  Fredericksburg,  December  11— 13,  1S62,  and  in 
March,  1863,  was  relieved  and  ordered  to  the  West, 
where  he  commanded  the  Department  of  the  Ohio. 
He  participated  in  the  capture  of  Cumberland  Gap 
and  occupation  of  East  Tennessee,  and  was  engaged 
in  the  actions  of  Blue  Springs  and  Lenoir,  combat  of 
Campbell's  Station,  and  siege  of  Knoxville.  He  was 
engaged  in  recruiting  the  Ninth  Army  Corps  from 
January  12  to  April  13,  1864,  and  then  commanded 
that  corps  in  the  Richmond  campaign  with  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in  the  battles  of  the  Wilder- 
ness, Spottsylvania,  North  Anna,  Tolopotomy,  Bethesda 
Church,  and  siege  of  Petersburg,  including  the  Mine 
assault  Jul\-  30,  1864.  He  was  then  on  leave  of  absence 
and  waiting  orders  to  April  15,  1865,  when  he  resigned 
his  commission. 

In  1864  General  Burnside  received  the  thanks  of  Con- 
gress for  "  gallantry,  good  conduct,  and  soldier-like 
endurance"  in  North  Carolina  and  Fast  Tennessee. 

After  leaving  the  service,  General  Burnside  was  direct'  >r 
of  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad  Company  and  in  the 
Narragansett  Steamship  Company  ;  president  of  the 
Cincinnati  and  Martinsville  Railroad  Company  ;  of  Rhode 
Island  Locomotive  Works  at  Providence ;  and  of  the 
Indianapolis  and  Vincennes  Railroad  Company.  lie  was 
also  governor  and  captain-general  of  Rhode  Island  and 
Providence  Plantations.  He  was  also  U.S.  senator  from 
that  State,  and  died  September  13,  1881. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


63 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  ANDREW  SHERIDAN  BURT, 

U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Andrew  Sheridan  Burt  (Sev- 
enth Infantry)  was  born  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  Nov.  21,  1839. 

In  April,  1K61,  he  volunteered  in  the  Sixth  Ohio  In- 
fantry, and  Jul}-,  the  same  year,  he  accepted  a  first  lieu- 
tenancy in  the  Eighteenth  United  States  Infantry.  The 
command  was  attached  that  fall  to  the  Third  Brigade, 
First  Division,  of  the  Army  of  Ohio,  Colonel  Robert  L. 
McCook  and  Brigadier-General  George  LI.  Thomas 
commanding  respectively. 

Lieutenant  Burt  was  detailed  as  aide-de-camp  on  the 
brigade  staff.  At  the  battle  of  Mill  Springs  he  was 
wounded,  and  was  brevetted  for  gallant  services;  he  was 
appointed  additional  aide-de-camp  on  the  staff  of  Gen- 
eral Halleck  and  assigned  to  serve  with  Colonel  McCook. 
The  same  year  he  was  made  assistant  adjutant-general 
of  the  brigade,  and  continued  as  such  until  Colonel 
Mi  Cook's  death. 

In  January,  [863,  he  reported  to  General  Rosecrans, 
commanding  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland,  and  by  him 
was  assigned  to  the  inspector-general's  department  of  his 
staff,  serving  so  through  Hoover's  Gap  and  Tullahoma 
campaigns,  advance  beyond  Chattanooga,  and  in  the  bat- 
tle of  Chickamauga.  He  was  commended  in  reports  by 
the  commanding  general  for  services  in  these  campaigns 
and  battle  of  Chickamauga.  Captain  Burt  was  specially 
mentioned  for  gallant  service  in  that  battle  by  Major- 
General  Alexander  McCook,  commanding  the  corps. 
In  the  fall  of  1883,  at  his  own  request,  he  relinquished 
his  staff  appointment  and  took  command  of  his  Company 
F,  First  Battalion,  Eighteenth  Infantry.  He  commanded 
that  company  in  the  charge  on  Missionary  Ridge.  Gen- 
eral Palmer,  on  the  Ridge,  thanked  the  company. 

Captain  Burt  commanded  his  Company  F,  Eighteenth 
Infantry,  part  of  the  Regular  Brigade  of  the  Fourteenth 
Army  Corps,  in  the  Atlanta  campaign,  and  was  in  all 
the  actions  participated  in  by  his  regiment  from  Buzzard's 
Roost  to  Jonesboro',  and  received  the  personal  thanks  of 
the  detachment  commander  for  gallant  services  in  the  last 
battle.  He  was  mentioned  in  reports  for  services  in  the 
Atlanta  campaign  by  the  detachment  commander  as  well 
as  by  General  Thomas.  He  was  brevetted  major  1864, 
for  gallant  services  in  Atlanta  campaign  and  at  the  battle 
of  Jonesboro'.  Major  Burt  marched,  in  [866,  with  his 
company,  from  Fort  Leavenworth  to  Fort  Bridger. 

In  the  fall  of  1877,  while  in  command  of  a  detachment 
of  recruits  en  route  to  Fort  McKinney,  he  was  attacked 
by  Indians  under  Red  Cloud,  at  Crazy  Woman's  Fork, 
and  the  Indians  were  beaten  off. 

While  in  command  of  Fort  C.  F.  Smith,  Montana,  in 
1868,  he  had  two  successful  skirmishes  with  hostile 
Indians.  From  1865  until  1878  Major  Burt,  in  command 
of  his  company,  was   nearly  every  year  changing  sta- 


tions or  on  expeditions  with  .ill  the  difficulties  of  march- 
ing on  the  frontier  in  the  hostile  Indian  days. 

He  was  on  Stanley's  Yellowstone  I^xpeclition  in  1873; 
with  Colonel  Dodge's  command  as  escort  to  the  Jenney 
expedition  to  the  Black  Hills  in  1875;  General  Crook's 
expedition,  1876,  and  commanded  a  battalion  of  two  com- 
panies in  the  attack'  by  Indians  on  the  command  camped 
on  Powder  Ri\  er. 

At  the  battle  of  the  Rosebud,  General  Crook  having 
ordered  the  withdrawal  of  Colonel  Royal's  battalion  of 
cavalry  from  a  certain  position  on  the  field,  the  retreat 
became  a  rout  under  the  Indians' hand-to-hand  assault. 
Major  Burt,  with  his  company,  and  that  of  Major  Bur- 
rows, was  detailed  "  to  stop  those  Indians,"  which  the  two 
companies  did,  and  the  hard-pressed  cavalry  battalion  was 
rescued  from  a  precarious  position.  At  "  Slim  Buttes," 
same  campaign,  Major  Burt  commanded  a  battalion  in 
the  repulse  of  an  Indian  attack'.  In  1S77  Major  Burt, 
with  his  company,  was  part  of  General  John  King's  com- 
mand, sent  to  Chicago  during  the  riots.  In  1X79  his 
company  was  especially  selected  to  proceed  to  Hastings, 
Nebraska,  to  protect  Judge  Gaslin  in  holding  court  against 
the  possible  interference  <  if  In  istile  cowboys,  some  of  their 
members  being  tried  at  the  time  for  an  atrocious  murder. 
The  major  and  his  company  received  public  thanks  and 
commendation  of  Judge  Gaslin  and  the  officials  for  the 
manner  in  which  the  duty  on  this  occasion  was  performed. 

While  in  command  at  Fort  Bidwell,  California,  in  1885, 
the  citizens  of  that  region,  in  a  series  of  published  reso- 
lutions, thanked  Major  Burt  for  his  successful  efforts  in 
preventing  an  Indian  outbreak'. 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Seventh 
Infantry,  January  1,  1888. 

Colonel  Burt  is  the  author  of  \V.  F.  Cody's  (Buffalo 
Bill)  most  successful  play,  "  May  Cody,  or  Lost  and 
Won." 


f>4 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARM)    AND   NAVY  {regular) 


PAY    INSPECTOR    ARTHUR   BURTIS.  U.S.N. 

Pay  Inspector  Arthur  Burtis,  U.S.N.,  was  born  in 
New  York,  and  appointed  assistant  paymaster  from  that 
State  by  Mr.  Lincoln  in  1862,  in  accordance  with  the 
request  of  the  Honorable  Hamilton  Fish  and  Senator 
Preston  King.  These  gentlemen  had  been  classmates  of 
Assistant  Paymaster  Burtis's  father, — a  clergyman  who 
was  for  man_\-  years  a  resilient  of  Buffalo.  His  great- 
grandfather and  great-great-grandfather  both  served  in 
the  Revolutionary  War;  the  older  being  at  the  time 
sixty-four,  and  his  sun  twenty-two  years  of  age. 

His  first  orders  were  to  duty  under  Admiral  Farragut 
in  the  "Sagamore,"  but  on  the  way  there  in' the  supply 
steamer  "  Rhode  Island"  contracted  yellow  fever,  and 
he  was  sent  north.  lie  was  then,  upon  recovering  his 
health,  ordered  to  the  "  Connecticut,"  employed  in  con- 
voying the  California  steamers  through  the  Carribean 
Sea,  rendered  necessary  by  the  fact  that  the  "  Alabama" 
had  recently  overhauled  the  "  Ariel,"  with  mails  and  pas- 
sengers. The  "  Connecticut,"  of  the  North  Atlantic 
Blockading  Squadron,  was  next  on  the  blockade,  captur- 
ing four  noted  blockade-runners,  all  with  valuable  car- 
goes. She  also  caused  the  destruction  of  four  more,  in 
the  course  of  which  duty  she  was  engaged  with  Fort 
Fisher. 

From  1864  to  [866  Paymaster  Burtis  was  attached 
to  the  "  Muscoota,"  of  the  Gulf  Squadron,  and  had  the 
yellow  fever  a  second  time  on  board  that  vessel,  off  the 


Rio  Grande,  in  1866.     The  only  medical  officer  died,  and 

the  vessel  went  to  Pensacola,  where  she  received  a  sur- 
geon and  other  officers  necessary  to  take  the  ship  north. 
She  proceeded  to  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  where 
the  ship's  company  were  landed  and  placed  in  quarantine. 

While  undergoing  this  unpleasant  experience  in  the 
"  Muscoota,"  he  was  promoted  to  paymaster  May  4,  1  8( i(  >. 

From  1867  to  1S69  he  was  stationed  at  League  Island. 
From  1870  to  1873  was  attached  to  the  "Brooklyn," 
which  ship  brought  the  body  of  Admiral  Farragut  from 
Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  to  New  York,  and  then 
went  for  a  cruise  in  European  waters.  In  1S71  he  was 
appointed  fleet-paymaster. 

Upon  his  return  home,  after  service  at  the  Bureau  of 
Provisions  and  Clothing,  Navy  Department,  1873,  he- 
became  inspector  of  provisions  and  clothing  at  the  navy- 
yard,  Philadelphia,  from  1  S74  to  1  S77.  Most  of  the  time 
he  had  the  additional  duty  of  paymaster  of  the  receiving- 
ship  "  St.  Louis."  In  1 878  he  was  a  member  of  the  Board 
(il  Examiners,  lie  was  again  ordered  to  League  Island, 
but  after  about  a  year's  service  there  went  to  the  prac- 
tice-ship "  Constellation"  for  her  summer  cruise  with  the 
cadets  of  the  Naval  Academy.  After  this  he  was  for 
some  time  inspector  of  flour,  etc.,  for  the  navy,  at  New 
York.  From  1S83  to  1886  he  was  attached  to  the 
"  Galena,"  of  the  North  Atlantic  Squadron.  The  "  Ga- 
lena" was  at  Aspinwall  in  the  spring  of  1885.  During 
the  rebellion  on  the  Isthmus,  and  when  that  city  was 
burned,  the  officers  and  crew  of  the  ship  prevented  much 
destruction  of  property  and  loss  of  life.  The  "Galena'' 
also  captured  at  St.  Andrew's  Island  filibustering  steamer 
"  City  of  Mexico"  in  February,  1886.  From  June,  [866, 
to  May,  1889,  was  the  paymaster  of  the  navy-yard,  New 
York.  He  next  went  to  the  "  Vermont,"  receiving-ship 
at  New  York,  and  in  January,  1890,  was  ordered  as  fleet- 
paymaster  of  the  Pacific  Squadron  in  the  flag-ship 
"  Charleston."  The  "  Charleston"  brought  King  Kala- 
kau  from  the  Sandwich  Islands  to  California  and  took 
his  remains  back  to  Honolulu  in  January,  1891.  From 
the"  Charleston"  he  was  transferred  to  the  flag-ship  "  San 
Francisco,"  31st  March,  1891.  The  "San  Francisco" 
was  in  Chili  during  the  revolution  in  1891,  and  was  in 
Valparaiso  when  Balmaceda's  army  was  defeated  and  the 
Congressional  forces  captured  that  city  August  2X,  1891. 
Was  promoted  to  pay  inspector  21st  September,  [89]  ; 
was  detached  from  the  flag-ship  "  San  Francisco"  30th 
January,  [892.  lie  is  at  present  general  storekeeper  at 
the  navy-yard,  Norfolk,  Virginia. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


65 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  EDMOND  BUTLER,  U.S.A. 
(retired). 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Edmond  Butler  (retired)  was 
born  in  Ireland  March  19,  1827.  He  was  appointed 
second  lieutenant  Fifth  Infantry  at  the  outbreak  of  the 
war,  and  detailed  to  accompany  General  Baird  (after- 
wards inspector-general)  in  inspection  of  Kansas  and 
Missouri  troops.  In  1862,  remustering  and  consoli- 
dating Kansas  volunteers,  and  officially  complimented 
by  General  Hunter  for  settling,  without  resort  to  force, 
"  difficult  and  delicate"  matters  affecting  Kansas  troops. 
He  was  in  New  Mexico  in  1862,  and  Texas  1864,  and 
rebuilt  Fort  Bliss  after  reoccupation.  Having  been 
promoted  captain,  1864,  in  1S65  he  commanded  an  ex- 
pedition against  the  Navajos,  inflicting  severe  loss  on 
them.  In  September,  1865,  he  received  the  formal  sur- 
render of  Manoelito  Grande,  and  sent  two  thousand 
prisoners  to  the  Reservation.  He  was  recommended  for 
brevet  for  gallantry  and  success.  In  letters  from  his  I 
head-quarters,  November  16  and  17,  1865,  General  Carle-  ] 
ton  wrote,  "  To  Captain  Edmond  Butler  I  owe  many 
thanks."  "To  the  efficiency  and  straightforward  course 
and  the  energy  and  good  sense  of  Captain  B.  I  owe  a 
great  deal  of  the  luck  I  get  credit  for  as  a  commander." 

In  June,  1868,  Captain  Butler  was  ordered  in  attend- 
ance on  General  Sherman,  and  in  December,  with  a  small 
infantry  force,  he  exhumed  the  bodies  of  the  killed  in  the 
Forsyth  affair,  on  the  Arickaree  Fork,  under  fire  of 
main  body  of  Sioux  under  Two  Strike,  and  extricated 
his  small  force  from  a  perilous  position.  In  1869,  in  the 
Indian  operations  on  the  Smoky  Hill,  with  two  soldiers 
he  narrowly  escaped  capture.  He  volunteered  for  expe- 
dition against  the  Pawnees  under  General  Woods,  and 
commanded  expedition  after  General  Woods  was  dis- 
abled by  illness.  In  1874  he  served  through  the  ex- 
pedition against  the  Kiowas  and  Comanches,  under 
General  Miles. 

In  September,  1876,  Captain  Butler  cut  a  road  through 
the  Bad  Lands  north  of  the  Yellowstone.  In  the  cam- 
paign against  Sitting  Bull  he  commanded  the  centre  at 
Cedar  Creek,  and  in  subsequent  pursuit.  He  was  shot  at 
by  Gall  while  relieving  an  outpost.  He  participated  in 
campaign  against  the  confederated  Sioux  and  Cheyennes 
under  Crazy  Horse,  and  on  January  8,  1877,  led  a 
charge  against  the  Indians  fortified  on  a  high  peak  of 
the  Wolf  Mountains,  and  massing  in  rear  of  Miles's  posi- 
tion. In  his  report  General  Miles  said,  "Captain  But- 
ler's horse  was  shot  under  him  while  gallantly  leading  a 
successful  charge  on  the  extreme  left."  He  recom- 
mended Captain  Butler  for  brevet,  "  for  conspicuous 
gallantry  in  leading  his  command  in  a  successful  charge 
against  superior  numbers  of  hostile  Indians  strongly 
posted."  This  recommendation  was  approved  by  Gen- 
9 


erals  Sherman,  Sheridan,  and  Terry.  At  the  close  of 
the  campaign  General  Miles  wrote  Captain  Butler  as 
follows :  "  In  leaving  the  regiment,  be  assured  you  have 
the  thanks  and  good-will  of  its  commanding  officer  for 
your  hard  service  in  the  field  and  fortitude  in  action." 

Nothing  in  his  service,  however,  touched  him  so 
deeply  as  a  letter  signed  by  every  enlisted  man  of  his 
company  who  was  in  the  charge,  thanking  him  "  for  the 
gallant  manner  in  which  he  led  the  charge  on  the  8th  of 
January,  in  which  they  had  the  honor  of  participating, 
and  for  the  kindness  he  had  shown  them  in  so  many 
different  ways  heretofore." 

Captain  Butler  was  promoted  major  in  1885.  He  com- 
manded Fort  Townsend,  Washington.  Commanded 
Bellevue  Rifle  Range  three  consecutive  years;  marks- 
man, 1883,  1884,  1885.  Sharpshooter  marksman,  1888. 
He  was  recorder  of  Board  of  Visitors  to  School  of 
Application  in  1887,  and  was  in  Pine  Ridge  campaign, 
1890-91,  commanding  troops  in  night  march  from  Rush- 
ville,  Nebraska,  to  the  Agency,  and  his  regiment  during 
the  campaign.  At  its  close  he  received  a  copy  of  a  letter 
to  General  Brooke,  in  which  the  Secretary  of  War  and 
the  General  of  the  Army  express  a  hope  "  that  some 
opportunity  may  be  presented  for  the  promotion  of  this 
most  deserving  officer."  He  was  promoted  lieutenant- 
colonel  in  March,  1892. 

Upon  retirement  from  active  service  in  March,  1891, 
after  examination  by  the  Bar  Committee  for  the  Seventh 
Judicial  District  of  Montana,  he  was  admitted  to  the  Bar 
of  that  State. 

Colonel  Butler  is  the  author  of  an  "  Essay  on  the 
Indian  Question,"  honorably  mentioned  by  the  Board 
of  Award  of  the  Military  Service  Institution  for  1880. 
After  the  fall  of  Sumter  he  wrote  a  series  of  articles  in 
French  for  Parisian  and  Brussels  papers,  presenting  the 
Union  side  of  the  question  to  Continental  Europe. 


66 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR  JOHN  G.  BUTLER. 

Major  John  G.  Butler  (Ordnance  Department)  was 
born  in  Pittsburg,  Pennsylvania,  January  23,  1842,  and 
graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  June  11,  1863. 
He  was  then  promoted  second  lieutenant  of  the  Fourth 
Artillery,  but  transferred  to  the  Ordnance  Department 
January  29,  1864.  He  served  during  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  in  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland,  from  August, 
1863,  to  January,  I  864,  participating  in  the  campaign  of 
that  army,  and  engaged  at  the  battle  of  Chickamauga, 
for  which  he  received  the  following  complimentary 
notice,  in  the  report  of  first  lieutenant  F.  L.  D.  Russell, 
Fourth  Artillery:  "Lieutenant  Butler,  the  only  officer 
with  me,  distinguished  himself  by  his  cool  and  gallant 
conduct  and  rendered  me  the  most  essential  service." 
He  was  brevetted  first  lieutenant  for  "  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  in  the  battle  of  Chickamauga,"  Sep- 
tember 20,  1863. 

Lieutenant  Butler  was  then  stationed  at  Chattanooga, 
Tennessee,  and  Bridgeport,  Alabama,  until  he  was  or- 
dered on  recruiting  duty  in  January  1864,  which  duty 
he,  by  permission,  declined.  lie  was  then  ordered  to 
appear  at  Washington,  for  examination  for  transfer  to 
the  Ordnance  Department,  and  upon  being  transferred 
was  stationed  at  Frankford  Arsenal,  Pennsylvania,  as 
assistant  ordnance  officer,  from  February  1  to  December 
1  1,  1864,  being  detached  May  19  to  July  I,  to  arm  and 
equip    New    Jersey    troops.       He    sailed,    under    sealed 


orders,  November,  1S64,  in  charge  of  ordnance  stores 
and  material,  to  anticipate  the  arrival  of  General  Sher- 
man's army  on  the  Atlantic  coast. 

After  performing  this  duty,  Lieutenant  Butler  was 
detailed  as  assistant  to  the  inspector  of  ordnance  in 
New  York,  Boston,  Philadelphia,  West  Point,  and  Read- 
ing, to  January,  1867,  and  assistant  constructor  of  ord- 
nance at  Scott  Foundry,  Reading,  Pennsylvania,  to  June, 
[867.  In  the  mean  time  he  was  promoted  first  lieuten- 
ant, to  date  from  March  7,  1867.  Upon  being  relieved  at 
Reading,  he  was  ordered  as  assistant  at  Fort  Leavenworth 
Arsenal,  Kansas,  where  he  remained  until  May,  1870. 
lie  was  then  placed  on  detached  duty  in  Philadelphia 
until  the  following  September,  when  he  was  ordered  to 
Fort  Monroe  Arsenal,  Virginia,  as  assistant.  From 
May  to  September,  1873,  the  lieutenant  was  on  detached 
duty  at  the  U.  S.  Ordnance  Agency,  New  York,  then 
assistant  to  the  constructor  of  ordnance  to  April  22, 
1876,  in  the  mean  time  having  been  promoted  captain 
June  23,  1874. 

In  May,  1876,  captain  Butler  was  ordered  as  assistant 
at  Watervliet  Arsenal,  New  York,  and  in  May,  1880, 
transferred  to  Watertown  Arsenal,  Massachusetts,  as 
assistant.  On  the  5th  of  April,  1883,  his  station  was 
changed  to  Rock  Island  Arsenal,  as  assistant,  and  in 
September,  1886,  to  the  National  Armory  at  Spring- 
field, Massachusetts ;  then  to  the  St.  Louis  Powder 
Depot,  in  January,  1S88,  and  subsequently  to  the  com- 
mand of  the  Augusta  Arsenal,  Georgia,  his  present 
station. 

He  was  promoted  major  of  ordnance  September  15, 
1890. 

Major  Butler  is  the  son  of  John  B.  Butler,  major  and 
paymaster  in  Mexican  War,  on  staff  of  General  Taylor, 
and  later  in  Ordnance  Department,  U.S.A.,  and  grandson 
of  John  Butler,  whose  military  records  for  three  genera- 
tions extend  back  through  the  four  great  wars  in  which 
the  country  has  been  engaged, — the  war  of  the  Revolu- 
tion, the  War  of  18 12,  the  Mexican  War,  and  the  war 
of  the  Seceding  States,  1861-65.  Major  Butler  is  the 
author  of  "  Projectiles  and  Rifled  Cannon,"  and  of  vari- 
ous articles  and  publications  upon  the  subjects  of  ord- 
nance, the  national  defence,  etc.  He  is  also  the  inventor 
of  the  "  Butler  projectile,"  in  use  with  rifled  guns  for  the 
past  ten  or  twelve  years,  ami  in  the  proof  of  both  breech- 
and  muzzle-loading  guns  adopted  in  U.  S.  service. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


67 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL   RICHARD    N.  BATCHELDER. 

Brigadier-General  Richard  N.  Batchelder  (quar- 
termaster-general, U.S.A.)  was  born  in  New  Hampshire 
July  27,  1832.  At  the  outbreak  of  the  Rebellion  he  en- 
listed in  the  First  New  Hampshire  Regiment,  and  was 
appointed  regimental  quartermaster  April  30,  1861.  In 
fifteen  days  after  his  appointment  he  had  the  regiment 
uniformed,  armed,  and  equipped,  and  field-transportation 
provided  for  baggage,  tents,  and  supplies.  It  was  this 
comprehensive  grasp  of  details  and  this  energy  of  execu- 
tion which  early  brought  him  to  the  attention  of  field- 
commanders,  and  secured  for  him  rapid  promotion  until  he 
became  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
which  position  he  filled  with  great  credit  to  himself  dur- 
ing the  closing  year  of  the  war.  No  officer  of  the  Quar- 
termaster's Corps  was  complimented  with  more  brevet 
rank,  and  few  officers  of  the  line  or  staff  received  higher 
encomiums  in  official  reports.  He  was  appointed  captain 
and  assistant  quartermaster  and  assigned  to  duty  as  chief 
quartermaster,  Corps  of  Observation,  in  August,  1861.  He 
was  made  chief  quartermaster.  Second  Division,  Second 
Corps,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  March,  1862;  lieutenant- 
colonel  and  chief  quartermaster,  Second  Corps,  January, 
1863  ;  acting  chief  quartermaster,  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
June,  1 864  ;  and  colonel  and  chief  quartermaster,  Army  of 
the  Potomac,  August,  1864.  He  was  brevetted  major, 
lieutenant-colonel,  and  brigadier-general  of  volunteers, 
and  major,  lieutenant-colonel,  and  colonel,  United  States 
Army,  for  faithful  and  meritorious  service  during  the  war. 

It  was  as  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Army  of  the  Poto- 
mac, however,  that  his  great  powers  were  fullest  displayed, 
having  charge  of  the  immense  baggage-trains  of  that  great 
force,  the  duties  of  which  position  would  have  crushed 
the  ordinary  mind  ;  yet  he  handled  this  great  train  of  five 
thousand  wagons  and  thirty  thousand  horses  and  mules 
on  the  campaign  from  the  Rapidan  to  the  James  with 
a  magical  control.  Some  distinguished  officer  has  said 
"  that  a  man  who  can  successfully  handle  the  supply-trains 
of  an  army  is  capable  of  commanding  that  army." 

In  his  "  History  of  the  Second  Corps,"  General  Francis 
A.  Walker  says,  "  Colonel  Batchelder  was  one  of  the  best, 
if  not  himself  the  very  best,  contribution  made  by  the 
volunteer  force  to  the  supply  department  of  the  army. 
His  subsequent  promotion  to  be  chief  quartermaster  of 
the  Army  of  the  Potomac  and  his  present  high  position  in 
the  regular  army  are  evidence  of  the  manner  in  which  his 
duties  with  the  Second  Corps  were  discharged.  However 
exacting  the  demands  of  the  infantry  or  the  artillery,  of  the 
commissariat  or  the  hospital  service,  they  were  always  met, 
and  met  so  easily  that  it  seemed  the  simplest  thing  in  the 


world  to  be  done.  It  was  impossible  that  the  roads  could 
become  so  bad  as  to  keep  the  Second  Corps  trains  back. 
No  matter  how  the  troops  were  marched  about, — by  day 
or  by  night,  in  advance  or  in  retreat, — the  inevitable  six- 
mule  wagon  was  always  closebehind.  .  .  .  The  service  ren- 
dered to  the  troops  by  this  sagacious  and  efficient  officer 
could  hardly  be  over-estimated."  "  It  is  with  officers  of 
such  qualifications  that  it  is  desirable  we  should  fill  up 
the  standing  army,"  wrote  Grant,  when  he  recommended 
Batchelder  for  appointment  in  the  regular  army.  Said 
the  gallant  Hancock :  "  I  consider  him  (Batchelder)  the 
most  efficient  officer  of  the  department  in  the  volunteer 
service."  Said  General  Meade :  "  General  Batchelder's 
services  for  the  two  years  I  commanded  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac  are  well  known  to  me.  He  not  only  managed 
his  important  department  with  great  judgment  and  skill, 
but  rendered  me  essential  service  on  the  battle-field  as 
a  staff-officer,  showing  high  personal  gallantry  in  the 
immediate  presence  of  the  enemy."  "  No  officer,"  says 
Howard,  "  with  whom  I  have  had  the  fortune  to  serve 
ever  had,  at  all  times,  my  more  complete  confidence." 
"  He  has  not  a  superior  in  ability  and  experience.  Much 
of  the  success  of  my  department  is  due  to  his  untiring 
intelligence  and  faithful  service.  ...  He  merits  the  high 
commendation  awarded  him  by  all  his  superiors,"  was 
the  opinion  of  General  Ingalls,  who  was  Batchelder's 
superior  officer  in  the  Quartermaster's  Corps.  "  He  is 
one  of  the  most  intelligent  and  able  officers  of  the  Quar- 
termaster's Department.  I  greatly  relied  upon  his  ability 
and  zeal,  and  was  never  disappointed,"  wrote  Quarter- 
master-General Meigs. 


68 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   LESTER  A.  BEARDSLER,   U.S.N. 

Captain  Lester  A.  Beardslee  was  born  in  Little 
Falls,  New  York,  February  I,  1836.  Appointed  acting 
midshipman  March  5,  1850;  sloop  "Plymouth,"  East 
Indies,  May,  1851,  to  January,  1855;  participated  in 
one  battle  and  several  skirmishes  with  Chinese  army 
at  Shanghai;  Naval  Academy,  October,  1855,  to  June, 
1856. 

Promoted  to  passed  midshipman  June  20,  1S56;  steam- 
frigate"  Merrimac,"  special  service,  1856-57  ;  sloop  "  Ger- 
mantown,"  East  India  Squadron,  1857-60.  Promoted 
to  master  January  22,  1858.  Promoted  to  lieutenant 
July  23,  1859  ;  sloop  "  Saratoga,"  coast  of  Africa,  1S60-63. 
Promoted  to  lieutenant-commander  July  16,  1862;  mon- 


itor "  Nantucket,"  North  Atlantic  Squadron,  January  to 
May,  1S63;  participated  in  attack  of  the  iron-clad  fleet 
on  the  defences  of  Charleston  Harbor,  April  7,  1863; 
steam-sloop  "  Wachusett,"  special  service,  on  coast  of 
Brazil,  cruising  for  rebel  privateers,  ( )ctober,  1863,  to  Jan- 
uary, 1 865  ;  participated  in  capture  of  rebel  steamer 
"Florida"  at  Bahia,  by  "Wachusett,"  October,  1864; 
commanded  prize  steamer  "  Florida,"  from  October,  1864, 
and  brought  her  to  Hampton  Roads,  Virginia;  steam- 
sloop  "  Connecticut,"  special  service,  West  Indies,  1865  ; 
commanded  steam-gun-boat  "Aroostook,"  1S67-68, 
taking  her  to  East  India  Squadron  from  Philadelphia ; 
commanded  steamer  "  Saginaw,"  Pacific  Squadron,  Octo- 
ber, 1868;  executive  of  steam-sloop  "  Lackawanna,"  Pa- 
cific Squadron,  1868-69. 

Commissioned  as  commander  June  12,  1869;  Hydro- 
graphic  Office,  Navy  Department,  1869-70;  steamer 
"  Palos,"  April,  1870,  to  January,  1871  ;  took  her  to  East 
Indies;  Hydrographic  ( )ffice,  January,  1871-72;  Navy- 
Yard,  Washington,  May,  1872,  to  April  I,  1875;  mem- 
ber of  United  States  Board  for  testing  iron,  steel,  and 
other  metals,  April,  1875,  to  April,  1879;  commanding 
sloop  "Jamestown,"  Alaska,  April,  1879,  to  October, 
1880. 

Promoted  to  captain  November,  1880;  leave  of  ab- 
sence, 18S2-83;  commanding  receiving-ship  "Frank- 
lin," 1SS3-84;  commanding  steam-frigate  "Powhatan," 
June,  1884,  to  June,  1886;  Torpedo  Station,  1887;  wait- 
ing orders,  18S8;  commanding  receiving-ship  "Ver- 
mont," July,  1SS8-91. 

November  9,  1891,  assumed  command  of  Naval  Sta- 
tion, Port  Royal,  South  Carolina;  and  at  this  date — 
June,  1  S92 — he  remains  in  command  at  Port  Royal. 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


69 


CAPTAIN  JOHN   H.   CALEF. 

Captain  John  H.  Calef  (Second  Artillery)  was  born 
at  Gloucester,  Massachusetts,  September  24,  1841.  He 
is  the  great-grandson  of  Colonel  Jeduthan  Baldwin,  of 
the  Revolutionary  army,  first  colonel  of  engineers  of  the 
U.  S.  Army;  also,  a  great-grandson  of  Colonel  John  H. 
Calef,  of  Kingston,  New  Hampshire,  an  officer  of  the 
Revolutionary  army. 

Captain  Calef  graduated  at  the  V.  S.  Military  Academy 
June  17,  1862,  and  was  promoted  second  lieutenant  of 
the  Fifth  Artillery  the  same  day.  He  was  transferred  to 
the  Second  Artillery  October  6,  1S62,  and  served  in  the 
field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac.  He  participated  in 
the  Peninsula  campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  the  action 
of  Malvern  Hill  August  5,  1862;  in  the  Northern  Vir- 
ginia campaign,  and  engaged  in  the  battle  of  second  Bull 
Run  August  29,30,  [862;  in  the  Maryland  campaign, 
and  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Antietam  September  17, 
1862;  skirmish  at  Sharpsburg  September  19,  1862,  and 
march  to  Falmouth,  Virginia  ;  in  the  Rappahannock  cam- 
paign and  engaged  in  Stoncman's  raid  towards  Rich- 
mond;  in  the  battle  of  Chancellorsville  May  2-4,  1863, 
and  several  skirmishes;  in  the  Pennsylvania  campaign, 
in  command  of  his  batten1,  and  engaged  in  the  skirmish 
of  Upperville,  Virginia,  June  21-22,  1863  ;  battle  of  Get- 
tysburg, Pennsylvania,  Jul)-  1-4,  [863,  and  skirmishes  at 
Williamsport,  July  6,  Boonesboro,  Maryland,  July  8-9, 
and  Funkstown,  Maryland,  July  10,  1863  ;  and  in  pur- 
suit of  the  enemy  to  Warrenton,  Virginia;  in  the  Rap- 
idan  campaign  and  engaged  in  several  skirmishes  Sep- 
tember, 1863,  and  wounded  September  15  at  Raccoon 
Ford. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  of  the  Second  Artil- 
lery November  4,  1863,  and  was  on  leave  of  absence  from 
February  14  to  April,  1864,  when  he  rejoined  in  the  field 
and  participated  in  the  Richmond  campaign,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  battle  of  Cold  Harbor  June  I,  1864;  skir- 
mished at  Bottom  Bridge  June  3-4,  1864;  battle  of 
Trevilian  Station  June  11-12,  1864,  and  action  of  St. 
Mary's  Church  June  24,  1864.  He  was  then  on  sick 
leave  until  the  following  September;  but  rejoining  in 
the  field,  participated  in  the  Richmond  campaign  and 
was  engaged  in  the  siege  of  Petersburg  ;  combat  of  Boyd- 
ton  Plank  Road  October  27,  1864;  destruction  of  Stony 


Creek  Station  December  I,  1864,  and  skirmish  at  Belle- 
field  1  )ecember  9,  1864. 

Lieutenant  Calef  was  appointed  adjutant  of  the  Second 
Artillery  November  6,  1864,  and,  after  a  short  leave  of 
absence,  was  with  regimental  head-quarters  at  Fort 
Mcllenry  to  July,  1865,  when  the  regiment  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  Pacific  coast. 

He  was  brevetted  captain  July  6,  1864,  for  "  gallant 
and  good  conduct  in  the  battle  of  Gettysburg,  and  in  the 
campaign  from  the  Rapidan  to  Petersburg,  Virginia;" 
and  major  March  13,  1865,  "for  good  conduct  and  gal- 
lant services  during  the  Rebellion." 

Lieutenant  Calef  served  on  the  Pacific  coast  from 
1865  to  1872.  lie  was  judge-advocate  of  a  "travelling 
general  court-martial"  in  1868-69,  making  the  tour  of 
Arizona.  His  regiment  being  transferred  to  the  Atlan- 
tic coast  in  1872,  he  was  on  duty  at  Fort  McHenry, 
Maryland,  to  May,  1875,  when  he  was  ordered  to  the 
Artillery  School  at  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  remaining 
there  until  April  8,  1888,  during  which  time  he  was 
instructor  in  the  "  Art  of  War"  and  "  Tactics,"  and 
compiled  a  work  on  "  Military  Policy  and  History  of 
Ancient  and  Modern  Armies,"  and  one  on  "  Description 
and  Service  of  Machine-Guns." 

He  was  promoted  captain  of  the  Second  Artillery 
March  16,  1875,  and  is  at  present  on  duty  in  command 
of  Fort  Schuyler,  New  York. 


7° 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  A  XT'   NAVY  [regular) 


CAPTAIN  1).   F.  CALLINAN  (retired). 

Captain  D.  F.  Callinan  (retired)  was  born  in  county 
Kerry,  Ireland,  July  24,  1839.  ''e  carne  to  the  United 
States  when  a  boy.  Enlisted  in  Company  E,  First  In- 
fantry, September  5,  1S60.  Served  at  Forts  Arbuckle 
a\m\  Washita,  Indian  Territory.  Left  Indian  Territory 
for  Kansas  May  1,  [861,  the  command  consisting  of  six 
companies,  —  First  (now  Fourth)  Cavalry  and  five  com- 
panies First  Infantry, — under  command  of  Major  Emmy. 
During  the  first  day's  march  were  followed  by  Texan 
troops.  When  camp  was  reached  line  of  battle  was 
formed,  Company  E,  First  Infantry,  as  artillery;  the 
cavalry  were  sent  out  and,  without  filing  a  shot,  made 
the  Texans  prisoners.  Next  morning  they  were  given 
hack  their  arms  ami  released,  Arrived  at  Fort  Leaven- 
worth May  31. 

In  June  assisted  in  the  capture  of  a  company  of  rebels 
at  Liberty,  Missouri,  who  were  a  few  hours  afterwards 
given  back  their  arms  (shot-guns  and  squirrel-rifles)  and 
released.  The  command  returned  to  Leavenworth,  re- 
maining a  few  1  lays  at  Kansas  City.  He  was  appointed 
corporal  August  1,  1861,  and  quartermaster-sergeant 
of  post  on  September  15  ;  appointed  first  sergeant  in 
January,  1862,  and  scouted  through  Missouri  in  1862. 
lie  was  stationed  at  Fort  Scott,  Kansas,  during  the 
winter,  and  returned  to  Fort  Leavenworth  in  February, 
[863;  resigned  the  position  of  first  sergeant,  and  was 
appointed  sergeant-major  of  post.  He  joined  his  regi- 
ment in  the  Army  of  the  Tennessee,  operating  against 
Vicksburg  ;  was  acting  sergeant-major  of  battalion  for 
about    two   weeks  ;    asked  a  volunteer   officer  who   sat 


beside  him  one  day  what  he  thought  of  Vicksburg,  etc.  ; 
the  officer  said  he  did  not  know,  and  inquired  the  ser- 
geant's opinion.  The  sergeant  said  if  Grant  was  the  man 
they  said  he  was,  they  would  have  it  by  the  Fourth  of 
July  anyhow.  After  the  officer  left,  the  men  informed 
him  that  it  was  General  Grant  to  whom  he  was  talking. 
A  few  days  after  this  he  was  placed  in  command  of  a 
siege-gun  within  a  short  distance  of  Fort  Hill,  and 
remained  in  command  until  the  surrender. 

In  August,  1863,  he  was  appointed  first  lieutenant  of 
colored  troops,  and  reported  to  Brigadier-General  J.  P. 
Hawkins  as  aide-de-camp.  October  2  he  received  the 
appointment  of  second  lieutenant  First  Infantry,  and  was 
appointed  commissary  of  musters,  acting  assistant  adju- 
tant-general, acting  inspector-general,  and  acting  ordnance 
i  ifficer.  He  was  relieved  at  his  own  request  in  May,  1 864, 
and  joined  his  regiment  in  New  Orleans,  and  promoted 
first  lieutenant  in  1S66.  He  was  almost  constantly  in 
command  of  companies  until  November,  1867,  when  he 
was  appointed  commandant  of  the  New  Orleans  military 
prison.  He  turned  the  building  over  to  the  civil  author- 
ities in  August,  1868,  and  again  took  command  of  his 
company.  He  was  quartermaster  and  commissary  at 
Fort  Brady,  Michigan,  from  July,  1869,  to  October,  1871, 
the  last  six  months  being  also  post-adjutant.  He  was 
in  command  of  about  one  hundred  recruits  at  Fort 
Wayne,  Michigan,  from  January  to  May,  1874;  post 
quartermaster  and  commissary  of  Fort  Sully,  1  )akota, 
from  July,  1874,10  July,  1875  ;  commanding  detachment 
of  recruits  at  Fort  Randall  during  the  winter  of  1876-77; 
in  Chicago  during  labor  riots.  In  November,  sent  to 
New  Spotted  Tail  Agency,  to  superintend  construction 
of  barracks  ;  on  leave  of  absence  for  four  months,  from 
September,  1878;  promoted  captain  Jul)-  1,  1879,  and 
stationed  at  Forts  Sully  and  Meade  from  July,  1879,  to 
May,  1880;  employed  with  company  in  building  road  at 
mouth  of  Pecos  River  from  December,  1SS0,  to  March, 
1881  ;  building  road  into  pinery,  near  Fort  Davis,  Texas, 
December,  1 881,  and  January,  1SS2  ;  took  part  in  Apache 
campaign  in  Arizona  and  New  Mexico  in  1882;  on  gen- 
eral recruiting  from  October,  1SX4,  to  October,  1886;  on 
leave  for  four  months  ;  in  command  of  Angel  Island 
March  and  April,  1888;  in  summer  camp  at  Santa  Bar- 
bara ;  in  command  of  Angel  Island  January  to  March, 
[889  ;  member  of  board  to  locate  quarantine  station  ;  in 
summer  camp  at  Monterey  and  Santa  Cruz,  California  ; 
on  sick  leave  for  six  months  from  January,  1890;  took 
part  in  Sioux  campaign,  1890-91  ;  on  sick  leave  for  two 
months  from  January,  1 891;  in  command  of  company 
from  April  to  October  29,  1 891.    Retired  October  22,  [891. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


/i 


COLONEL  JOHN  CAMPBELL  (retired). 

Colonel  John  Campbell  (retired)  entered  the  United 
States  service  as  an  acting  assistant  surgeon  June  II, 
1X47,  and  arrived  at  Vera  Cruz,  Mexico,  July  20  follow- 
ing, when  he  was  placed  on  duty  at  the  Castle  of  San 
Juan  d'Ulloa,  from  which  duty  he  was  relieved  in  October, 
and  ordered  to  the  command  of  Major-General  Patterson. 
He  arrived  in  the  City  of  Mexico  December  7,  1847,  and 
on  the  13th  of  the  same  month  was  appointed  assistant 
surgeon  U.  S.  Army.  He  was  afterwards  transferred 
to  Tacubaya.  He  returned  to  Albany,  New  York,  in 
July,  1848,  and  was  ordered  to  New  Orleans,  where  he- 
reported  October  24,  1848,  and  was  then  directed  to  pro- 
ceed to  San  Antonio,  Texas,  where  he  remained,  dointr 
duty  at  various  points,  until  the  early  part  of  1850,  when 
he  was  directed  to  proceed  to  California  via  the  Isthmus 
of  Panama.  He  arrived  at  Monterey,  California,  after  a 
voyage  of  sixty-five  days  from  Panama,  and  was  subse- 
quently stationed  at  Benicia  and  Sonoma. 

In  Ma>-,  1 85  1,  Dr.  Campbell  was  detailed  to  accom- 
pany the  escort  to  the  Indian  Commissioner,  and  in  Jul)' 
arrived  at  Camp  Bidwell,  California,  returning  to  Sonoma 
in  September  following.  In  October,  1851,  he  was 
ordered  with  two  troops  of  the  first  Dragoons  on  an 
expedition  to  Port  Orford,  Oregon,  and  was  engaged  in 
a  skirmish  with  Indians  on  the  Coquilla  River.  He  re- 
turned to  Benicia  December  12,  185  1.  After  serving  at 
various  other  stations,  and  having  had  six  months'  leave 
of  absence,  he  was  ordered  to  report  to  the  head-quarters 
of  the  army  at  New  York  City,  from  Albany,  New  York, 
September  28,  1854,  and  was  stationed  successively  at 
Fort  Wood,  West  Point,  Carlisle  Barracks,  Fort  Craw- 
ford, Minnesota,  Fort  Ridgely,  Minnesota,  and  was  then 
assigned  to  duty  with  a  battalion  of  the  Second  Infantry, 
August  22,  1856,  on  the  march  to  the  Missouri  River, 
where  they  arrived,  opposite  Fort  Pierre,  September  23 
of  that  year.  On  the  6th  of  November  he  was  directed 
to  proceed  to  Fort  Leavenworth,  and  there  received 
a  leave  of  absence,  rejoining  for  duty  at  West  Point 
June  1,  1857. 

At  the  commencement  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion, 
Dr.  Campbell  was  on  duty  at  Plattsburg  Barracks,  New 
York,  and  on  the  29th  of  January,  1861,  accompanied 
the  two  companies  stationed  there  to  Baltimore,  Mary- 
land. On  the  2 1st  of  July,  1862,  he  arrived  at  New  York 
from  Pensacola,  Florida,  and  was  stationed  in  and  about 
that  city  until  August,  1863,  when  the  Board  for  Retire- 


ment of  Officers,  of  which  Dr.  Campbell  was  a  member, 
was  transferred  to  Wilmington,  Delaware. 

On  the  1st  of  October,  1863,  he  was  transferred  to 
Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  as  medical  director  of  the 
Department  of  the  Susquehanna,  which  he  retained  until 
October  28,  1 865,  when  he  was  detailed  as  attending 
surgeon-in-charge  of  invalid  officers.  He  continued  on 
this  duty  to  November  23,  1865,  when  he  was  ordered  to 
Augusta,  Georgia,  as  medical  director  of  the  Department 
of  Georgia.  On  the  26th  of  June,  1866,  he  was  transferred 
to  Madison  Barracks,  New  York,  remaining  there  until 
November  25,  1867,  when  assigned  to  duty  at  Fort  Trum- 
bull, Connecticut. 

In  1870  he  was  ordered  to  the  Department  of  Dakota, 
and  assigned  to  duty  temporarily  as  medical  director,  but 
subsequently  ordered  to  duty  at  Fort  Randall,  Dakota, 
where  he  remained  until  1872,  when  his  station  was 
changed  to  Fort  Adams,  Rhode  Island.  In  1S78  he  was 
ordered  to  Atlanta,  Georgia,  as  medical  director  of  the 
Department  of  the  South.  In  1880  he  was  at  Newport 
Barracks,  Kentucky,  and  remained  on  duty  there  until 
1883,  when  he  was  ordered  to  New  York  City,  where  he- 
was  attending  surgeon  until  retired  from  active  service 
September  16,  1885. 

Dr.  Campbell  was  promoted  captain  and  assistant  sur- 
geon December  13,  1852;  major  and  surgeon  May  21, 
1861  ;  lieutenant-colonel  and  surgeon  November  8,  1877  ; 
and  colonel  and  surgeon  December  7,  1884. 


72 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD  NAVY  (regular) 


BRIGADIER-  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  EDWARD 
R.  S.  CANBY  (deceased). 

Brigadier-  and  Brevet  Major-General  Edward  R. 
S.  Canby  was  born  in  Kentucky  and  graduated  from  the 
U.  S.  Military  Academy  in  the  class  of  1839.  He  was 
promoted  upon  graduation  as  second  lieutenant.  Second 
Infantry,  July  1,  1839.  During  part  of  the  Florida  War 
(1839-42)  he  was  on  duty  as  quartermaster;  1840-42, 
assisted  in  conducting  the  emigrating  Indians  to  Arkan- 
sas, after  which  he  performed  garrison  duty  at  Fort 
Niagara,  New  York,  to  1845,  and  was  in  recruiting  ser- 
vice from  1845  to  1846.  From  March  24,  1  S46,  to  March 
3,  1847,  he  was  adjutant  of  the  Second  Infantry,  and 
while  serving  in  this  capacity  was  promoted  first  lieuten- 
ant Second  Infantry,  June  18,  1  S46. 

He  was  brevetted  captain  of  staff  and  served  as 
assistant  adjutant-general  from  March  3,  1847,  to  March 
3,  1855.  During  the  war  with  Mexico,  1846-48,  he  was 
engaged  in  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz,  March  9-29,  1847; 
and  participated  in  the  battles  of  Cerro  Gordo  April  17-18, 
1847;  Contreras,  August  19-20,  1847,  and  Cherubusco, 
August  20,  1847;  and  was  brevetted  major  "  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  conduct  in  the  battles  of  Contreras  and 
Cherubusco,  Mexico."  He  participated  in  the  assault 
and  capture  of  the  City  of  Mexico  September  13-14,  1847, 
and  was  "brevetted  lieutenant-colonel  September  13, 
1S47,  for  gallant  conduct  at  the  Belen  Gate  of  the  City 
of  Mexico." 

During  1847  and  184.X  he  was  assistant  adjutant-gen- 
eral of  General  Riley's  brigade,  and  from  February  2~, 
1 S49,  to  February  22,  1851,  he  served  in  the  same 
capacity  to  the  Pacific  Division.  On  February  22,  1851, 
he  was  ordered  to  Washington,  D.  C,  for  duty  in  the 
adjutant-general's  office,  and  remained  on  duty  there  until 
March  3,  1 S55,  on  which  date  he  was  promoted  major 
Tenth  Infantry. 


While  on  duty  in  the  adjutant-general's  office  he  made 
a  tour  of  inspection  of  the  posts  on  the  Arkansas  and 
Red  Rivers  in  Florida,  and  on  the  Gulf  coast  east  of  the 
Mississippi  River,  November  30,  1S53,  to  July  15,  1854. 
He  performed  the  usual  garrison  duties  at  Carlisle  bar- 
racks, Pennsylvania,  1855,  and  frontier  duty  at  the  posts 
of  Fort  Crawford,  Wisconsin,  1855-56;  Fort  Snelling, 
Minnesota,  1856-57;  and  at  Fort  Garland,  New  Mexico, 
i860.  He  accompanied  the  Utah  expedition,  1857-60, 
and  commanded  the  Navajo  expedition  in  1860-61. 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  Nineteenth  In- 
fantry May  14,  1 86 1,  and  was  in  command  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  New  Mexico  from  June  2^,,  1861,  to  September 
18,  1862.  During  January  and  February,  1862,  he  was 
engaged  in  the  defence  of  Fort  Craig,  New  Mexico,  and 
participated  in  the  combat  of  Valverde,  February  21, 
1S62,  and  action  of  Pualta,  April  15,  1862. 

On  March  31,  1S62,  he  was  commissioned  brigadier- 
general  U.  S.  Volunteers  and  was  placed  in  command  of 
the  draft  rendezvous  at  Pittsburg,  Pennsylvania,  March 
7,  1862,  to  January  15,  1863  ;  detailed  on  special  duty  in 
the  War  Department  until  May  7,  1864,  and  then  took 
command  of  the  city  and  harbor  of  New  York,  to  sup- 
press draft  riots. 

He  was  promoted  major-general  U.  S.  Volunteers  May 
7,  1864. 

He  was  in  command  of  the  Military  Division  of  West 
Mississippi  May  16,  1864,  to  June  3,  1865,  and  while  on 
a  tour  of  inspection  was  severely  wounded  by  rebel  gue- 
rillas on  White  River,  Arkansas,  November  4,  1864;  and 
in  command  of  the  forces  in  the  Mobile  campaign,  March 
to  May,  1865,  which  resulted  in  the  capture  of  Spanish 
Fort  April  8,  and  of  Blakely  April  9,  1865.  On  March 
13,  1865,  he  was  brevetted  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army 
for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of  Val- 
verde, New  Mexico.  On  April  12,  1865,  he  occupied 
Mobile,  Alabama  ;  and  Montgomery,  Alabama,  on  April 
2j,  1865;  ami  on  March  13,  1865,  he  was  brevetted 
major-general  U.  S.  Army  for  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices in  the  capture  of  Fort  Blakely  and  Mobile,  Ala- 
bama. 

The  rebel  arm)'  under  Lieutenant- General  R.  Taylor 
surrendered  to  him  April  4,  and  also  the  rebel  forces  in 
the  Trans-Mississippi  Department,  under  General  E.  K. 
Smith,  May  26,  1S65. 

Promoted  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army  July  28,  1866. 
He  was  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service  Septem- 
ber 1,  1866. 

General  Canby  twice  received  the  thanks  of  the  Presi- 
dent for  his  services. 

General  Canby  was  in  command  of  the  Department 
of  the  Columbia,  and  took  command  of  an  expedition 
against  the  Modoc  Indians  in  1873,  by  whom  he  was 
basely  murdered  on  the  nth  of  April  of  that  year. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


73 


COLONEL  CALEB  H.  CARLTON. 

Colonel  Caleb  II.  Carlton  (Eighth  Cavalry)  was 
born  in  Ohio  September  I,  1836,  and  was  graduated  from 
the  Military  Academy  in  the  Class  of  '59.  He  was  pro- 
moted brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Seventh  Infantry 
July  1,  1859,  anc'  second  lieutenant  of  the  Fourth  In- 
fantry October  12,  1859.  He  served  at  Newport  Bar- 
racks, Kentucky,  until  April,  i860,  and  was  ordered  to 
Jefferson  Barracks,  to  participate  in  Blake's  expedition 
from  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  to  Fort  Vancouver,  via  the 
head-waters  of  the  Missouri  River  and  Military  Road, 
which  occupied  him  until  the  following  October.  He 
was  then  stationed  at  Fort  Hoskins,  the  Presidio,  and 
San  Bernardino,  California,  to  October,  1861,  when  he 
was  ordered  East  with  his  regiment.  He  was  promoted 
first  lieutenant  May  14,  [861,  and  captain  June  30,  [862. 

Colonel  Carlton  was  on  provost  duty  with  his  regiment 
in  the  city  of  Washington  until  March,  1862,  when  he 
took  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  partici- 
pating in  the  Peninsula  campaign,  and  engaged  in  the 
siege  of  Yorktown,  battles  of  Gaines'  Mill,  Malvern  Hill, 
second  Bull  Run,  and  Antietam.  He  was  then  detailed 
on  recruiting  service  to  February,  1863,  and  then  on 
mustering  duty  at  Washington  to  June,  1K63.  He 
received  the  appointment  of  colonel  of  the  Eighty-ninth 
Ohio  Infantry  July  7,  1863,  and  participated  in  the 
campaign  of  that  year  with  the  Western  arm)-,  being 
engaged  in  the  battle  of  Chickamauga,  Kenesaw  Moun- 
tain, and  siege  of  Atlanta  in   [864. 

He  was  made  prisoner  of  war  September  20,  1863, 
and  held  by  the  enemy  to  March  7,  1864.  After  par- 
ticipating in  the  Atlanta  campaign,  he  was  placed  in 
command  of  the  post  of  Chattanooga,  Tennessee,  from 
October  17,  1864,  to  Ma)'  13,  [865,  and  was  then  com- 
manding the  Western  District  of  Kentucky  to  June  23, 
1865,  when  he  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the 
volunteer  service. 

Colonel  Carlton  then  joined  his  regiment  in  the  regular 
service,  and  commanded  the  Fourth  Infantry  at  Fort 
Wood,  New  York,  from  July  2^  to  September  28,  1865, 
when  his  regiment  was  ordered  to  the  Lakes,  and  he  took 
station  at  Fort  Ontario,  New  York. 

He  was  brevetted  major  Jul)-  4,  1S62,  for  "  gallant  and 
meritorious  services  during  the  Peninsula  campaign," 
and  lieutenant-colonel  September  20,  1863,  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of  Chickamauga. 

In  March,  1867, Colonel  Carlton's  regiment  was  ordered 
to  the  Plains,  and  he  served  respectively  in  camp  at 
Omaha,  and  in   garrison  at   Forts   Laramie  and    Fetter- 


\ 


man  until  March  23,  1869,  when  he  became  unassigned. 

He  was  then  detailed  as  professor  of  military  science 
at  Miami  University,  <  )hio,  and  remained  on  that  duty 
to  October,  1  87  1 ,  he  having  in  the  mean  time  been  assigned 
as  captain  of  the  Tenth  Cavalry  December  15,  1870. 
He  was  on  leave  in  Europe  from  November,  1S72,  to 
June,  1873.  He  joined  at  Fort  Sill,  and  was  in  the  field 
in  the  Kiowa  ,md  Comanche  expeditions  from  June, 
1 S73,  to  March,  1875,  and  then  was  ordered  to  Texas, 
taking  station  at  Fort  McKavett,  from  which  post  he 
took  the  field,  from  April  17,  1875,  to  July  11,  1876. 
lie  was  promoted  major  of  the  Third  Cavalry  May  17, 
1876,  and  was  in  the  field,  and  on  the  Cheyenne  expe- 
dition in  Dakota  and  Nebraska,  from  June  to  December 
21,  187S,  again  in  the  field  from  October  8  to  December, 
1879,  and  again  in  June,  1880.  He  was  on  sick  leave 
from  |ulv  S,  1SS0,  to  June,  iNSi.when  he  was  appointed 
inspector  of  national  cemeteries  to  April,  1882.  He 
was  again  on  leave  to  November,  1882,  when  he  joined 
his  regiment  in  Arizona,  and  marched  with  it  to  Texas 
in  the  spring  of  1SS5,  where  he  remained  until  Sep- 
tember, 1886,  and  was  at  Forts  Davis  and  Elliott  until 
July  25,  1887.  He  then  marched  with  a  battalion  of 
the  Third  Cavalry  to  Fort  Brown,  Texas,  a  distance  of 
one  thousand  miles,  arriving  there  October  20,  1SS7. 

Colonel  Carlton  was  promoted  lieutenant  -  colonel 
Seventh  Cavalry  April  11,  1889,  and  ordered  to  Fort 
Sill,  Indian  Territory,  September  5,  remaining  at  that 
station  until  promoted  colonel  of  the  Eighth  Cavalry, 
with  head-quarters  at  Fort  Meade,  North  Dakota.  He 
is  at  present  nil  leave  of  absence  in  California. 


74 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


PAYMASTER   JOHN   RANDOLPH   CARMODY,   U.S.N. 

Paymaster  John  Randolph  Carmody  was  born  at 
Mohawk,  New  York,  June  9,  1843.  In  July,  1862,  the 
subject  of  this  sketch  enlisted  in  the  navy,  and  served 
as  paymaster's  writer  and  clerk  in  the  James  and  York- 
Rivers,  being  present  at  many  skirmishes  and  reconnois- 
sances.  As  soon  as  he  attained  his  majority  he  was  ap- 
pointed an  acting  assistant  paymaster.  He  served  in  the 
"  Cincinnati,"  on  the  Mississippi,  under  Admiral  Porter, 
and  was  present  at  the  operations  on  the  Cumberland  and 
Tennessee  Rivers  which  resulted  in  the  defeat  of  the  Con- 
federate army  under  Hood.  During  these  operations  he 
was  employed  in  volunteer  reconnoissance  service  on 
shore,  which  he  performed  so  satisfactorily  as  to  elicit 
a  letter  of  special  commendation  from  his  commanding 
officer. 

Paymaster  Carmody  participated  in  the  siege  and  cap- 
ture of  Mobile  in  the  spring  of  1865,  and  was  present 
at  the  surrender  of  the  rebel  naval  forces  on  the  Tombig- 
bee  River  at  the  close  of  the  war.  He  continued  to  serve 
in  the  West  Gulf  Squadron  until  July,  [866,  when,  in 
recognition  of  his  good  war  record,  he  was  appointed  an 
assistant  paymaster  in  the  regular  navy.  During  the 
next  two  years  he  was  again  in  the  Gulf  of  Mexico,  while 
we  were  watching  the  events  connected  with  Maximilian's 
assumption  of  the  imperial  crown  under  the  auspices  and 
with  the  support  of  Louis  Napoleon. 

Mr.  Carmody  was  made  passed  assistant  paymaster  in 
[868,  and  again  went  to  Southern  waters  in  the  "  Yantic," 
which  vessel  was  for  nearly  a  year  constantly  employed 
about  Hayti,  protecting  American  interests  during  a 
bloody  revolution.  The  ship  was  then  disabled  by  the 
serious  outbreak  of  yellow  fevur,  which  carried  off  many 


of  the  officers  and  crew.  Paymaster  Carmody  survived 
an  attack  of  the  disease,  but  never  fully  recovered  his 
health. 

After  the  Franco-Prussian  War,  when  Congress  au- 
thorized the  conveyance  to  France  in  government  ves- 
sels of  contributions  to  aid  the  distressed  people  of  that 
country,  Paymaster  Carmody  was  sent  upon  that  busi- 
ness in  the  store-ship  "  Relief." 

On  returning  from  this  duty  he  was  stationed  at  New 
London  and  at  New  Orleans  as  disbursing  officer.  He 
was  then  ordered  to  the  "  Monocacy,"  on  the  China  and 
Japan  station,  where  he  remained  two  years.  From  [877 
to  [879  he  was  in  charge  of  the  naval  depot  at  Honolulu, 
Sandwich  Islands,  during  which  time  he  was  promoted 
to  be  paymaster,  with  rank  of  lieutenant-commander. 
He  was  next  attached  to  the  receiving-ship  "  Indepen- 
dence," at  the  navy-yard,  Marc  Island,  California,  for 
three  years. 

In  1883  the  Naval  Mutual  Aid  Association  selected 
Paymaster  Carmody  as  their  secretary  and  treasurer. 
The  Navy  Department  assigned  him  to  that  duty,  and 
he  spent  three  years  in  managing  its  affairs  and  building 
up  the  association,  to  the  expressed  satisfaction  of  its 
members. 

Having,  in  1886,  volunteered  for  duty  in  the  "  Vanda- 
lia,"  fitting  out  for  the  Pacific,  he  was  ready  to  sail  when 
he  was  detached  and  ordered  to  special  duty  as  assistant 
to  the  paymaster-general  of  the  navy.  He  was  specially 
employed  by  the  Secretary  of  the  Navy  in  the  work  of 
bringing  about  the  consolidation  of  the  accounts  of  naval 
stores  and  the  introduction  of  economic  and  business 
methods  in  the  purchase  and  care  of  supplies.  For  this 
service  he  received  a  most  complimentary  letter  from  the 
paymaster-general. 

Close  confinement  to  office-work  brought  a  renewal  of 
ill  health,  and,  in  hope  of  improvement,  he  applied  for  sea- 
duty.  Again  he  went,  in  the  steam-corvette  "  Galena," 
to  the  Home  Station  and  the  West  Indies  until  exposure 
to  tropical  climate  brought  on  a  recurrence  of  disease, 
and  he  was  invalided  home  in  1888.  In  the  following 
April,  at  his  own  request,  he  was  placed  upon  the  retired 
list,  under  the  category,  "  through  physical  incapacity 
resulting  from  long  and  faithful  service." 

Since  that  period  he  has  employed  himself  in  journal- 
istic writing,  and  has,  beside,  become  actively  identified 
with  the  financial  circles  of  the  capital  city.  Among  the 
moneyed  institutions  of  Washington,  he  was  one  of  the 
organizers  ami  directors  of  the  West  End  National  Bank, 
and  is  the  treasurer  and  a  director  of  the  largest  financial 
institution  in  that  city, — the  Washington  Loan  and  Trust 
Company;  also  member  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of 
the  Navy  Mutual  Aid  Association  and  the  Army  and 
Navy  Club,  and  is  a  companion  of  the  Military  Order  of 
the  1  .oval  Legion. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


75 


MAJOR  AND  BREVET   COLONEL  L.  H.  CARPENTER. 

Major  and  Brevet  Colonel  L.  H.  Carpenter  (Fifth 
Cavalry)  belongs  to  a  family  identified  with  the  early 
history  of  Philadelphia.  He  is  a  lineal  descendant  of 
Thomas  Lloyd,  first  governor  of  the  province  of  Penn- 
sylvania, and  of  Samuel  Carpenter,  first  treasurer  of 
that  province  and  also  a  member  of  Penn's  Provincial 
Council. 

Colonel  Carpenter  was  born  at  Glassborough,  New  Jer- 
sey, February  i  r,  1839.  He  was  graduated  at  the  Phila- 
delphia High  School,  and  remained  for  some  time  at  the 
University  of  Pennsylvania.  He  was  a  student  when  the 
war  broke  out,  and  enlisted  in  the  Sixth  Cavalry  No- 
vember i,  1 86 1,  and  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant, 
Sixth  Cavalry,  Jul)'  17,  1862.  He  served  in  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac  during  a  portion  of  the  Peninsula  campaign  ; 
was  in  the  retreat  to  Yorktown,  and  in  the  cavalry  cover- 
ing Washington  after  the  second  battle  of  Bull  Run,  and 
was  engaged  in  the  cavalry  operations  and  skirmishes 
connected  with  the  advance  of  the  army  after  Antie- 
tam.  He  participated  at  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg, 
Stoneman's  raid,  and  action  at  Beverly  Ford  June  9, 
1863. 

Colonel  Carpenter  was  appointed  acting  adjutant,  Sixth 
Cavalry,  June  12,  1863,  and  served  in  the  campaign  of 
Gettysburg, — in  various  actions  and  combats,  and  in  the 
battle  of  Gettysburg  on  July  3,  1863,  and  in  pursuit  of  the 
enemy;  and  in  the  Mine  Run  expedition.  May  4,  1864, 
he  was  detailed  as  acting  aide-de-camp  on  the  staff  of 
Major-General  Sheridan,  commanding  Cavalry  Corps, 
and  was  engaged  in  the  Richmond  campaign, — battle  of 
the  Wilderness,  Todd's  Tavern,  Sheridan's  raid  around 
Richmond,  May  9-24,  1864;  battles  of  Yellow  Tavern, 
where  Stuart  was  killed ;  combat  of  Meadow  Bridge, 
May  27,  1864  ;  guided  advance  of  the  Army  of  the  Poto- 
mac from  Chesterfield  Station,  on  the  North  Anna,  to 
Hanovertown,  en  route  to  Cold  Harbor ;  engaged  in  pre- 
liminary actions  and  battle  of  Cold  Harbor  ;  in  Sheridan's 
raid  towards  Gordonsville,  June  7-28,  1864;  battle  of 
Trevilian  Station,  June  11-12,  1864;  siege  of  Peters- 
burg, and  many  actions  in  connection  therewith.  On 
August  10,  1864,  he  joined  the  Army  of  the  Shenandoah 
as  acting  aide-de-camp  on  the  staff  of  General  Sheridan, 
commanding,  and  was  engaged  in  many  actions  in  the 
Shenandoah  Valley  and  in  the  battles  of  Winchester  and 
Fisher's  Hill. 

He  was  appointed  lieutenant-colonel,  Fifth  U.S.  Colored 
Cavalry,  September  28,  1864  and  on  October  2,  1864  was 
ordered  to  Kentucky,  commanding  the  regiment  and  post 
of  Camp  Nelson,  Kentucky.  lie  was  promoted  colonel, 
Fifth  U.S.  Colored  Cavalry,  October  28,  1865,  and  mus- 
tered out  of  the  volunteer  service  at  Helena,  Arkansas, 
March  15,  1866. 


Colonel  Carpenter  was  appointed  captain,  Tenth  Cav- 
alry, July  28,  1866.  He  has  served  since  the  war  on  the 
plains,  in  the  Indian  campaigns  of  1868  and  1874,  against 
the  Sioux,  Cheyennes,  Comanches,and  Kiowas  in  Kansas 
and  the  Indian  Territory, — that  of  1868  being  in  relief 
of  Colonel  Forsythe's  command  by  a  forced  march,  and 
other  Indian  scouts. 

Colonel  Carpenter  has  been  a  member  of  numerous  im- 
portant boards,  among  which  was  the  Cavalry  Equipment 
Board  at  Fort  Leavenworth  and  Watervliet  Arsenal  in 
1873,  and  Board  for  Purchase  of  Cavalry  Horses  for  the 
Department  of  Texas  in  1S76.  He  assisted  in  quelling 
a  riot  of  Mexicans  at  San  Martin,  Texas,  in  1877-78,  and 
subsequently  engaged  in  a  campaign  against  the  Apaches 
in  Northwestern  Texas  in  1880.  He  was  on  leave  of 
absence  in  Europe  in  1881-82,  and,  after  rejoining  his 
regiment,  marched  with  it  down  the  Platte  from  Laramie 
to  Kansas  in  1885,  and  the  same  year  was  detached,  with 
four  troops,  to  Fort  Reno,  Indian  Territory,  to  provide 
against  an  outbreak  of  Cheyennes. 

Colonel  Carpenter  was  brevetted  during  the  war  to 
lieutenant-colonel  in  the  regular  army  and  to  colonel  of 
volunteers  for  gallant  services  at  Gettysburg,  Winches- 
ter, and  services  during  the  war,  and  brevetted  colonel 
in  the  regular  army  for  gallant  services  in  the  action 
with  Indians  on  Beaver  Creek,  Kansas,  October  28, 
1868.  He  was  also  mentioned  in  general  orders  for 
same  engagement. 

He  received  his  promotion  to  major.  Fifth  Cavalry, 
February  17,  1X83,  and  commanded  Fort  Robinson, 
Nebraska,  1883-85.  He  served  at  Fort  Supply,  1885— 
87,  and  commanded  Fort  Myer,  Virginia,  1887-91.  He 
is  now  serving  at  Fort  Reno,  Oklahoma  Territory. 


76 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  regular) 


MAJOR  HENRY  CARROLL. 

Major  Henry  Carroll  (First  Cavalry)  was  born  in 
Copenhagen,  Lewis  County,  New  York,  May  20,  [838. 
He  moved  to  Minnesota  in  i858,and  enlisted  asaprivate 
in  Light  Battery  E,  Third  Artillery,  January  13,  1859,  at 
Fort  Ridgely,  Minnesota.  He  served  through  the  grades 
of  corporal,  sergeant,  and  first  sergeant  to  July  I,  1861. 
He  participated  in  an  expedition  against  the  Sioux 
Indians  in  the  summer  of  1851)  in  Dakota  Territory,  and 
took  part  in  the  occupation  of  Alexandria,  Virginia,  in 
Ma)-,  1 86 1,  followed  by  a  reconnoissance  and  engage 
nient  at  Blackburn's  Ford,  July  18,  and  battle  of  Bull 
Run,  July  21,  same  year.  In  October,  1861,  he  was  in 
an  expedition  to  Fort  Royal,  South  Carolina,  and  occu- 
pied Hilton  Head  in  November.  Fi  1862  he  was  at 
Fernandina  and  Jacksonville,  Florida,  in  March;  John's 
Island,  South  Carolina,  Ma)'  and  June,  and  James  Island 
same  month,  being  engaged  on  James  Island,  June  10,  in 
battle  of  Fort  Lamar  or  Secessionville  ;  in  bombardment 
and  capture  of  Morris  Island,  July  10,  1863;  attack  on 
Fort  Wagner,  July  10,  and  assaults  on  same  position 
August  23  and  September  7  following.  He  was  under 
fire  in  an  advanced  battery  alternate  days  during  the  siege 
of  Forts  Wagner,  Gregg,  and  Sumter,  and  was  presented 
a  medal  for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  August  2^, 
1863.      He  was  wounded  the  same  day. 

Having  been  discharged  January  13.  [864,  he  re- 
enlisted  in  Light  Batten-  G,  Third  Artillery,  at  Wash- 
ington City,  February  3,  1864,  and  joined  Ninth  Army 
Corps,  participating  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness  and 
the  movements  of  the  Ami)-  of  Potomac  to  Spottsyl- 
vania  until  May  11,  when  he  was  ordered  to  Wash- 
ington. 

He  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  Third  U.  S.  Cav- 


alry May  18,  1864,  and  joined  his  battery  at  Little  Rock, 
then  attached  to  the  Seventh  Army  Corps.  Participated 
in  operations  against  Confederate  cavalry  in  Arkansas  in 
1864-65,  and  was  quartermaster  of  the  Second  Cavalry 
Brigade  (Powell's)  and  depot  quartermaster  at  Duval's 
Bluff,  Arkansas,  from  June  to  November,  1865. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  April  14,  1866,  and 
was  en  route  to  Fort  Union,  New  Mexico,  through  the 
Indian  Territory,  from  May  to  August  of  that  year,  per- 
forming the  duties  of  adjutant  and  quartermaster.  He 
then  served  at  Fort  Stevens,  Colorado,  and  Los  Finos, 
New  Mexico,  to  January,  1867,  when  he  was  promoted 
to  a  captaincy  in  the  Ninth  Cavalry,  joining  the  latter  at 
Fort  Stockton,  Texas.  With  the  exception  of  a  tour  of 
recruiting  service  at  St.  Louis  and  Chicago  from  January, 
1873,  to  October,  1874,  Major  Carroll's  service  was  at 
numerous  posts  in  Texas  to  1876,  where  he  was  engaged 
in  scouting  after  Indians,  stock-thieves,  and  murderers  ; 
in  affair  with  Comanche  and  Kiowa  Indians  in  September, 
1869,  on  the  head-waters  of  the  Brazos  River,  and  in  the 
reconstruction  of  civil  affairs  in  Marion  Count)-  during 
January  and  February,  1870.  He  was  mentioned  in 
orders  from  head-quarters  Fifth  Military  District,  Austin, 
Texas,  in  November,  1869,  for  the  affair  on  the  Brazos 
River. 

Changing  station  to  New  Mexico  in  1876,  we  find  the 
major  engaged  in  the  following  affairs:  With  Apache 
Indians  at  Florida  Mountains,  September  15,  1876,  for 
which  he  was  mentioned  in  orders,  District  of  New 
Mexico  ;  with  Mescalero  Apaches  in  Sacramento  Moun- 
tains, July  22,  1878,  and  Dog  Canyon,  Sacramento  Moun- 
tains, August  5,  1878  ;  with  Apaches  in  the  San  Andreas 
Mountains,  February  3,  1880;  with  Victoria's  Apaches, 
San  Andreas  Mountains,  April  5-7,  1880,  where  he  was 
twice  seriously  wounded  on  the  6th,  and  was  mentioned 
in  orders,  District  of  New  Mexico,  and  recommended  for 
the  brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel.  After  this  affair  the 
major  was  granted  a  sick  leave  of  absence  until  March, 
1  88  1,  when  we  find  him  again  scouting  after  Ute  Indians 
in  Colorado  and  Utah  in  the  summer  of  that  year,  for 
which  he  was  mentioned  in  orders,  Fort  Lewis,  Colorado. 
He  was  again  in  an  affair  with  the  Chiracahua  Apaches 
at  Dragoon  Mountains,  Arizona,  October  4,  1881,  for 
which  he  was  mentioned  in  orders  in  the  field,  and  espe- 
cially mentioned  by  the  department  commander  of  Ari- 
zona, October,  1881. 

It  would  be  impossible  to  follow  the  major  in  his 
numerous  changes  of  station  in  this  short  sketch,  or  the 
duties  which  have  fallen  to  his  lot.  His  field  of  duty- 
was  removed  to  the  Indian  Territory  in  1 88 1 .  to  Nebraska 
in  1885,  and  in  that  year  to  Montana,  having  been  pro- 
moted major  of  the  First  Cavalry  July  3,  1885.  He 
took  part  in  the  Sioux  campaign  of  Dakota  from  No- 
vember 24,  1890,  to  February  5,  1891. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


17 


MAJOR-GENERAL   SAMUEL  S.  CARROLL,  U.S.A. 
(retired). 

Major-General  Samuel  S.  Carroll  (retired)  was 
born  in  Washington,  D.  C,  September  21,  1832,  and 
graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  July  1,  1S56.  He 
was  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Ninth 
Infantry  the  same  day.  He  was  promoted  second  lieu- 
tenant of  the  Tenth  Infantry  October  1,  1856;  to  a  first 
lieutenancy  April  25,  i86l,and  to  a  captaincy  November 
1,  1861. 

At  the  commencement  of  the  Rebellion  he  was  ten- 
dered a  first  lieutenancy  in  the  Nineteenth  Infantry 
May  14,  1861,  which  he  declined.  lie  was  appointed 
colonel  of  the  Eighth  Ohio  Infantry  December  7,  1861, 
and  commanded  this  regiment  in  Virginia  under  Gen- 
erals Kelly,  Lander,  and  Shields,  until  May,  1862,  when, 
by  the  order  of  Secretary  of  War  Stanton,  he  was  made 
acting  brigadier-general  of  volunteers,  and  nominated  for 
the  rank  of  brigadier. 

General  Carroll  was  assigned  by  General  Shields  to 
the  command  of  a  brigade,  and  served  in  Shields's  divi- 
sion, Ricketts's  division,  M<  Dowell's  corps,  and  Whip- 
ple's division  of  the  Third  Corps  until  April,  1863,  when 
he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  a  brigade  in  French's 
division  of  the  Second  Corps,  then  commanded  by  Gen- 
eral Couch,  and  subsequently  by  General  Hancock.  He 
commanded  this  brigade  until  May  13,  [864. 

During  this  period  of  servii  e  General  Carroll  partici- 
pated in  the  campaigns,  battles,  and  skirmishes  in  West 
Virginia  and  the  Shenandoah  Valley  under  Generals 
Kelly,  Lander,  and  Shields.  Joining  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac  in  the  fall  of  1862,  he  participated  in  the  Rap- 
pahannock campaign  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of 
Fredericksburg,  and  afterwards  in  all  t lie  actions  partici- 
pated in  by  the  Second  Corps  until  May  13,  1864.  He 
was  wounded  while  making  a  reconnoissance  at  "  Rapi- 
dan  Station,"  just  after  the  battle  of  Cedar  Mountain  in 
1862;  also  wounded  at  Morton's  Ford  February  6, 
1864;  also  wounded  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness, 
May  5  and  9,  and  again  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Spott- 
sylvania  Court-House  May  13,  1X64.  He  was  appointed 
brigadier-general  of  volunteers  May  12,  1864.  In  Feb- 
ruary, 1S65,  General  Carroll  was  assigned  to  the  com- 
mand of  the  Department  of  West  Virginia  for  about  six 
weeks,  then  to  the  command  of  a  division  of  the  First 
Veteran  Corps  (Hancock's)  in  the  Shenandoah  Valley, 


and  afterwards  at  Camp  Stoneman,  near  Washington, 
until  August,  1865,  when  the  division  was  disbanded. 

lie  received  the  following  brevets:  Major,  May  3, 
[863,  f>r  "gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle 
of  Chancellorsville ;"  lieutenant-colonel,  July  3,  1863,  for 
"  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania;"  colonel,  Ma)'  5,  1864,  for  "  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness, 
Virginia;"  brigadier-general,  March  13,  1865,  for  "gal- 
lant and  distinguished  services  in  the  eight  clays'  battles 
in  the  old  Wilderness  and  at  Spottsylvania  Court-House, 
Virginia;"  major-general,  March  13,  1865,  for  "gallant 
and  meritorious  services  in  the  field  during  the  war,"  and 
major-general  of  volunteers,  March  13,  1865,  for  "gal- 
lant and  meritorious  services  during  the  war." 

In  August,  1865,  General  Carroll  was  assigned  to  the 
command  of  the  Military  District  in  Virginia  under 
General  Terry,  which  he  retained  until  January,  1S66, 
when  he  was  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service.  In 
consideration  of  his  gallant  conduct  during  the  war,  he- 
was  tendered  the  lieutenant-colonelcy  of  the  Twenty-first 
United  States  Infantry  January  22,  1867,  which  he- 
accepted  April  I,  1867,  and  on  the  9th  of  June,  1869,  he 
was  retired  for  wounds  in  the  line  of  duty  on  the  rank  of 
major-general.  Since  retirement  he  has  lived  in  Mont- 
gomery Count)',  Maryland,  at  wdiat  is  now  the  suburban 
village  of  "Takoma  Park." 


78 


OFFICERS   OF  TUB  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  AUGUSTUS  LUDLOW  CASH.  U.S.N. 

Rear-Admiral  Augustus  Ludlow  Case  was  born  in 
Newburg,  New  York,  in  February,  1813,  and  appointed 
midshipman  in  1828.  After  cruising  in  Brazil  and  West 
Indies,  became  passed  midshipman  in  1834.  Served  on 
the  Coast  Survey  and  on  the  United  States  South  Sea 
Surveying  and  Exploring  Expedition.  While  absent  on 
latter  duty  commissioned  acting  lieutenant,  and  con- 
tinued to  serve  in  the  expedition  from  1837  to  1842. 

Commissioned  as  lieutenant  February  25,  1S41  ;  cruised 
in  frigate  "  Brandywine,"  East  Indies,  [843—45.  During 
Mexican  War,  in  schooner  "  Mahonese,"  brig  "  Por- 
poise," frigate  "  Raritan,"  sloops-of-war  "John  Adams" 
and  "  Germantown,"  Gulf  of  Mexico,  1846—48.  He  was 
present  at  and  participated  in  the  capture  of  Vera  Cruz, 
Alvarado,  and  Tabasco.  After  the  landing  of  the  troops, 
on  the  first  day,  was  in  charge  of  the  beach  and  superin- 
tended the  landing  of  men,  ordnance,  and  stores  for  the 
investment  of  Vera  Cruz.  Alter  possession  of  Laguna 
was  taken  by  the  "  Porpoise,"  he  was  despatched,  in  a 
"  bungo"  having  one  of  the  "  Porpoise's"  42-pounder 
carronades  mounted  on  the  bow,  with  Passed  Midship- 
man F.  K.  Murray  and  twenty-five  men,  up  the  Palisada 
River  to  the  town  of  the  same  name,  which  was  captured 
and  held  for  a  fortnight  against  a  large  body  of  cavalry 
which  almost  daily  threatened  an  attack.  The  object  of 
holding  the  town  was  to  intercept  and  capture  General 
Santa  Anna,  wdio,  it  was  supposed,  would  endeavor  to 
escape  to  Honduras  via  the  Palisada  passes.  Cruising 
in  sloop-of-war  "  Vincennes,"  Pacific  Ocean,  1849-51; 
commanding  sloop-of-war  "  Warren,"  Pacific  Squadron, 


1852—53  ;  light-house  inspector,  third  district,  New  York, 
1853-57. 

Commissioned  as  commander,  September  14,  1S55; 
waiting  orders  in  185S;  commanding  steamer  "Cale- 
donia," Brazil  Squadron  and  Paraguay  Expedition,  in 
1859;  waiting  orders  in  i860.  In  March,  1 861 ,  just  at 
the  commencement  of  the  Rebellion,  Commander  Case 
was  ordered  to  Washington  as  assistant  to  (then)  Com- 
modore Stringham,  in  the  Office  of  Detail;  but  on 
the  assignment  of  the  latter  to  the  command  of  the 
North  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  he  was  appointed 
fleet-captain  of  it,  and  with  him  joined  the  steam-frigate 
"Minnesota,"  at  Boston,  April  13.  Subsequently  served 
in  the  same  position  with  Flag-Ufficer  L.  M.  Goldsbor- 
ough  and  Acting  Rear-Admiral  S.  P.  Lee,  who  were 
successively  appointed  to  command  the  fleet,  1861-62. 
He  took  part  in  the  capture  of  Forts  Clarke  and  Hat- 
teras,  August  28  and  29,  1861  ;  Roanoke  Island,  Feb- 
ruary 7  and  8,  1862;  Sewell's  Point  (where,  in  passing 
the  heavy  fortifications  on  Craney  Island,  he  landed  from 
his  "  tug"  and  hauled  down  the  large  rebel  flag  there 
flying)  and  Norfolk,  May  10,  1862;  and  all  of  the  gen- 
eral active  operations  of  the  North  Atlantic  Fleet,  until 
January,  1863,  when,  it  being  understood  that  active 
operations  were  over,  and  that  the  duty  of  the  fleet 
would  be  mostly  confined  to  blockading,  he  was  assigned 
to  the  command  of  the  steam-sloop  "  Iroquois,"  which 
was  fitted  to  look  after  the  "  Alabama,"  but  was  after- 
wards attached  to  the  North  Atlantic  Squadron.  In 
charge  of  the  blockade  of  New  Inlet,  North  Carolina, 
1863;  cut  out  the  steamer  "Kate"  from  under  Fort 
Fisher  and  the  other  batteries  at  New  Inlet,  aided  by 
the  steamers  "James  Adger"  and  "Mount  Vernon,"  in 
August,  1863. 

Commissioned  as  captain  January  2,  1863;  special 
duty,  Washington,  in  1864;  navy-yard,  New  York-,  1864- 
65  ;  fleet-captain,  European  Squadron,  1865-66. 

Commissioned  as  commodore  December  8,  1867; 
light-house  inspector,  third  district,  New  York,  1867-69. 

Chief  of  Bureau  of  Ordnance,  1869-73. 

Commissioned  as  rear-admiral  May  24,  1872;  com- 
manding European  Squadron  1873-75,  aiu'  combined 
European  North  and  South  Atlantic  Fleets,  assembled  at 
Key  West,  Florida,  1874,  for  special  service  in  connec- 
tion with  the  steamer  "  Virginius"  difficulties,  and  for 
ordnance,  torpedo,  and  fleet-practice  and  tactics,  etc. 
Total  sea-service,  twenty-four  years  ten  months  ;  shore 
or  other  duty,  twelve  years. 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


79 


COLONEL    AND    BREVET   MAJOR-GENERAL 

SILAS  CASEY,   U.S.A. 

(deceased). 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General  Silas  Casey 
(deceased),  son  of  Elizabeth  (Goodale)  and  Wanton 
Casey,  and  nephew  of  Dr.  Lincoln  Goodale,  whom  he 
succeeded  in  1870,  was  born  in  East  Greenwich,  Rhode 
Island,  July  12,  1807;  died  at  Brooklyn,  New  York, 
January  22,  1882.  His  grandfather,  Silas,  an  extensive 
importing-merchant  before  the  Revolution,  and  his 
father,  Wanton,  who  was  educated  in  France  during 
Franklin's  residence  there,  were  natives  of  East  Green- 
wich. In  his  youth  was  educated  at  the  academy  in  his 
native  town  and  at  West  Point;  on  graduating  July  1, 
1S26,  was  appointed  brevet  second  lieutenant  in  Seventh 
Infantry,  stationed  at  Fort  Towson,  Arkansas.  His  sub- 
sequent commissions  are  as  follows  :  Second  lieutenant, 
1829;  assistant  commissary  subsistence,  February,  1836; 
first  lieutenant,  June,  1836;  captain,  July,  1839;  brevet- 
major  for  Contreras  and  Churubusco,  August  20,  1847; 
brevet  lieutenant-colonel  for  Chapultepec,  September  13, 
1847  ;  lieutenant-colonel  Ninth  Infantry,  March  3,  1855  ; 
brigadier-general  of  volunteers,  August  31,  1861  ;  colonel 
Fourth  Infantry,  October  9,  1861  ;  brevet  brigadier-gen- 
eral U.  S.  Army  and  major-general  volunteers  for  Fair 
(  )aks,  May  31,  1862;  brevet  major-general  U.  S.  Army, 
March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  dur- 
ing the  Rebellion. 

During  the  Florida  War  he  was  appointed  captain  in  a 
regiment  of  Creek  Indian  volunteers.  He  distinguished 
himself  in  the  battle  of  Pilaklikaha  (April  19,  1842),  and 
was  recommended  by  Colonel  Worth,  his  commander, 
for  the  brevet  of  major.  He  was  engaged  in  Mexico  in 
battles  of  Contreras  and  Churubusco  ;  and  at  the  storm- 
ing of  the  castle  of  Chapultepec,  while  leading  his  men 
through  a  terrible  fire,  was  severely  wounded  in  the  ab- 
domen when  near  the  Mexican  batteries.  For  his  services 
and  conduct  in  the  war  with  Mexico  he  received  a  beau- 
tiful silver  vase  from  the  inhabitants  of  his  native  town 
and  a  resolution  of  thanks  from  the  Legislature  of  Rhode 
Island.  In  November,  1 851,  while  stationed  in  Califor- 
nia, Casey  attacked  and  defeated  the  Coquille  River  In- 
dians, whom  he  completely  subdued. 

In  March,  1856,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Casey,  in  a  cam- 
paign of  twenty-five  days,  completely  subdued  the  Puget 
Sound  Indians  in  Washington  Territory.  Pending  the 
controversy  between  the  United  States  and  the  British 
government  respecting  the  boundaries  of  each  in  that 
Territory,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Casey  occupied  and  forti- 
fied San  Juan  Island,  which  place  was,  by  agreement  be- 
tween General  Scott  and  the  British  authorities,  afterward 
occupied  jointly  by  the  two  nations. 

Was  assigned  at  breaking  out  of  Civil  War  to  the  duty 


of  organizing  into  brigades,  disciplining,  and  instructing 
the  volunteer  troops  arriving  at  Washington,  D.C.  On 
March  22,  [862,  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  a 
division  in  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  accompanied 
it  under  General  McClellan  to  the  Peninsula.  Having 
been,  contrary  to  his  advice  and  opinion,  ordered  to  Seven 
Pines  1  Pair  Oaks),  where  his  division  was  within  six 
miles  of  Richmond  without  support  on  cither  flank,  he 
commenced  work  energetically,  digging  rifle-pits  and  cut- 
ting abatis  to  strengthen  as  much  as  possible  his  false 
position.  Here,  on  May  31,  Casey  was  attacked  by  an 
overwhelming  force  under  Generals  Longstreet  and  Hill, 
and  after  a  severe  conflict  of  three  hours  was  driven  from 
his  position  with  a  loss  of  fourteen  hundred  and  thirty 
in  killed,  wounded,  and  missing,  out  of  a  total  force  of 
less  than  five  thousand  men.  Says  an  eye-witness  :  "  The 
veteran  warrior  Casey  had  been  in  the  thickest  of  the 
fight,  directing  and  animating  .  .  .  and  nearly  one-third 
of  his  command  had  found  a  soldier's  death,  or  were 
maimed  and  helpless  from  the  fight." 

Besides  his  promotion,  General  Casey  received  the 
thanks  of  the  Legislature  of  his  native  State  for  his 
bravery  and  skill  in  this  battle.  On  June  30  he  was 
relieved  from  the  command  of  his  division  by  General 
McClellan,  and  ordered  to  the  White  House  on  the 
"  Pamunkey,"  where  he  successfully  performed  the  duty 
of  evacuating  that  depot,  destroying  supplies  that  could 
not  be  taken  away.  On  August  1 1  he  was  again  placed 
on  duty  to  receive,  organize,  and  instruct  the  volun- 
teers arriving  at  Washington ;  and  on  this  date  the 
system  of  tactics  for  the  United  States  Army  by  Casey 
was  adopted  by  the  government.  During  his  period  of 
duty  in  Washington  General  Casey  equipped,  organized, 
and  in  a  preliminary  manner  instructed  about  three 
hundred  thousand  volunteer  troops.  He  was,  in  July 
iS.  [868,  retired  at  his  own  request. 


So 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   SILAS  CASEY,    U.S.N. 

Captain  Silas  Casey  was  born  in  Rhode  Island  upon 
a  family  place  between  Kingston  and  Narragansett  Pier, 
on  September  11,  1S41.  His  father  was  General  Silas 
Casey,  of  the  U.  S.  Army,  whose  long  service  in  the  army, 
as  well  as  his  distinguished  conduct  in  McClellan's  Penin- 
sula campaign,  made  his  name  well  known  to  the  country 
at  large.  Captain  Casey's  brother  is  now  the  chief  of  the 
Engineer  Department  of  the  U.S.  Army;  and  another 
brother,  Lieutenant  Edward  Casey,  of  the  U.  S.  cavalry, 
was  foully  murdered  only  a  short  time  ago'  bv  Western 
Indians,  in  whose  interest  he  was  endeavoring  to  make 
parley.  It  was  a  most  lamentable  thing,  especially  as 
Lieutenant  Case}-  was  a  true  friend  of  the  Indians,  and 
had  succeeded — among  the  fust — in  drilling  some  of] 
them  into  soldiers. 

Captain  Silas  Casey  was  appointed  an  acting  midship- 
man in  September,  1856.  After  four  years  at  the  I'.  S. 
Naval  .Academy,  he  graduated  in  i860,  and  was  ordered 
to  the  steam-frigate"  Niagara,"  then  one  of  the  remarka- 
ble naval  vessels.     The  march  of  events  was   rapid   in 


those  days,  and  Casey  found  himself  a  master  in  the  navy 
in  1 86 1,  at  which  time  he  was  serving  off  Pensacola,  in 

engagements  with  the  Confederate  batteries. 

He  was  commissioned  lieutenant  in  July,  1862,  six 
years  alter  his  appointment  as  acting  midshipman,  and 
served  as  executive-officer  of  the  gun-boat  "  Wissa- 
hickon,"  on  the  South  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron, 
in  1862-63.  Was  in  several  engagements  with  Fort 
McAllister  during  1862.  He  served  in  the  first  attack 
upon  Charleston  under  Admiral  I)u  Pont,  and  then  for  a 
long  time  was  executive-officer  of  the  "  Quaker  City,"  in 
the  North  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  during  which 
period  he  participated  in  the  two  attacks  upon  Port 
Fisher. 

After  the  war  closed  he  was  navigating-officer  of  the 
"  Winooski,"  of  the  Atlantic  Squadron,  from  1865  to  1867. 
He  was  commissioned  as  lieutenant-commander  in  July, 
1866,  ami  was  then  stationed  at  the  U.  S.  Naval  Acad- 
emy for  three  years.  Lieutenant-Commander  Casey  was 
then  ordered  as  executive-officer  of  the  steam-frigate 
"  Colorado,"  flag-ship  of  the  Asiatic  Squadron,  where  he 
remained  from  1870  to  1873.  He  was  in  command  of 
the  battalion  of  sailors  from  the  fleet  in  the  Corean  expe- 
dition, and  the  assault  on  Fort  McKee  (Elbow  Fort), 
Seoul  River,  in  June,  1872.  Upon  his  return  from  this 
long  and  arduous  cruise,  he  was  upon  ordnance  duty  at 
the  Philadelphia  Navy- Yard  during  1873  and  1874.  Com- 
missioned as  commander  in  June,  1  874,  ami  in  1875-76 
was  in  command  of  the  "Portsmouth,"  sloop-of-war. 
He  was  inspector  of  the  Twelfth  Light-House  District 
from  1876  to  1879,  anc'  commanded  the  "  Wyoming"  and 
"  Quinnebaug,"  of  the  pAiropean  Squadron,  in  1880-S2. 
He  then  served  a  term  as  equipment-officer  at  the  Nav  v- 
Yard,  Washington,  I).  C,  and  was  inspector  of  the  Fifth 
Light-Mouse  District,  and  in  command  of  the  "  Dale," 
up  to  1889.  In  February,  1889,  he  was  commissioned 
captain.  I  le  was  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  U.  S.  S. 
"Newark',"  in  July,  1890,  which  command  he  still  re- 
tains. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


81 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  THOMAS    LINCOLN    CASEY. 

Brioadier-General  Thomas  Lincoln  Casey  (Corps 
of  Engineers)  was  born  in  New  York-.  He  is  the  son  of 
General  Silas  Casey,  deceased,  who  was  retired  as  colo- 
nel of  the  Fourth  Infantry.  Young  Casey  was  gradu- 
ated at  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  in  the  Class  of  1852, 
and  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Corps  of 
Engineers.  He  served  at  West  Point,  attached  to  the 
company  of  sappers,  miners,  and  pontoniers,  the  year  he 
graduated  ;  and  was  then  the  assistant  engineer  in  the 
construction  of  Fort  Delaware  and  works  of  harbor  and 
river  improvement  in  Delaware  River  and  Bay  until 
1854,  when  he  was  detailed  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Acad- 
emy as  assistant  instructor  of  practical  engineering,  and 
serving  with  engineer  troops  to  June  27,  1857  ;  then 
made  principal  assistant  professor  of  engineering,  which 
position  he  occupied  to  August  31,  1859. 

He  was  promoted  second  lieutenant  June  22,  1854, and 
first  lieutenant  December  1,  1856. 

Being  ordered  to  the  Pacific  coast  in  1859,  he  was  in 
command  of  a  detachment  of  engineer  troops  in  Wash- 
ington Territory,  and  in  charge  of  the  construction  of  a 
wagon-road  from  Vancouver  to  Cowlitz,  Oregon,  and  in 
selecting  and  surveying  military  reservations  on  Puget 
Sound  from  1858  to  1 861. 

He  served  during  the  rebellion  of  the  seceding  States 
as  engineer  at  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  on  the  staff  of  the 
general  commanding  the  Department  of  Virginia,  from 
June  11  to  August  15,  1861  ;  as  superintending  engineer 
of  the  permanent  defences  and  field  fortifications  upon  the 
coast  of  Maine,  and  on  recruiting  service  for  engineer 
troops;  on  special  duty  with  the  North  Atlantic  Squad- 
ron, during  the  first  expedition  to  Fort  Fisher,  North 
Carolina,  December  8-29,  1864,  and  as  member  of  special 
board  of  engineers  for  work  at  Willett's  Point,  New  York, 
from  April  7  to  June  20,  1865. 

He  was  promoted  captain  of  the  Corps  of  Engineers 
August  6,  1861,  and  major  October  2,  1863,  and  bre- 
vetted  lieutenant-colonel  and  colonel  March  13,  1865,  for 
"  faithful  and  meritorious  services  during  the  Rebellion." 

Colonel  Casev  was  member  of  the  board  of  engineers 


fir  work  at  Forts  Preble,  Scammel,  Knox,  and  Popham, 
from  August,  1865,  to  February,  1866,  when  he  was 
granted  leave  of  absence  from  July  26,  1866,  to  February 
25,  1867.  He  was  then  detailed  as  superintending  engi- 
neer of  the  construction  of  Forts  Preble  and  Scammel, 
Portland  harbor,  Maine,  and  other  important  works,  from 
March  1,  1867,  to  March  3,  1877,  when  he  was  appointed 
colonel  and  in  charge  of  public  buildings  and  grounds  at 
Washington,  D.  C,  retaining  this  position  until  April  1, 
1 88 1.  He  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  construction  of 
the  State,  War,  and  Navy  Department  building,  March, 
1877,  which  building  he  completed  March,  1888,  of  the 
Washington  National  Monument  in  1878,  which  he  com- 
pleted December  6,  1884. 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  Engineers  Sep- 
tember 2,  1874;  colonel  March  12,  1884,  and  brigadier- 
general  and  chief  of  engineers  July  6,  1888.  Since  that 
time  he  has  been  stationed  in  Washington,  D.  C,  at  the 
head  of  his  bureau.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Mas- 
sachusetts Society  of  the  Cincinnati  since  1882,  of  the 
National  Academy  of  Sciences  since  1890,  and  an 
"  Officer"  of  the  Legion  of  Honor  of  France  since  Jan- 
uary, 1890. 


82 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  [regular) 


COLONEL   ISAAC  S.  CATLIN. 

Colonel    Isaac    S.    Catlin    (retired)    was    born    at 

Oswego,  New  York,  July  8,  (835.  When  the  Rebellion 
was  inaugurated,  he  was  a  member  of  the  law-firm 
of  Tracy  and  Catlin  at  Owego,  New  York,  the  senior 
member  being  the  present  Secretary  of  the  Navy,  Hon- 
orable Benjamin  F.  Tracy.  Catlin  was  also  mayor  of 
Owego  at  that  time,  having  been  elected  in  November, 
[860,  without  opposition.  On  the  17th  of  April,  [861, 
the  date  el  Lincoln's  first  proclamation  for  volunteers, 
he  officially  approved  a  call  for  a  meeting  to  raise  a 
company  of  volunteers.  On  that  evening  he  enrolled 
himself,  with  others,  as  an  enlisted  man,  and  before  the 
meeting  adjourned  the  minimum  number  of  men  for  a 
company  was  enrolled,  with  himself  unanimously  elected 
as  captain.  It  is  claimed  to  have  been  one  of  the  first, 
if  not  the  very  first,  company  of  actual  volunteers  enlisted 
in  this  State.  The  company  was  attached  to  the  Third 
New  York  Volunteers.  Me  served  with  it  .it  Big  Bethel, 
Virginia.  In  March,  [862,  he  resigned  for  the  purpose 
of  raising  a  new  regiment,  and  when  General  B.  F. 
Tracy  was  assigned  to  the  Twenty-fourth  Senatorial  or 
Regimental  District  by  Governor  E.  D.  Morgan,  Catlin 
was  first  made  adjutant  of  the  post,  then  lieutenant-colo- 
nel of  the  One  Hundred  and  Ninth  New  York  Volun- 
teers. 

lie  served  in  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac 
during  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  ;  had  separate  command 
in  [863-64  at  Falls  Church,  Virginia,  which  was  kept 
in  active  service  watching  the  predatory  movements  of 
Mosby  and  other  guerillas;  in  May,  1  864,  his  regiment 
joined  the  Ninth  Corps,  and  was  assigned  to  the  First 
Brigade,  Third  Division;  he  was  sick  in  hospital  at 
Washington,  D.C.,  with  gastric  fever,  for  several  weeks 
after  the  action  at   Gaines'  Farm,  Virginia;   he   rejoined 


command  in  front  of  Petersburg,  Virginia,  July,  1864; 
and  on  July  30,  while  commanding  a  Provisional  Brigade 
of  three  regiments  at  the  battle  of  the  "  Crater,"  he  lost 
his  right  leg  and  received  other  severe  wounds.  As 
soon  as  he  recovered  sufficiently  to  walk  with  crutches, 
the  Secretary  of  War  assigned  him  to  duty  as  President 
of  a  Court-Martial  and  Military  Commission  at  Wash- 
ington, D.C.,  where  he  served  with  his  brevet  rank  of 
major-general  until  mustered  out  June  4,  [865.  In 
[867,  by  reason  of  the  severity  of  his  wounds,  he 
applied  for  a  captaincy  in  the  arm_\-,  to  which  he  was 
promptly  appointed;  and  in  May,  1S70,  he  was  retired 
as  a  colonel  of  infantry,  being  the  lineal  rank  he  held 
when  wounded.  He  participated  in  the  battle  of  Big- 
Bethel,  Virginia,  March,  1862;  Wilderness,  and  succeed- 
ing engagements;  Spottsylvania,  North  Anna,  Gaines' 
Farm,  and  other  engagements  from  the  Rappahannock 
to  James  River,  and  in  the  battle  of  the  "Crater,"  in 
front  of  Petersburg,  Virginia,  18(14.  After  the  wounding 
of  Colonel  Tracy,  May  6,  [864,  he  commanded  his 
regiment  in  all  engagements  up  to  Gaines'  Farm,  and 
commanded  a  Provisional  Brigade  at  the  battle  of  the 
"  Crater,"  as  stated  above. 

He  was  made  brevet  major  L'.S.A.  May  6,  1S67,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  the 
Wilderness,  Virginia;  brevet  lieutenant-colonel  May  6, 
[867,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle 
of  Petersburg,  Virginia;  brevet  brigadier-general  of 
volunteers  March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious 
services  during  the  war;  brevet  major-general  of  volun- 
teers March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services 
in  the  battles  before  Petersburg,  Virginia.  In  the  report 
of  Colonel  Frederick  Townsend,  commanding  (  >ne  Hun- 
dred and  Ninth  New  York,  with  regard  to  the  battle  of 
Big  Bethel,  Virginia,  he  said  of  him  :  "  He  was  at  Bethel, 
and  I  do  not  hesitate  to  say  there  was  no  man  or  officer 
more  distinguished  on  that  field  than  he." 

After  the  war,  in  1865,  he  was  nominated  for  District 
Attorney  of  Tioga  County,  New  York,  and  received  the 
largest  majority  ever  given  a  candidate  in  that  county. 
In  1  S70  he  was  appointed  assistant  United  States  District 
Attorney,  which  position  he  held  for  two  years,  and  then 
went  into  partnership  with  General  Tracy,  the  present 
Secretary  of  the  Navy,  in  the  practice  of  the  law.  In 
[874  he  was  nominated  for  District  Attorney  in  Kings 
County,  New  York,  but  subsequently  retired.  In  1S77 
he  was  again,  against  his  own  protest,  unanimously 
nominated  by  acclamation,  and,  overcoming  an  opposing 
majority  of  about  14,000,  he  was  elected  by  about  3000 
majority.  He  was  unanimously  renominated  by  accla- 
mation in  1S80,  and,  .welcoming  a  normal  opposing 
majority  of  9600,  he  was  elected  by  about  i  i ,ooo.  In 
[885  he  was  nominated  by  the  County  Convention,  by 
acclamation,  for  Surrogate,  but  declined  peremptorily. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


§3 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  HENRY  L.  CH1PMAN 
(retired). 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Henry  L.  Chipman  was  born  in 
Canandaigua,  New  York,  February  23,  1823.  He  en- 
tered the  volunteer  service  as  lieutenant-colonel  of  the 
Second  Michigan  Infantry  May  25,  1861,  and  resigned 
June  24,  1861,  to  accept  the  appointment  of  a  captaincy 
in  the  Eleventh  United  States  Infantry,  to  date  from  May 
14,  1 861 .  He  joined  head-quarters  Eleventh  Infantry 
at  Fort  Independence,  Massachusetts,  and  remained  there 
until  October  14,  assisting  in  organizing  the  regiment, 
and  was  then  ordered  to  Perryville,  Maryland;  and  was 
engaged  doing  guard  duty  here  until  March,  1862,  when 
he  joined  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  served  contin- 
ually with  this  army  until  April,  1864;  went  through 
the  Peninsula  campaign  under  General  McClellan  ;  on 
a  reconnoissance  from  the  Potomac  River  to  Leetown, 
Virginia;  the  troops  fording  the  river  had  continuous 
sharp  skirmishing  for  two  days,  until  the  command  re- 
crossed  the  river,  near  Shepherdstown,  Virginia,  he  being 
engaged  on  the  skirmish-line  the  most  of  the  time; 
March  21,  1863,  he  was  appointed  by  Major-General 
Meade  acting  assistant  inspector-general  of  the  Second 
Division,  Fifth  Corps,  (Sykes's  regulars)  and  was  on 
this  duty  until  April  1,  1864,  when,  having  been 
appointed  colonel  of  the  One  Hundred  and  Second  Regi- 
ment United  States  Colored  Troops,  he  left  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac  and  went  with  regiment  to  Hilton  Head, 
South  Carolina.  On  the  30th  of  August,  1864,  he  went 
with  regiment  to  Jacksonville,  Florida,  and  was  engaged 
in  destroying  the  railroad  leading  from  Jacksonville  to 
Tallahassee,  Florida  ;  built  an  earthwork  at  Magnolia, 
on  the  St.  John's  River;  and  was  then  sent  to  Beaufort, 
South  Carolina,  with  regiment,  where  he  remained  until 
November  30,  1864,  in  command  of  an  extended  picket 
line,  taking  in  three  of  the  Sea  Islands.  At  the  above 
date  he  started  with  five  companies  of  regiment  to  join 
an  expedition,  under  command  of  General  John  P.  Hatch, 
at  Boyd's  Landing,  South  Carolina,  for  the  purpose  of 
capturing  the  Charleston  and  Savannah  Railroad;  the 
result  was  a  severe  battle  at  Honey  Hill,  South  Carolina  ; 
he  commanded  a  brigade  a  part  of  the  time  during  this 
battle.  Two  days  after  he  commanded  a  reconnoissance 
towards  the  railroad,  about  five  miles  from  where  the 
battle  was  fought,  and  had  a  sharp  skirmish  with  the 
enemy.  On  the  9th  of  December,  1864,  another  attempt 
was  made  to  capture  the  railroad,  about  thirty  miles  dis- 
tant from  Honey  Hill,  and  in  this  affair,  which  was  quite 
severe,  he  commanded  a  brigade  composed  of  three  regi- 
ments and  a  battalion  of  sailors  and  marines  from  the 
navy ;  he  was  with  the  first  troops  that  entered  Charles- 
ton, South  Carolina.  On  April  1,  1S65,  left  Charleston 
with  two  wasfon-loads  of  ammunition  and  two  hundred 


and  fifty  men  to  join  an  expedition  at  Nelson's  Fern',  on 
the  Santee  River,  a  command  from  Georgetown,  South 
Carolina,  under  General  Potter;  on  reaching  the  ferry 
learned  that  he  had  gone  on  towards  Camden,  some  days 
before,  so  crossed  the  river  and  followed  his  command 
foi'  five  days,  fighting  his  way  through  to  him;  one 
officer  and  nine  men  were  wounded  and  one  man  killed 
while  making  this  march.  The  day  after  joining  General 
Porter  he  took  his  own  regiment  and  five  companies  of 
another  regiment  to  drive  the  enemy  from  a  strong  earth- 
work immediately  in  their  front  and  across  the  road  of 
the  line  of  march  ;  turned  the  enemy's  flank  and  drove 
him  out  after  a  severe  fight  of  thirty  minutes.  On  the 
17th  of  April,  1865,  while  on  the  march  back  to  George- 
town, the  enemy  sent  in  a  flag  of  truce  with  the  intelli- 
gence of  the  surrender  of  Generals  Lee  and  Johnston, 
and  of  the  assassination  of  President  Lincoln. 

Colonel  Chipman  also  participated  in  the  siege  of  York- 
town,  battles  of  Gaines'  Mill,  Malvern  Hill,  second  Bull 
Run,  Antictam,  Fredericksburg,  Chancellorsville,  Gettys- 
burg, and  affair  at  Rappahannock-  Station.  Was  bre- 
vetted  major  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at 
Chancellorsville,"  and  lieutenant-colonel  for  same  at  Get- 
tysburg ;  and  was  also  made  brevet  brigadier-general 
of  volunteers  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  during 
the  war.  Promoted  major  of  the  Third  Inf.  Oct.  1873, 
and  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Seventh  Inf.  May  19,  1881. 

When  the  Third  Infantry,  of  which  he  was  major, 
moved  from  Corinne,  Utah,  to  Helena,  Montana,  it 
marched  five  hundred  miles  in  thirty  days  over  the 
Rocky  Mountains,  when  the  temperature  at  times  was 
sixteen  degrees  below  zero  and  the  ground  covered  with 
snow,  which  had  to  be  scraped  away  to  pitch  tents. 

Colonel  Chipman  was  retired  from  active  service  Feb- 
ruary 1,  1887,  and  now  resides  in  San  Antonio,  Texas. 


84 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (xegvla/d 


CAPTAIN    WM.  H.  CLAPP. 

Captain  Wm.  H.  Clapp  (Sixteenth  Infantry)  was  bom 
in  Ohio,  September  7,  1S36,  and  at  the  breaking  out  of 
the  war  of  the  Rebellion  entered  the  volunteer  service 
as  a  private  in  Company  A,  of  the  Seventy-first  New 
York  Infantry,  April  19,  1861,  from  which  he  was  dis- 
charged July  30,  1861.  Feeling  still  the  ambition  to 
serve  his  country  after  his  first  three  months'  experience 
in  that  regiment  in  the  battle  of  the  first  Bull  Run,  he 
again  came  into  service  September  25,  1861,  as  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Forty-second  Ohio  Infantry,  and  was 
promoted  first  lieutenant  March  14,  [862.  He  was  an 
aide-tie-camp  of  volunteers  from  December  19,  1S61,  to 
April  1,  1862,  when  he  received  the  appointment  of 
adjutant  of  the  Forty-second  Ohio  Infantry,  and  was 
assistant  adjutant-general  of  volunteers  on  the  staff  of 
Major-General    Heron   from    May,    1862,  to  July,  1864, 


participating  in  the  campaign  in  Eastern  Kentucky,  and 
engaged  in  the  actions  of  Middle  Creek  ami  capture  of 
Cumberland  Gap.  lie  then  participated  in  the  Missis- 
sippi campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  the  action  of  Taze- 
well, Tennessee.  He  followed  the  fortunes  and  misfor- 
tunes of  the  army  in  the  investment  of  Vicksburg,  being 
engaged  in  the  first  assault  mi  the  works  about  that 
city,  the  action  of  Chickasaw  Bayou,  the  capture  of 
Arkansas  Post,  and  the  siege  of  Vicksburg.  He  was 
also  engaged  in  the  capture  of  Yazoo  City. 

He  was  appointed  captain  and  assistant  adjutant-gen- 
eral of  volunteers  May  15,  1863.  The  captain's  field 
of  duty  was  subsequently  transferred  to  Texas,  and  we 
find  him  present  at  the  capture  and  surrender  of  Browns- 
ville, Texas,  and  the  Trans-Mississippi  Department.  He 
was  honorably  mentioned  in  General  Orders,  by  Major- 
General  Heron,  for  conduct  at  the  siege  of  Vicksburg, 
and  received  the  brevets  of  major  and  lieutenant-colonel 
of  volunteers  March  13,  1865,  for  "  faithful  and  merito- 
rious services  during  the  war." 

Captain  Clapp  entered  the  regular  service  as  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Eleventh  United  States  Infantry  Febru- 
ary 23,  1 866,  and  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  the  same 
day.  He  was  adjutant  of  the  First  Battalion  of  the 
Eleventh  Infantry  from  August  9  to  December  5,  1866, 
when  he  was  appointed  regimental  adjutant.  He  occu- 
pied this  position  until  April  14,  1869,  when,  by  the  con- 
solidation of  regiments,  he  was  transferred  to  the  Six- 
teenth Infantry.  His  services  from  that  time  have  been 
connected  with  the  movements  of  that  regiment,  of 
which  he  was  appointed  adjutant  May  1,  1872,  retaining 
the  office  until  August  1,  1874,  when  he  was  made  regi- 
mental quartermaster.  He  was  promoted  captain  De- 
cember 25,  1874.  He  served  in  various  States  and 
Territories,  and  finally  became  located  at  Fort  Douglas, 
Utah,  which  is  now  his  post  of  duty. 


WHO    SERVED   IX   THE   CIVIL    MAR. 


85 


MAJOR  AND  BREVET-COLONEL  JOSEPH  C.CLARK,  JR.  ' 

(RETIRED  '. 

Major  and  Brevet-Colonel  Joseph  C.  Clark,  Jr. 
(retired),  was  born  at  Mount  Holly,  New  Jersey,  No-  | 
vember  28,  1825.  He  was  graduated  at  the  United 
States  Military  Academy  in  the  Class  of  1848,  and  was 
assigned  as  brevet  second  lieutenant  to  the  Third  United 
States  Artillery  and  promoted  to  second  lieutenant 
Fourth  United  States  Artillery  January  6,  1849;  first 
lieutenant  of  the  same  regiment  December  11,  1850,  and 
captain  May  n,  1861.  He  was  assigned  to  duty  in  the 
Mathematical  Department  United  States  Military  Acad- 
emy August  28.  1849,  and  remained  on  this  duty  until 
August  28,  185  1,  when  relieved  at  his  own  request.  Was 
assigned  to  duty  as  assistant  United  States  Coast  Sur- 
vey,  1S54,  and  was  engaged  in  the  triangulation  of  the 
coast  of  Maine,  New  York  Harbor,  and  Hudson  River; 
in  the  survey  of  the  Florida  Reefs  and  Keys  and 
approaches  to  Charlotte  Harbor,  Florida.  Was  relieved 
from  this  duty  at  his  own  request,  1858.  At  the 
commencement  of  the  Rebellion  was  stationed  at  Camp 
Floyd,  afterwards  named  Camp  Crittenden,  Utah,  and  on 
the  withdrawal  of  the  troops  from  this  post  for  active 
service  in  the  field  was  left  in  command  of  Fort  Bridger. 
After  several  applications  for  active  service  he  was 
relieved  from  duty  at  Fort  Bridger  ami  took  command 
in  January,  1862,  of  Light  Battery  "  E,"  Fourth  United 
States  Artillery,  in  Lander's  division  in  West  Virginia. 
With  this  division,  under  General  Shields  in  the  Shenan- 
doah Valley,  took  active  part  in  the  first  Winchester 
battle  March  23,  1862,  and  Port  Republic  June  8  and  9. 
As  chief  of  artillery  Reno's  division  Ninth  Army  Corps 
took  active  part  in  the  battles  of  second  Bull  Run,  Kettle 
Run,  Chantilly,  and  South  Mountain,  and  at  Antietam 
had  his  horse  killed  under  him,  and  received  four  severe 
wounds  which    completely    disabled    him    from    further 


active  service.  Was  assigned  to  duty  at  the  United 
States  Military  Academy,  West  Point,  as  principal  assist- 
ant in  the  Philosophical  Department  August  29,  1863, 
and  remained  on  this  duty  until  February  21,  1870,  when 
he  was  relieved  under  the  Act  of  Congress  which  prohib- 
ited officers  on  the  retired  list  being  assigned  to  any 
military  duty.  He  was  retired  from  active  service  as 
captain  May  11,  1SO4,  and  as  major  July  28,  1866,  on 
account  of  wounds  received  in  line  of  duty.  Was 
appointed  deputy  governor  of  the  Soldiers'  Home, 
Washington,  1).  C,  1S75,  but  was  relieved  from  this 
duty  May  1,  1877,  on  his  own  application  on  account  of 
disability  resulting  from  wounds  received  at  Antietam. 
He  was  brevctted  major  for  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices in  the  campaign  of  the  Shenandoah  Valley,  Vir- 
ginia, June  9,  1862;  lieutenant-colonel  for  gallant  anil 
meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Antietam,  Maryland, 
September  17,  1862,  and  colonel  for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  during  the  war  March  13,  1865. 


86 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NA  VY  {regular) 


MEDICAL   DIRECTOR   CHRISTOPHER 
BORNE,  M.D.,   U.S.N. 


IAMES  CLE- 


Christopher  James  Cleborne,  M.D.,  was  born  De- 
cember 16,  1  838, and  was  educated  abroad  at  the  Collegiate 
School  of  St.  James  and  the  Brunswick  Academy,  Bristol, 
England.  He  began  the  study  of  medicine  at  Edinburgh 
in  1856,  and  was  graduated  at  the  University  of  Pennsyl- 
vania in  1860,  and  the  same  year  was  made  resident 
physician  of  the  Pennsylvania  Hospital  for  the  unexpired 
term  of  the  late  Dr.  Thomas  B.  Reed, — was  locum  tenens 
of  Drs.  Conrad  and  Lewis  of  that  hospital.  He  was 
elected  a  member  of  the  Academy  of  Natural  Sciences 
July  31,  i860,  and  in  1861  was  appointed  an  attending 
physician  of  the  Moyamensing  House  of  Industry. 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  War,  though  most  of  his 
family  joined  the  Confederacy,  he  entered  the  service  of 
the  United  States  as  assistant  surgeon  May  9,  1 861,  and 
was  attached  to  the  sloop-of-war  "Jamestown,"  North 
Atlantic  Squadron,  from  May,  1S61,  to  January,  1862, 
and  participated  in  the  destruction  of  the  "Alvarado," 
under  batteries  at  Fernandina,  August  5,  1861.  He  was 
ordered,  in  1862,  to  the  sloop-of-war  "  Dale,"  South  At- 
lantic Squadron,  and  was  in  expedition  to  Stono  River, 
engagements  on  South  Edisto,  and  saw  temporary  service 
with  Forty-fifth  Pennsylvania  Regiment  at  Otter  Island, 
South  Carolina,  1862  ;  ordered  to  gun-boat  "  Aroostook," 
West  Gulf  Squadron,  1S63;  in  operations  of  Mobile,  1863. 
He  was  commissioned  surgeon,  with  the  rank  of  lieuten- 
ant-commander, November  24,  1S63  ;  at  naval  rendezvous, 


Philadelphia,  1S64  ;  ordered  to  the  U.S.S.  "  Ticonderoga," 
South  Atlantic  Squadron,  and  coast  of  Brazil,  1864-65  ; 
present  at  both  battles  of  Fort  Fisher,  December,  1864, 
when  the  "  Ticonderoga,"  soon  after  going  into  action, 
lost,  by  the  bursting  of  her  Parrott-gun,  twenty-one  killed 
and  wounded  ;  present  at  the  bombardment  and  capture  of 
Fort  Fisher  January  1  5,  1865.  He  was  ordered,  as  judge- 
advocate  of  the  Naval  Retiring  Board,  to  Philadelphia 
in  [865  ;  attached  to  the  flag-ship  "  Rhode  Island,"  West 
India  Squadron,  in  1866,  and  in  charge  of  U.S.S.  "  Bien- 
ville" during  epidemic  of  yellow  fever  in  1S66;  judge- 
advocate  of  Naval  Retiring  Board,  1S67,  and  was  elected 
a  member  of  the  Conchological  Society  of  Philadelphia 
March  7,  1867;  attached  to  sloop-of-war  "Saratoga," 
1868-69;  flag-ship  "  Powhatan,"  1870;  a  member  of  the 
Naval  Medical  Examining  Board,  Philadelphia,  1870! 
ordered  to  Naval  Station,  League  Island,  1871  ;  elected 
a  member  of  the  Pennsylvania-  Historical  Society  Sep- 
tember 23,  1S72;  attached  to  sloops-of-war  "Juniata," 
"  Plymouth,"  "  Brooklyn,"  and  "  Congress,"  in  European 
Squadron,  1872-74;  ordered  to  navy-yard,  Portsmouth, 
New  Hampshire,  1875-78  ;  delegate  to  American  Medical 
Association  in  1876;  commissioned  medical  inspector, 
with  rank  of  commander,  January  6,  1878;  on  special 
duty  in  Portsmouth  from  November,  1878,  to  April,  1879; 
ordered  to  flag-ship  "  Tennessee,"  as  fleet-surgeon  of  the 
North  Atlantic  Squadron,  1879-8]  ;  attached  to  the  navy- 
yard,  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  1S81-84;  elected  a 
member  of  the  Historical  Society  of  Virginia  in  1883; 
memberof  Medical  Examining  Board,  Philadelphia,  1884 
-87  ;  appointed  one  of  the  vice-presidents  of  the  Inter- 
national Medical  Congress  June  4,  1886;  chairman  of 
the  Medical  Committee  of  the  Constitutional  Centennial 
in  18S7,  and  organized  the  Volunteer  Medical  Corps  of 
the  Centennial  in  September,  1887  ;  commissioned  medi- 
cal director,  with  the  rank  of  captain,  September,  1887; 
elected  president  of  the  Volunteer  Medical  Association  of 
Philadelphia  in  18S7  ;  director  of  Naval  Hospital,  Norfolk, 
Virginia,  January,  (888,  and  director  of  Naval  Hospital, 
Chelsea,  1891. 

Dr.  Cleborne  is  a  grandson  of  the  late  William  Cleborne, 
of  Derinsolla, — representative  of  the  Westmoreland  family 
of  that  name,  a  branch  of  which  was  settled  at  Roman- 
coke,  Virginia,  by  Secretary  William  Claiborne,  early  in 
the  seventeenth  century. 

The  present  station  of  Medical  Director  Cleborne  is  at 
Boston,  where  he  is  in  charge  of  the  Chelsea  Naval  Hos- 
pital, and  is,  ex  officio,  a  trustee  of  the  National  Sailors' 
Home  at  Quincy,  Massachusetts. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


87 


CAPTAIN   AND    ASSISTANT   QUARTERMASTER 
JOHN   LINCOLN  CLEM,  U.S.A. 

Captain  and  Assistant  Quartermaster  John  Lin- 
coln Clem  was  born  in  Newark,  Ohio,  August  13,  185  1. 
He  entered  the  volunteer  service,  at  the  breaking  out  of 
the  Rebellion,  as  a  drummer  in  May,  1861,  but  on 
account  of  his  youth  (not  ten  years  old)  was  not  enlisted, 
although  he  served  as  a  drummer  in  Company  C, 
Twenty-second  Michigan  Infantry  until  he  was  enlisted, 
May  1,  1863.  He  served  in  the  field  in  the  Army  of  the 
West ;  was  promoted  sergeant  of  Company  C,  Twenty- 
second  Michigan  Infantry  at  the  battle  of  Chickamauga, 
and  was  honorably  discharged  from  the  volunteer  service 
September  19,  1864. 

Captain  Clem  is  probably  the  youngest  soldier  on 
record,  and  began  active  service  when  about  eleven 
years  of  age.  Shortly  after  the  death  of  his  mother,  he 
offered  his  services  to  the  Third  Ohio  Regiment  as 
drummer,  but  was  rejected,  being  then  not  ten  years  of 
age.  He  afterwards  offered  himself  to  the  Twenty- 
second  Michigan  Regiment,  but  was  again  rejected.  He 
determined,  however,  to  cast  his  fortunes  with  the 
Twenty-second  Michigan,  and  April,  1862,  found  him 
beating  the  "  long-roll"  before  Shiloh,  where  his  bravery 
was  so  great  that  he  was  mustered  in,  and  was  known  as 
"Johnny  Shiloh."  But  it  was  on  the  23d  of  September, 
1863,  at  the  battle  of  Chickamauga,  that  he  won  the 
name  which  will  live  long  after  he  has  passed  away. 
Here,  though  just  passed  his  twelfth  year,  he  had  laid 
aside  the  drum  for  the  musket,  and,  after  acting  for  a 
while  as  a  marker,  with  a  musket,  the  barrel  of  which 
had  been  cut  down  expressly  for  his  use,  he  took  his 
place  in  the  ranks.  As  the  day  closed  and  the  army 
retired  to  Chattanooga,  his  brigade  was  ordered  to  sur- 
render by  the  enemy,  and  "  Little  Johnny"  himself  was 
covered  by  the  sword  of  a  Confederate  colonel,  but 
quickly  bringing  his  gun  into  position  he  shot  the  Con- 
federate colonel.  His  regiment  was  then  fired  into,  and, 
falling  as  if  shot,  the  juvenile  soldier  laid  close  until 
dark-,  when  he  went  to  Chattanooga  and  joined  his  com- 
mand. For  his  bravery  he  was  made  a  sergeant  by 
General  Rosecrans,  and  attached  to  the  head-quarters  of 


the  Army  of  the  Cumberland,  and  was  presented  with  a 
silver  medal  by  Miss  Kate  Chase,  a  daughter  of  the  chief 
justice.  He  was  afterwards  captured  and  held  prisoner 
for  sixty-three  days,  and  after  his  release  was  made 
orderly  sergeant  by  General  Thomas,  who  had  succeeded 
General  Rosecrans,  and  was  attached  to  his  staff.  At 
the  close  of  the  war  he  went  to  school  and  graduated  at 
the  Newark  High  School.  In  187 1  General  Grant,  in 
recognition  of  his  merits,  appointed  him  second  lieuten- 
ant of  the  Twenty-fourth  U.  S.  Infantry,  and  served  on 
signal  duty  at  Fort  Whipple,  Virginia,  during  the  years 
1872-73;  then  ordered  to  the  Artillery  School  at  Fort 
Monroe,  Virginia,  from  which  he  graduated  in  1875  ;  he 
was  after  this  detailed  as  Professor  of  Military  Science  at 
Galesville  University,  where  he  served  from  June  8,  1879, 
to  May  4,  1882. 

Joining  his  regiment  in  Texas,  he  remained  with  it 
until  appointed  a  captain  and  assistant  quartermaster 
and  ordered  to  Schuylkill  Arsenal,  Philadelphia,  Penn- 
sylvania, May  4,  1882,  where  he  remained  until  trans- 
ferred to  Fort  McHenry  in  1883.  In  1886  he  was 
assigned  to  duty  as  depot  quartermaster  at  Ogden,  L^tah, 
and  in  1888  removed  to  Columbus,  Ohio,  doing  duty  as 
depot  quartermaster  at  Columbus  Barracks,  his  present 
station. 


ss 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


COLONEL   DAVID    RAMSAY   CLENDENIN. 

Colonel  David  Ramsay  Clendenin  was  born  in  Lan- 
caster County,  Pennsylvania,  June  24,  1830,  his  family 
connection  embracing  the  names  of  Colonel  John  Steele 
and  David  Ramsay.  When  but  a  youth,  Colonel  Clen- 
denin  visited  Illinois  and  remained  to  complete  his  edu- 
cation at  Galesburg  Knox  College,  of  which  institution 
he  is  an  alumnus. 

In  the  summer  of  1861  he  raised  a  company  of  volun- 
teers for  the  Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry  (General  Farns- 
worth)  and  at  the  organization  of  the  regiment  at  St. 
Charles,  Illinois,  on  September  18,  1861,  he  was  made 
major  of  the  regiment.  For  the  next  four  years  the 
Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry  was  identified  with  the  Arm)'  of 
tlir  Potomac,  and  the  duties  peculiar  to  cavalry  brought 
them  into  scenes  of  danger  and  distress  and  gave  oppor- 
tunities of  heroism. 

lie  participated  in  the  fatigue  and  exposure  and  fight- 
ing of  the  Peninsula  campaign,  taking  his  share  of 
roughing  it.  At  the  battle  of  Upperville  he  had  two 
horses  shot  under  him.  At  one  time  (at  llaxall's  Land- 
ing), when  alone  with  an  orderly,  inspecting  pickets,  a 
bullet  from  a  rebel  picket  passed  through  his  hat,  the 
orderly  also  receiving  some  bullets  through  his  clothes. 
When  pushing  ahead  of  the  command  with  a  squadron 
of  the  Eighth  Illinois  and  a  squadron  of  the  Sixth 
Pennsylvania,  as  escort  to  the  engineer  officer,  he  cap- 
tured a  supply-train  of  the  enemy,  which  had  with  it 
negro  laborers,  which  he  sent  back  to  our  lines  as  con- 
traband of  war. 

General  Hooker,  in  command  of  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  before  the  battle  of  Gettysburg,  in  the  spring 
of  1863,  when  the  army  was  in  front  of  Fredericksburg, 
ordered  him  to  take  three  days'  rations  and  make  a  raid 
with  his   men   along  the   fords   of  the  James    River  and 


break  up  the  contraband  trade  of  ammunition  and  sup- 
plies. He  was  gone  eleven  days,  and  captured  rebels 
and  trains,  three  times  as  man)-  men  as  under  his  com- 
mand, and  broke  up  the  trade. 

He  was  in  the  three-days'  fight  at  Fredericksburg,  at 
Coal  Harbor,  Kent  Court-House,  Cumberland,  White 
House,  Mechanicsville,  First  and  Second  Malvern  Hill, 
and  other  battles  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac. 

Was  made  lieutenant-colonel  of  his  regiment  Decem- 
ber 5,  1862,  and  brevetted  colonel  of  volunteers  and 
brigadier-general  of  volunteers  for  meritorious  services 
during  the  war. 

Most  of  the  time  after  becoming  lieutenant-colonel  he 
was  in  command  of  his  regiment. 

In  the  summer  of  1864,  when  the  city  of  Washington 
was  threatened  and  so  nearly  captured  by  General  Jubal 
Earl)-,  Colonel  Clendenin  was  with  Major-General  Lew- 
Wallace  in  Maryland,  lighting,  with  the  six  companies  of 
his  regiment,  an  overwhelming  force  of  the  enemy  at 
fearful  odds,  delaying  the  progress  of  the  rebel  army 
until  the  Union  army  under  General  Grant,  at  Richmond, 
could  send  reinforcements  for  the  defence  of  Washing- 
ton. It  is  well  to  remember,  says  the  historian,  that  but 
for  the  gallant  stand  at  Monocacy,  Maryland,  the  arrival 
of  these  troops  would  have  been  too  late. 

In  the  book  "  Story  of  Washington,"  page  154,  we  find 
him  mentioned  as  follows:  "Colonel  Clendenin,  who,  as 
we  have  seen,  had  been  fighting  on  the  extreme  left, 
proved  himself  a  gallant  officer.  Finding  himself  cut  off 
from  the  main  bod)-,  he  threw  himself  into  the  little  vil- 
lage of  LTrbana,  where  he  repeatedly  repulsed  the  assaults 
of  the  enemy,  and  at  last,  by  a  bold  charge,  sabre  in 
hand,  cut  through  the  hostile  ranks,  capturing  the  battle- 
flag  of  the  Seventh  Virginia.  '  As  brave  a  cavalry  soldier 
as  ever  mounted  horse,'  said  his  commander,  in  his 
report  of  the  battle." 

After  the  surrender  of  General  Lee  and  the  cessation 
of  hostilities,  came  the  assassination  of  President  Lin- 
coln. The  Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry,  under  Colonel  Clen- 
denin, was  sent  out  as  one  of  the  search-parties  to  find 
the  assassin  Booth. 

Colonel  Clendenin  was  detailed  on  the  commission  to 
try  the  conspirators  at  Washington  in  1865,  and  was  a 
member  of  that  court. 

He  was  commissioned  major  of  the  United  States 
Cavalry  (Eighth)  on  January  22,  1867.  Lieutenant-col- 
onel of  the  Third  United  States  Cavalry  November  1, 
1882,  and  colonel  of  the  Second  United  States  Cavalry 
October  29,  1888. 

He  has  served  on  the  frontier  almost  unremittingly 
since  1867,  never  having  a  detail  except  to  harder  duty, 
and  never  shirking  the  duty  of  his  regular  work.  He 
was  retired  from  active  service  on  account  of  failing- 
health  April  20,  1 891. 


WHO   SERVED    IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


89 


COLONEL   HENRY   WHITNEY  CLOSSON,   U.S.A. 

Colonel  Henry  Whitney  Closson  (Fourth  Artil- 
lery) was  born  in  Whitingham,  Vermont,  June  6,  1832, 
and  graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  July  1,  1854. 
He  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  in  the  First  Artillery, 
and  his  first  service  was  at  Fort  Yuma,  California,  from 
1854  to  1855.  While  there  he  commanded  the  party 
which  escorted  Lieutenant  Michler  on  the  boundary 
survey  of  1855.  From  Yuma  he  went  to  San  Antonio, 
Texas,  in  1856;  from  there  to  Fort  Clark,  Texas.  The 
same  year  he  took  part  in  the  scout  to  the  head-waters  of 
the  Neuces,  against  the  Lipan  Indians,  April  10  to  20, 
1856,  and  was  engaged  in  the  pursuit  and  surprise  of 
three  parties  of  Lipans  August  20,  1856,  near  the  mouth 
of  the  Pecos  River. 

On  October  31  of  the  same  year  he  was  promoted  to 
first  lieutenant  in  the  First  Artillery,  and  served  the 
remainder  of  that  year  in  garrison  at  Baton  Rouge, 
Louisiana.  In  1857  he  served  against  the  Seminole 
Indians  of  Florida,  and  from  there  went  to  Fort  Adams, 
Rhode  Island,  where  he  remained  until  1859.  The  con- 
clusion of  that  year  saw  him  again  on  the  frontier  .it 
Fort  Clark  and  Fort  Duncan,  Texas,  and  Fort  Taylor, 
Florida,  until  1861.  He  was  offered  a  captaincy  in  the 
Nineteenth  Infantry  May  14,  1861,  which  was  declined, 
and  on  the  same  date  was  promoted  to  be  captain  in  his 
own  regiment.  He  participated  in  the  gallant  defence  of 
Fort  Pickens,  November,  1861,  and  January  and  May, 
[862,  distinguishing  himself  so  much  as  to  be  selected 
for  chief  of  artillery  for  the  district  of  Pensacola,  May 
16  to  December  24,  1862.  From  that  time  to  March  13, 
1863,  he  commanded  his  battery  at  Baton  Rouge.  He 
was  chief  of  artillery  of  General  Grover's  division  of  the 
Nineteenth  Army  Corps  in  the  Teche  campaign,  which 
lasted  from  March  to  August,  1863,  being  engaged  in 
the  following  actions:  Grand  Lake  Landing,  April  13; 
Irish  Bend,  April  14;  Vermilion  Bayou,  April  17,  and 
the  siege  of  Port  Hudson,  Ma}'  24  to  July  8.  He  was 
brevetted  major  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at 
the  capture  of  Port  Hudson.  He  was  appointed  chief 
of  artillery  Nineteenth  Corps  October  4,  1863,  and  served 
in  the  Red  River  campaign,  being  engaged  at  Sabine 
Cross-Roads  April  8,  1864;  Pleasant  Hill  April  9,  and 
Crane  River  Crossing  April  23  ;  was  chief  of  artillery  of 
the  Mobile  Expedition,  August,  1864,  and  participated  in 
the  siege  of  Fort  Gaines  and  Fort  Morgan,  and  for  gal- 
lant and  meritorious  services  at  the  latter  place  was 
brevetted  lieutenant-colonel.  November  1  of  the  same 
year  he  was  transferred  to  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  as 
chief  of  artillery  and  ordnance  of  the  cavalry  corps  to 
December  31  ;  was  inspector  of  the  horse  artillery  bri- 
gade from  January  until  April,  1865.  At  the  disband- 
ment  of  the  armies  he  returned  to  the  command  of  his 


batten-,  at  Winchester,  Virginia,  July,  1865;  served  at 
Fort  McHenry,  Maryland,  July  to  October,  1S65;  Fort 
Schuyler,  New  York  harbor,  to  June,  1866;  Fort  Porter, 
New  York,  to  August,  1866,  and  on  recruiting  service, 
to  November  30,  1867.  Upon  return  to  regimental  duty 
he  was  stationed  at  Fort  Hamilton,  New  York,  until 
November  18,  1872.  From  there  he  went  to  Savannah, 
where  he  remained  until  November  30,  1S75  ;  then 
to  Plattsburg  Barracks,  New  York,  to  October,  1876. 
While  on  duty  here  Captain  Closson  was  ordered  to  the 
Southern  States  on  account  of  anticipated  difficulties 
growing  out  of  the  disputed  Presidential  election  of 
1876.  He  remained  on  this  duty  to  December,  1876. 
In  January,  1877,  he  was  ordered  to  Fort  Barrancas, 
Florida,  having  been  promoted  to  be  major  Fifth  Artil- 
lery November  1,  1876. 

He  remained  four  years  at  Barrancas,  and  went  in 
November,  1881,  to  Fort  Niagara,  where  he  was  stationed 
until  November,  1882.  He  then  moved  to  Fort  Wads- 
worth,  New  York,  where  he  remained  for  six  years,  the 
longest  tour  of  duty  at  one  post.  He  was  made  lieu- 
tenant-colonel Fifth  Artillery  September  14,  1 883,  and 
colonel  Fourth  Artillery  April  25,  1888.  This  trans- 
ferred him  to  Fort  Adams  in  May,  1888. 

The  regiment  moved  south  in  May,  1889,  and  Colonel 
Closson's  head-quarters  have  been  since  then  at  Fort 
McPherson,  Atlanta,  Georgia. 

January  5,  1890,  he  was  a  member  of  the  board  to 
examine  the  workings  of  the  Artillery  School  at  Fort 
Monroe,  Virginia,  and  September  9,  1890,  he  was  de- 
tailed upon  another  most  important  duty  as  member  of 
a  board  to  examine  and  report  upon  the  capabilities  of 
various  sites  for  gun-foundries  and  factories,  whereby  the 
heavy  steel  rifled-guns  can  be  made  to  put  us  upon  an 
equality,  to  say  the  least,  with  other  great  nations  of  the 
world. 


9° 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  JOHN   W.  CLOUS,  U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  John  W.  Clous  (Deputy  Judge- 
Advocate-General)  was  born  in  Germany  June  9,  1837. 
He  entered  the  army  February  2,  1857,  serving  as  private, 
Company  K,  and  in  band,  Ninth  Infantry,  to  November 
5,  i860,  and  as  private  and  corporal,  Company  K,  and 
quartermaster-sergeant,  Sixtli  Infantry,  from  February  9, 
1 861,  to  December  7,  1862.  In  the  fall  of  1861  the  Sixth 
Infantry  was  assigned  to  General  Sykes's  command  of 
regulars  and  became  part  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant  Clous's  "praiseworthy  conduct 
during  the  movement"  of  that  army  "  from  the  Chicka- 
hominy  to  the  James  River  and  his  cool  behavior  at  the 
battle  of  Malvern  Hill  in  the  performance  of  his  duties" 
resulted  in  his  being  recommended  for  appointment  as 
second  lieutenant  in  the  arm)-.  He  was  commissioned 
as  such  by  President  Lincoln  on  November  29,  1862,  and 
assigned  to  the  Sixth  Infantry.  He  was  on  duty  with 
his  regiment  dming  its  entire  service  in  the  field  with  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  participating  in  the  siege  of  York- 
town,  seven  days'  battles  in  June,  1862,  battles  of  Malvern 
Hill,  second  Bull  Run,  Antietam,  Fredericksburg,  Chan- 
cellorsville,  and  Gettysburg.  He  was  brevetted  first  lieu- 
tenant and  captain  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in 
the  battle  of  Gettysburg.  He  was  regimental  quarter- 
master from  February  1,  1864,  to  April,  1S65,  and  regi- 
mental adjutant  from  the  latter  date  to  March  28,  1867. 
He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant,  Sixth  Infantry,  March 
28,  1865. 

After  a  short  term  of  service  at  Savannah,  Georgia, 
and  Hilton  Head,  South  Carolina,  in  1865,  with  his 
regiment,  he  took  station  at  Charleston,  South  Carolina. 
While  at  this  place  Lieutenant  Clous,  in  addition  to  his 
duties  as  regimental  adjutant,  was,  in  March,  1S66,  detailed 


as  adjutant-general  of  the  Department  of  South  Carolina, 
continuing  in  that  capacity  upon  the  consolidation  of  the 
latter  with  the  Department  of  the  Carolinas  and  of  the 
South,  and  subsequently  into  the  Second  Military  Dis- 
trict,— of  all  of  which  Major-General  Daniel  F.  Sickles 
was  the  permanent  commander.  During  the  government 
and  reconstruction  of  the  States  of  North  and  South 
Carolina  by  this  general  officer,  Lieutenant  Clous  ren- 
dered most  valuable  and  efficient  services.  Having  been 
appointed  captain  in  the  Thirty-eighth  Infantry,  he  was, 
in  September,  1867,  at  his  own  request,  relieved  from 
duty  as  adjutant-general. 

In  March,  1868,  Captain  Clous  joined  his  company,  in 
the  Department  of  the  Missouri,  at  once  taking  the  field, 
escorting  the  construction  forces  of  the  Union  Pacific 
Railroad,  E.  D.(now  Kansas  Pacific).  In  October,  1868, 
he  was  detailed  as  an  acting  aide-de-camp  on  the  staff  of 
Major-General  Sheridan  during  the  latter's  winter  cam- 
paign against  the  Indians  of  the  Southwest.  Upon  his 
return,  in  March,  1869,  he  conducted  a  battalion  of  the 
Thirty-eighth  Infantry  from  Fort  Hays,  Kansas,  through 
the  Indian  country  to  Fort  Richardson,  Texas.  Being, 
through  consolidation,  transferred  to  the  Twenty-fourth 
Infantry,  Captain  Clous  served  with  his  company  on  the 
frontier  of  Texas  at  Forts  Griffin,  McKavett,  and  Brown, 
taking  part,  in  1872,  as  acting  engineer-officer  in  General 
Mackenzie's  expedition  across  the  Staked  Plains,  and 
in  the  Indian  engagement  of  the  latter's  command  on 
September  29,  1872,  at  North  Fork  of  the  Red  River, 
Texas. 

For  gallant  conduct  in  that  engagement,  Captain  Clous 
was  specially  mentioned  in  General  Order  No.  99,  Head- 
quarters of  the  Arm)',  A.  G.  O.,  November  19,  1872  ;  at 
Fort  Brown — from  1873-77 — his  company  was  mounted, 
and  performed  scouting  duty  along  the  Rio  Grande 
during  the  border  disturbances. 

He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  at  San  Antonio,  Texas. 
He  was  judge-advocate  in  many  important  trials  during 
his  service  in  Texas,  and  served  as  judge-advocate  of  the 
Department  of  Texas,  with  the  exception  of  a  short  inter- 
val, from  January,  1881,  to  August,  18S4.  In  April,  1886, 
upon  the  recommendation  of  Major-General  Hancock  and 
other  prominent  officers,  as  well  as  of  the  judges  and 
lawyers  of  the  bar  of  which  he  was  a  member,  he  was 
appointed  major  and  judge-advocate.  In  May,  1887,  he 
was  admitted  as  an  attorney  and  counsellor  of  the  Su- 
preme Court  of  the  United  States.  From  May,  1886,  to 
August,  1890,  he  served  in  Washington  as  the  assistant 
to  the  judge-advocate-general.  On  August  28,  1890,  he 
became,  by  assignment  of  the  Secretary  of  War,  professor 
of  law  of  U.  S.  Military  Academy,  West  Point,  New  York, 
where  he  is  now  serving.  On  February  12,  1892,  he  was 
promoted  lieutenant-colonel  and  deputy  judge-advocate- 
general  of  the  United  States  Army, 


ll'/fO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


9i 


MAJOR   EDWIN   M.  COATES,  U.S.A. 

Major  Edwin  M.  Coates  (Nineteenth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  New  York  City  January  29,  1836.  He  was  a 
member  of  Ellsworth  Chicago  Zouaves  in  1S60,  and  en- 
tered the  volunteer  service  as  first  lieutenant  of  the 
Eleventh  New  York  Zouaves,  Colonel  E.  E.  Ellsworth, 
April  20,  1 86 1,  but  the  regiment  was  not  mustered  into 
the  United  States  service  until  it  arrived  in  Washington 
May  7,  1 86 1.  He  was  with  the  regiment  in  the  advance 
of  the  army  on  Alexandria  May  24,  1861,  and  assisted 
in  taking  possession  of  the  Marshall  House  in  that  city, 
at  six  o'clock,  a.m.,  May  24,  with  a  squad  of  the  regi- 
ment, a  few  moments  after  the  shooting  of  Colonel  Ells- 
worth by  Jackson,  the  proprietor  of  the  house.  He 
accompanied  the  remains  of  Colonel  Ellsworth  to  his 
former  home  at  Mechanicsville,  New  York,  where  they 
were  interred. 

Lieutenant  Coates  resigned  his  volunteer  commission 
August  4.  [861,  and  entered  the  regular  service  as  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Second  Dragoons  August  5,  1861.  He 
was  transferred  to  the  Twelfth  Infantry  September  20, 
1S61,  and  joined  his  regiment  at  Fort  Hamilton,  New 
York  harbor,  where  he  served  as  battalion  quartermaster 
until  January,  1863,  when  he  joined  his  regiment  in  the 
field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  at  Falmouth,  Vir- 
ginia, where  he  was  made  adjutant  of  the  first  battalion, 
Twelfth  Infantry,  He  served  in  the  field  with  his  regi- 
ment until  September,  1S64,  when  he  left  the  field  by 
being  disabled  from  the  fall  of  his  horse,  having  partici- 
pated in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness  May,  1864,  and  the 
subsequent  campaign. 

He  was  then  ordered  on  recruiting  duty,  where  he  re- 
mained until  October,  1866,  when  he  joined  his  regiment 
at  Washington,  D.  C.  He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant 
October  24,  1861,  and  was  brevetted  a  captain  August  1, 
1864,  "for  gallant  services  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilder- 
ness, and  during  the  campaign  before  Richmond,  Vir- 
ginia." 

He  was  promoted  captain  April  4,  1865,  and  upon 
the  reorganization  of  the  army,  in  1866,  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  Thirtieth  Infantry.  He  left  with  his  regi- 
ment for  the  plains  in  January,    1867,  and  passed  the 


remainder  of  the  winter  in  camp  on  the  South  Platte 
River,  opposite  Fort  Sedgwick,  Colorado.  He  was 
afterwards  in  camp  along  the  line  of  the  Union  Pacific 
Railroad  during  its  construction,  and  at  Fort  D.  A.  Rus- 
sell and  Fort  Sanders,  Wyoming,  until  1871.  In  the 
mean  time  Captain  Coates  with  his  company  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  Fourth  Infantry  March  23,  1869,  upon  the 
consolidation  of  regiments.  The  station  of  his  regiment 
was  changed  to  Kentucky  in  1871,  and  in  1872  to  Little 
Rock,  Arkansas,  where  he  remained  until  May,  1873, 
when  the  regiment  was  ordered  to  California,  to  take 
part  in  the  Modoc  war  ;  but  upon  arriving  at  Omaha, 
the  necessity  no  longer  existed  for  additional  troops  on 
the  Pacific  coast,  and  Captain  Coates  was  sent  with  his 
company  to  Fort  Bridger.  He  served  subsequently  at 
Forts  Fetterman  and  Robinson,  and  was  in  the  field 
against  hostile  Sioux  Indians  in  the  early  part  of  1876. 
Afterwards  he  was  stationed  at  Fort  Fred  Steele  and 
Fort  Omaha,  and  was  changed  to  Fort  Sherman,  Idaho, 
in  July,  1886.  From  this  post  he  was  sent  to  Boise 
Barracks,  Idaho,  in  1890,  when  he  was  promoted  major 
of  the  Nineteenth  Infantry,  to  date  from  July  14,  and 
ordered  to  the  command  of  Fort  Mackinac,  Michigan, 
his  present  station. 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN  JOHN   NICHOLS  COE,  U.S.A. 

Captain  John  Nichols  Cue  (Twentieth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Portland,  Maine,  July  21,  1836.  He  entered 
the  regular  service  as  private  of  Company  H,  First  Bat- 
talion Eleventh  U.  S.  Infantry,  and  was  subsequently 
appointed  corporal,  sergeant,  and  first  sergeant  of  the 
same  company.  On  the  14th  of  April,  1862,  he  was  made 
quartermaster-sergeant  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry,  which 
he  retained  until  April    1,  1865,  having  been  appointed 


second  lieutenant  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry  March  12. 
1865,  but  not  receiving  the  appointment  until  April.  He 
was  promoted  first  lieutenant  the  same  day  of  his  appoint- 
ment. 

Captain  Coe  served  with  his  regiment  in  the  field  with 
the  Army  of  the  Potomac  from  December,  1862,  to  the 
close  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  and  was  then  stationed 
with  his  regiment  in  Richmond,  Virginia,  from  May,  1865, 
to  January,  1867,  and  then  in  Louisiana  to  April,  1869. 
He  was  transferred  to  the  Twentieth  Infantry  September 
21,  1866,  upon  the  reorganization  of  the  army,  and  was 
promoted  captain  June  19,  1868. 

He  was  stationed  at  various  points  in  the  Indian 
country  (Dakota)  most  of  the  time  from  May,  1869,  to 
December,  1877.  His  regiment  was  then  transferred  to 
Texas,  along  the  Rio  Grande,  from  January,  1878,  to 
November,  iSSi.  He  then  had  two  years'  duty  at  Fort 
Leavenworth,  Kansas,  and  rejoined  his  regiment  at  Fort 
Supply,  Indian  Territory,  where  he  remained  until  May, 
1885,  when  his  regiment  was  ordered  to  Montana,  and 
he  took  station  at  Fort  Assinaboine,  where  he  has  been 
on  duty  to  the  present  time. 

Captain  Coe  was  adjutant  of  the  Second  Battalion  of 
the  Eleventh  Infantry  from  June  18,  1865,  to  October  4, 
1865,  when  he  was  made  quartermaster  of  the  Second 
Battalion,  which  he  retained  until  September  21,  1S66. 
On  the  6th  of  December,  1866,  he  was  appointed  regi- 
mental quartermaster  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry,  and  held 
that  position  until  promoted  captain. 


WHO   SERVED   FN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


93 


COMMANDER  GEORGE  W.  COFFIN,  U.S.N. 

Commander  George  W.  Coffin,  U.S.N.,  is  a  native  of 
Massachusetts,  and  was  appointed  from  that  State.  Me 
entered  the  Naval  Academy  in  September,  i860,  and 
graduated  in  1863,  during  the  height  of  the  Civil  War. 
He  was  promoted  to  ensign  on  (  (ctober  1,  1863.  While 
attached  to  the  steam-sloop  "  Ticonderoga,"  North 
Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  he  was  in  both  attacks 
upon  Fort  Fisher,  and  was  wounded  in  the  right  leg  by 
a  Minie-ball  during  the  land  assault  upon  that  strong- 
hold. After  the  end  of  the  Civil  War  he  served  in  the 
"  Shawmut,"  on  the  coast  of  Brazil.  Commissioned  as 
lieutenant  July  25,  1S66,  and  was  attached  to  the  steam- 
frigate  "  Franklin,"  of  the  European  Squadron,  in 
1867-68.  Was  commissioned  lieutenant-commander 
March  12,  1868.  Upon  his  return  from  the  luiropean 
station  he  performed  a  tour  of  duty  at  the  Naval  Acad- 
emy;  and  was  then,  in  1870-71,  chief  of  staff  of  the 
North  Atlantic  fleet.  He  was  next  attached  to  the  gun- 
nery ship  "  Constellation,"  1871-72,  and  was  then  at  the 
Naval  Academy  again,  1873-74.  Attached  to  the  "  Ply- 
mouth," North  Atlantic  Station,  1874-75  ;  and  the  "  Hart- 
ford," flag-ship  of  the  same  station,  in  1875-77.  Com- 
manded the  steamer  "  Hassler,"  on  the  Coast  Survey,  in 
1877-80.  Promoted  to  commander  in  November,  1878. 
Attached  to  Naval  Observatory,  1880-81.     On  duty  as 


light-house  inspector  from  1 88 1  to  1884,  and  on  ord- 
nance duty  at  the  New  York  Navy- Yard,  1884-86.  In 
command  of  the  "  Alert,"  on  the  Greely  Relief  Expedi- 
tion, in  1884.  Commanded  the  steam-sloop  "  Quinne- 
baug,"  of  the  Mediterranean  Squadron,  1886-87.  Light- 
house inspector  in  1S88-89,  and  appointed  secretary  of 
the  Light-House  Board  in  1889,  which  position  he  holds 
at  present. 


94 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  NAPOLEON  COLLINS,  U.S.N. 

Rear-Admiral  Napoleon  Collins  was  a  native  of 
Pennsylvania,  but  was  appointed  midshipman  from  Iowa 
January  2,  I S34 ;  promoted  to  passed  midshipman  July 
16,  1840;  commissioned  as  lieutenant  November  6,  1S46; 
sloop  "  Decatur,"  Home  Squadron,  1S46-49;  at  Tuspan 
and  Tabasco,  Mexican  War  ;  steamer  "  Michigan,"  on  the 
Lakes,  1850-53  ;  commanding  store-ship  "John  P.  Ken- 
nedy," North  Pacific  Expedition,  1853-54;  steam-frigate 
"Susquehanna,"  East  India  Squadron,  1S54-55  ;  navy- 
yard,  Mare  Island,  California,  1856-57;  sloop  "John 
Adams,"  Pacific  Squadron,  1857-58;  steamer  "Michi- 
gan," on  the  Lakes,  1858-60;  commanding  steamer 
"Anacostia,"  Potomac  Flotilla,  1861;  engagement  at 
Acquia  Creek,  May  31  and  June  1,  1861  ;  commanding 
gun-boat  "  Unadilla,"  South  Atlantic  Blockading  Squad- 
ron, 1861-62  ;  battle  of  Port  Royal,  November  7,  1862; 
various  expeditions  on  the  coasts  of  South  Carolina, 
Georgia,  and  Florida,  1861-62  ;  commissioned  as  com- 
mander July  16,  1S62  ;  commanding  steamer  "  Octoraro," 
West  India  Squadron,  1S62-63  ;  commanding  steam-sloop 


"  Wachusett,"  special  service,  1863-64.  On  the  7th 
October,  1S64,  Commander  Collins,  then  in  the  "  Wa- 
chusett," seized  the  rebel  steamer  "  Florida,"  lying  within 
the  harbor  of  Bahia,  Brazil ;  the  capture  was  effected 
without  loss  of  life.  Commissioned  as  captain  July  25, 
1866;  commanding  steam-sloop  "Sacramento,"  special 
service,  1867;  navy-yard,  Norfolk,  1S69-70;  commis- 
sioned as  commodore  1 871,  and  as  rear-admiral  1874. 
Died  in  1876. 

Commander  Collins's  seizure  of  the  "  Florida"  was 
a  peculiar  episode  of  the  Civil  War, — as  much  so 
as  Wilkes's  seizure  of  the  Southern  commissioners 
on  board  the  "  Trent."  Mr.  Seward  disavowed  the 
act,  and  insisted  upon  the  trial  of  Collins  by  court- 
martial. 

While  negotiations  were  proceeding  in  regard  to  her 
icturn  to  the  friendly  neutral  port  from  which  she  had 
been  taken,  she  was  run  down  by  a  steam-transport,  at 
night,  while  moored  at  Newport  News,  Virginia,  and 
sunk. 

Commodore  Collins  was  not  long  under  technical 
punishment  for  this  affair.  lie  had  the  moral  support  of 
the  service  and  of  the  country  at  large  ;  the  feeling  being 
that  so  dangerous  a  vessel  as  the  "  Florida"  must  be  dis- 
posed of  when  she  could  be  laid  hands  on,  even  at  the 
risk  of  international  complications. 

The  case  has  since  been  often  referred  to  by  writers  on 
such  subjects,  and  it  has  been  said  that  it  might  be 
brought  up  as  a  precedent  in  some  future  complication 
of  a  like  nature.  But  our  government  placed  itself 
rightly-  upon  record  by  the  arraignment  of  Collins,  and 
by  the  express  disavowal  of  his  act. 

The  Brazilian  government — the  party  really  aggrieved 
— was  satisfied  with  the  explanations  and  the  acts  of  our 
own  government,  and  so  the  matter  dropped.  If  the 
vessel  had  been  actually  delivered  in  the  port  of  Bahia, 
it  would  have  been  when  the  civil  war  was  near  its  end, 
and  she  would,  no  doubt,  have  been  held  by  the  Brazilian 
government  until  satisfactory  evidence  was  given  that  she 
would  not  be  used  against  a  friendly  state. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


95 


CAPTAIN   RICHARD   S.    COLLUM,    U.S.M.C. 

Captain  Richard  S.  Collum  was  born  in  Indiana 
and  appointed  from  that  State  to  the  U.  S.  Naval  Acad- 
emy as  acting  midshipman  September  20,  1854.  He 
resigned  after  remaining  there  about  two  years  and  a 
half.  When  the  Civil  War  occurred  he  applied  for  ser- 
vice, and  received  a  commission  as  second  lieutenant  in 
September,  1861.  He  served  in  the  "St.  Lawrence" 
frigate  from  September,  1 86 1,  to  May,  1863,  as  his  previous 
drill  had  rendered  him  an  effective  officer.  During  that 
service  he  was  at  St.  Simon's,  Georgia  ;  Port  Royal,  South 
Carolina;  the  engagement  with  the  Sewell's  Point  Bat- 
tery, and  the  Confederate  ram  "  Merrimac  ;"  the  bom- 
bardment of  Sewell's  Point  and  the  capture  of  Norfolk. 
He  was  afterwards  in  the  East  Gulf  Squadron,  and  in 
three  boat  expeditions  on  the  Florida  coast  and  in  In- 
dian River. 

He  was  commissioned  a  first  lieutenant  on  December 
30,  1862,  and  while  on  leave  of  absence,  in  July,  1863, 
volunteered  his  services  to  Governor  Morton,  of  Indiana, 
during  the  raid  of  the  Confederate  General  Morgan  to 
the  north  of  the  Ohio  River.  His  services  were  ac- 
cepted, and  he  was  placed  in  command  of  a  battalion  of 
provisional  troops.  Lieutenant  Collum  was  after  this 
stationed  at  Cairo  and  Mound  City,  and  attached  to  the 
Mississippi  Squadron  for  a  year.  During  that  period 
he  was  actively  engaged, — especially  in  expeditions  into 
Kentucky  in  pursuit  of  guerillas.  Afterwards  member  of 
a  commission  to  investigate  charges  against  certain  active 
rebel  sympathizers  at  Louisville,  Kentucky;  and  was 
attached  to  the  frigate  "  New  Ironsides"  from  August, 
1864,  to  April,  1865,  during  which  time  that  vessel  bore 
.1  prominent  part  in  the  two  attacks  upon  Fort  Fisher. 
He  served  at  the  Washington  Navy- Yard  next,  being  in 
temporary  command  at  the  barracks  during  the  confine- 
ment of  Paine  and  his  associate  conspirators.  From 
November,  1867,  to  December,  1S68,  he  was  in  command 
of  Marine  Barracks  at  Mound  City,  Illinois.  His  next 
service  was  on  board  the  "  Richmond"  in  the  Mediterra- 
nean Squadron,  from  1869  to  1871,  being  ordered  to  the 
Naval  Academy  upon  his  return  to  the  United  States. 

Commissioned  captain  in  March,  1872,  and  stationed 
at  the  marine  barracks,  Boston,  from  April,  1872,  to 
January,  1875.  During  this  tour  of  duty  Captain  Collum 
commanded  the  force  of  marines  at  the  great  fire  in 
Boston,  in  November,  1872,  and  had  charge  of  the  re- 
moval of  the  treasure  from  the  Sub-Treasury  to  the 
Custom-House,  which  was  speedily  and  successfully 
accomplished,  in  spite  of  the  circumstances,  without  the 
slightest  accident  or  loss. 

After  a  short  term  at  head-quarters,  upon  leaving  the 


Boston  Station,  Captain  Collum  was  made  fleet  marine- 
officer  of  the  Asiatic  Station  and  judge-advocate  of  the 
fleet,  by  special  appointment  of  the  Navy  Department. 
He  was  attached  to  the  flag-ship  "  Tennessee"  from  June, 
1875,  to  Juh-,  1878.  From  August,  1878,  to  November, 
1 88 1,  member  of  the  Board  of  Inspection.  From  1881 
to  1885,  attached  to  the  Marine  Barracks  at  League 
Island. 

In  April,  1885,  Captain  Collum  took  part  in  the  ex- 
pedition to  Panama.  On  the  night  of  the  withdrawal  of 
the  U.  S.  forces  from  the  city  and  the  occupation  of  the 
original  lines,  representations  were  made  to  the  com- 
manding officers  that  the  insurgents  were  much  excited  ; 
that  drunkenness  prevailed  to  an  alarming  extent,  and 
that  a  violation  of  the  armistice  was  in  contemplation. 
At  ten  p.m.  Captain  Collum  was  ordered  to  enter  the  city 
alone,  to  endeavor  to  ascertain  the  truth  of  the  report, 
and  this  most  dangerous  duty  he  successfully  performed. 
Soon  after  he  was  commissioned  captain  and  assistant 
quartermaster,  which  duty  is  performed  in  Philadelphia. 
Captain  Collum  is  the  author  of  "The  History  of  the 
U.  S.  Marine  Corps  ;"  and  the  articles  "  Dai  Nippon  ;" 
"  The  First  Englishman  in  Japan  ;"  "  Notes  on  Duties  in 
Camp  and  Garrison,  Transportation  of  Troops  by  Rail, 
and  Aid  to  Civil  Powers  ;"  and  "  Notes  on  Topography 
of  Isthmus  of  Panama."  He  has  also  lectured  on  the 
"Heathen  Chinee;"  "An  Historical  Sketch  of  Small- 
Arms  ;"  "  The  Story  of  a  Great  Crime," — delivered  before 
the  PTnited  Service  Club;  "The  American  Marines 
during  the  War  of  the  Revolution" — before  the  His- 
torical Society  ;  and  "  The  Aborigines  of  North  America 
and  their  Relation  to  Japan," — before  the  Numismatic 
and  Antiquarian  Society  of  Pennsylvania. 


96 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  CYRUS  B.  COMSTOCK, 

U.S.A. 
Brevet  Major-General  Cyrus  B.  Comstock  was 
born  in  Massachusetts  ;  appointed  to  Military  Academy, 
from  Massachusetts  July  i,  1 85 1,  and  graduated  June, 
(855,  and  on  graduation  was  appointed  brevet  second 
lieutenant  U.  S.  Engineers;  served  as  assistant  engineer 
in  construction  of  Fort  Taylor,  Key  West  Harbor, 
Florida,  1855-56;  in  building  Fort  Carroll,  Patapsco 
River,  Maryland,  1856-59;  promoted  second  lieutenant 
of  Engineers  April  1,  1855.  In  1859  he  was  superin- 
tending engineer  in  construction  of  Fort  Carroll  ;  assist- 
ant professor  of  natural  and  experimental  philosophy 
September  9,  1859,  to  July  27,  1861  ;  July  I,  i860,  was 
promoted  fust  lieutenant  of  Engineers,  and  assistant 
engineer  in  the  construction  of  the  defences  of  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  August,  [861,  to  March,  1862;  assistant  to  chief 
engineer  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  March  to  June, 
1862;  senior  engineer  on  staff  of  General  Sumner;  June- 
July,  1S62,  served  in  Virginia  Peninsula  campaign,  being 
engaged  in  reconnoissance  before  and  at  siege  of  York- 
town;  May  to  August,  1862,  was  senior  engineer  of 
defence  works,  making  reconnoissance,  and  in  various 
engineer  operations  on  the  advance  towards  Richmond 
and  change  of  base  towards  James  River;  served  in 
Maryland  campaign  (  Army  of  the  Potomac)  September  to 
November,  being  engaged  in  the  battle  of  South  Moun- 
tain September  14,  1862;  took  part  in  battle  of  Antietam 
September  17,  1862  ;  was  chief  engineer,  Army  of  the  Po- 
tomac, from  November  21,  1862,  to  March,  1863,  and 
served  in  the  Rappahannock'  campaign,  taking  part  in  the 
battles  of  Fredericksburg  and  Chancellorsville  ;  March  3, 
[863,  he  was  promoted  to  captain  of  Engineers;  served 
in  the  Department  of  Tennessee,  and  engaged  in  the  siege 
of  Vicksburg,  June   to  July,  1863,  for  gallant  and  meri- 


torious services  in  which  battle  he  was  brevetted  major, 
U.  S.  Army;  assistant  inspector-general  of  the  Military 
Division  of  Mississippi  from  November,  1863,  to  March, 
1864;  from  that  time  he  served  as  aide-de-camp  on  the 
staff  of  General  Grant,  with  rank  of  lieutenant-colonel, 
until  July,  1866;  took  part  in  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness 
Ma)'  5  and  6,  1864,  and  for  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices performed  was  brevetted  lieutenant-colonel ;  served 
at  the  battle  of  Spottsylvania  May  12,  1864;  battle  of 
Cold  Harbor  June  3,  1864;  assault  of  Petersburg  June 
16  and  18,  1S64,  and  of  the  Mine  July  3,  1864,  and  the 
assault  and  capture  of  Fort  Harrison  September  29,  1864. 
He  was  chief  engineer  of  expedition  to  Cape  Fear  River, 
North  Carolina,  in  January,  1865,  and  was  engaged  at 
the  assault  and  capture  of  Font  Fisher  June  15,  1865. 
He  was  made  brevet  colonel,  U.  S.  Army,  and  brevet 
brigadier-general,  U.  S.  Volunteers,  for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  performed  at  capture  of  Fort  Fisher; 
was  senior  officer  on  staff  of  General  Canby  in  the  Mobile 
campaign,  taking  part  in  the  siege  of  Spanish  Fort,  March 
2~  to  April  8,  1865,  and  storming  of  Blakely  April  9, 
1865.  He  was  brevetted  brigadier-general,  U.  S.  Army, 
March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in 
the  Mobile  campaign,  and  bncvetted  major-general,  U.  S. 
Volunteers,  March  26,  for  faithful  and  meritorious  services 
during  the  campaign  against  the  city  of  Mobile  and  its 
defences.  December  28,  1865,  was  promoted  to  major 
of  Engineers;  served  as  aide-de-camp,  with  rank  of  colo- 
nel, to  general-in-chief,  at  Washington,  from  July  26  to 
May  3,  1870;  was  superintending  engineer  of  Geodetic 
Survey  of  the  North  and  Northwestern  Lakes,  May  20 
to  Jul)-,  1874;  January,  1874,  to  June,  1877,  and  June, 
187S,  until  completion  in  1882.  In  Jul)-,  [874,  he  was 
sent  to  Europe  to  examine  the  improvement  of  deltas  of 
great  rivers.  Commencing  in  April,  1875,  he  was  for 
two  years  superintending  engineer  to  examine  the  prog- 
ress of  Ead's  jetties  at  the  mouth  of  the  Mississippi  • 
July  17,  1881,  was  made  lieutenant-colonel  of  Engineers. 
General  Comstock,  since  1871,  has  served  as  a  member 
of  the  Engineer  Board,  and  on  Board  on  bridging  the 
channels  between  Lake  Huron  and  Lake  Erie ;  on  im- 
provement of  Buffalo  harbor  ;  improvement  of  mouth 
of  Mississippi  ;  on  Cleveland  Breakwater  ;  of  Board  of 
Engineers  for  Fortifications,  and  River  and  Harbor  Im- 
provements. Since  1  886  he  has  had  charge  of  Fort  at 
Willett's  Point,  commanded  Engineer  Battalion,  in  charge 
of  Engineer  School  of  Application  atWillet's  Point;  was 
superintending  engineer  of  repairs  of  Font  Schuyler  May, 
[886,  to  April,  1N87.  In  1888  he  was  detailed  as  divi- 
sion engineer  for  inspecting  the  engineer  works  in  the 
Southeastern  Tei'ritoiy  of  the  U.  S.  He  was  made  colo- 
nel of  Engineens  April  7,  1888.  General  Comstock  is  a 
member  of  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences,  and  author 
of  "  Report  on  Primary  Triangulation." 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


97 


CAPTAIN  JOHN  CONLINE,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Captain  John  Conline  was  bom  at  Rutland,  Vermont, 
January  i,  1846,  and  entered  the  volunteer  service  at  the 
breaking  out  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  as  a  private  of 
Company  E,  First  Vermont  Infantry,  May  2,  1861,  from 
which  he  was  discharged  August  15,  1861.  On  Septem- 
ber 5,  1 86 1,  he  again  entered  the  service  as  a  private  of 
Company  E,  Fourth  Vermont  Infantry,  and  participated 
in  the  various  operations  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
being  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Big  Bethel,  Virginia,  June 
10,  1 861  ;  siege  of  Yorktown,  Virginia,  from  April  5  to 
May  4,  1862;  action  at  Lee's  Mills,  Virginia;  battle  of 
Williamsburg,  Virginia  ;  action  of  Garnett's  Hill,  or  Gold- 
ing's  Farm,  Virginia ;  battles  of  Savage  Station,  White- 
Oak  Swamp,  Malvern  Hill,  South  Mountain,  Antietam, 
Fredericksburg,  Marye's  Heights,  action  at  Salem  Heights 
and  battle  of  Salem  Church,  and  action  at  Franklin's 
Crossing.  He  was  one  of  twenty  volunteers  who  went 
across  the  Rappahannock  River  in  the  first  boat,  under 
fire,  before  the  bridge  was  completed,  in  the  last  action 
mentioned,  June  5,  1863;  and  subsequently  participated 
in  the  battles  of  Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania,  July  1-3,  and 
Funkstown  Bridge,  Maryland,  July  10,  1863. 

He  accompanied  the  Vermont  troops  sent  in  August, 
1863,  to  preserve  order  in  the  city  of  New  York,  where 
he  was  appointed  a  cadet  at  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy 
by  President  Lincoln,  on  the  recommendation  of  the 
Secretary  of  War,  for  gallant  and  exemplary  conduct  as 
a  private  soldier  in  the  Sixth  Corps,  Army  of  the  Poto- 
mac. 

Graduating  June  15,  1870,  he  was  appointed  a  sec- 
ond lieutenant  of  the  Ninth  Cavalry.  On  returning 
to  duty  from  his  graduating  leave,  he  was  on  frontier 
duty  at  Forts  Stockton,  McKavett,  and  Concho,  Texas, 
to  August  23,  1874,  when  he  was  appointed  engineer- 
officer  of  the  second  column  of  the  Indian  Territory  ex- 
pedition, remaining  as  such  to  November  27,  1874,  and 
on  temporary  duty  at  Head-quarters  Department  of 
Texas  to  February  1,  1875. 

After  serving  in  Texas  and  Colorado  to  April  3,  1877, 
at  Forts  Clark  and  Garland,  and  having  in  the  mean  time 
been  promoted  first  lieutenant  of  the  Ninth  Cavalry,  Jan- 
uary 27,  1876,  he  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  expedition 
to  preserve  order  among  Southern  Utes  at  Parrott  City, 
Colorado,  to  November,  1876,  and  at  Los  Pinos  Agency, 
Uncompagre  Utes,  for  a  similar  purpose  from  April  3  to 
June  16,  1877. 

Lieutenant  Conline  was  then  stationed  at  Fort  Bayard, 
New  Mexico,  to  October  10,  1877,  when  he  was  granted 
a  sick-leave  of  absence  to  August  20,  1S78,  and  was  then 
stationed  successively  at  Fort  Selden,  Ojo  Caliente,  and 
Fort  Union,  New  Mexico,  performing  various  staff  duties 
at  each.  Being  transferred  to  Troop  A,  Ninth  Cavalry, 
'3 


July  2^,,  1879,  he  was  placed  in  command  of  it  at  Fort 
Stanton,  and  was  in  the  field  on  Indian  expeditions  two 
hundred  and  seventy  days  in  one  year.  He  also  com- 
manded A  and  G  Troops  on  scouting  expeditions  during 
part  of  1880,  and,  with  Company  C,  Fifteenth  Infantry 
added  to  his  command,  he  had  charge  of  three  hundred 
and  eighty-four  Indians  at  South  Fork,  New  Mexico,  in 
1 880. 

The  lieutenant  was  in  an  engagement  with  hostile 
Indians  in  Alamo  Canon,  Sacramento  Mountains,  New 
Mexico,  Sunday,  February  2S,  1880;  he  captured  and 
burned  their  camp,  all  equipage  and  provisions,  and 
captured  all  their  stock, — twenty-one  horses  and  mules. 
He  was  also  in  the  engagement  with  Victorio's  band  of 
hostile  Indians,  in  Mimbrillo  Canon,  San  Andreas  Moun- 
tains, on  the  afternoon  of  April  5,  1880,  which  lasted  two 
hours,  the  Indians  being  defeated.  After  the  campaign 
was  ended  he  went  on  sick-leave  of  absence,  May  1,  1881, 
by  authority  of  the  Secretary  of  War,  and  remained  until 
July,  1885,  when  he  rejoined  at  Fort  Robinson,  Nebraska, 
serving  there  to  June  17,  1887. 

He  was  promoted  captain  of  Troop  C  February  11, 
1887,  and,  after  a  three  months'  leave  of  absence,  joined 
his  troop  at  Fort  Robinson,  Nebraska,  from  which  sta- 
tion he  was  changed  to  Fort  Du  Chesne,  June  5,  1888, 
marching  six  hundred  and  fifty-six  miles,  from  which 
post  he  was  retired,  for  disability  in  the  line  of  duty, 
February  25,  1891. 

Captain  Conline  was  recommended  for  the  brevet  of 
major,  for  gallantry  in  action  with  hostile  Indians,  April 
7,  1880,  during  the  Victorio  war.  He  has  also  received 
numerous  letters  and  orders  of  commendation  from  his 
superior  officers  for  ability  and  gallant  conduct  in  en- 
gagements with  hostile  Indians.  The  captain's  present 
residence  is  Detroit,  Michigan. 


98 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN  CASPER  HAUZF.R  CONRAD.   U.S.A. 

Captain  Casper  Hauzer  Conrad  (Fifteenth  Infantry) 
was  born  near  the  city  of  Kingston,  Ulster  County,  New- 
York,  March  30,  [844.  I  le  enlisted  in  the  One  Hundred 
and  Twentieth  New  York  Volunteers  August  18,  1862, 
and  participated  in  all  the  battles  and  marches  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac  from  November,  1862,  up  to  the 
battle  of  Gettysburg.  He  was  slightly  disabled  at  the 
battle  of  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  and  while  on  the 
march  to  Gettysburg  was  sun-struck  and  sent  to  Fair- 
fax Seminar)'  Hospital;  there  he  was  found  unlit  for 
field-service  and  was  transferred  to  the  Veteran  Re- 
serve Corps.  He  was  nearly  two  years  recovering  from 
disability. 

When,  during  the  battle  of  Chancellorsville,  "  a  cor- 
poral of  his  regiment  was  severely  wounded  and  would 
have  been  left  on  the  field,  he  comprehended  the  situation, 
ami,  amid  a  storm  of  bullets,  caught  a  riderless  horse, 
threw  the  wounded  man  over  the  saddle,  and  succeeded 
in  carrying  him  beyond  range  of  the  enemy."  In  April, 
1S64,  he  was  detailed  as  clerk  on  duty  at  the  head- 
quarters of  the  district  department  of  Washington,  in 
connection  with  the  provost-marshal's  office.     In  June, 


1S65,  he  was  detailed  for  duty  at  the  office  of  the  Fxec- 
utive  Mansion,  and  while  there  was  discharged  June  19, 
iS65,and  appointed  executive  clerk  to  President  John- 
son, remaining  in  that  position  until  April  13,  1867,  when 
he  was  commissioned  first  lieutenant  in  the  Thirty-fifth 
L".  S.  Infantry.  He  reported  for  duty  with  Company  I, 
fuly  [867,  and  commanded  the  company  till  April,  1869. 
He  was  then  stationed  at  different  posts  in  Texas. 

At  the  consolidation  of  the  Thirty-fifth  and  Fifteenth 
Regiments  he  became  first  lieutenant  of  the  latter  regi- 
ment, and  marched  with  it  to  New  Mexico,  arriving 
September,  iS'hj.  He  was  stationed  at  Fort  Stanton 
in  command  of  company,  and  also  as  acting  assistant 
quartermaster  and  acting  commissary  sergeant  till  Feb- 
ruary, 1871,  when  he  was  ordered  on  recruiting  service; 
then  stationed  at  Dayton,  Marietta,  Ohio,  and  Newport 
Barracks,  Kentucky,  where  he  remained  as  depot  quar- 
termaster, acting  commissar\-  sergeant  and  adjutant  till 
April,  1873,  when  he  was  ordered  to  his  regiment.  From 
the  time  of  rejoining  until  he  received  his  captaincy  in 
January,  1875,  he  was  on  duty  as  acting  assistant  quar- 
termaster and  acting  commissary  sergeant  at  different 
posts  in  New  Mexico,  lie  was  promoted  to  Company 
C,  and  stationed  with  it  at  different  posts  in  New 
Mexico  until  the  regiment  was  ordered  to  Colorado,  at 
which  time  he  was  absent  on  sick-leave. 

While  in  command  of  Company  C  at  Mescularo  Indian 
Agency,  New  Mexico,  in  December,  1  SSo,  the  regimental 
commander  issued  General  ( )rder,  No.  13,  complimenting 
Captain  Conrad  and  his  command  for  gallant  and  sol- 
dierly conduct  in  an  engagement  with  hostile  Indians 
December  2,  I  880. 

In  November,  1882,  he  was  ordered  to  Fort  Randall, 
South  Dakota,  where  he  remained  for  nearly  nine  years, 
having  been  stationed  with  his  company  for  one  month 
in  1887  at  Fort  Sully,  guarding  the  post  during  inter- 
change of  regiments.  Captain  Conrad  commanded  Fort 
Randall  at  different  times,  ranging  from  a  month  to  nine 
months  at  a  time,  and  was  sent  also  at  different  times  as 
special  inspector  of  Indian  agencies  and  distribution  of 
annuity  goods.  He  left  Fort  Randall  for  Fort  Sheridan, 
Illinois,  in  May,  1891. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


99 


CAPTAIN  AUGUSTUS   P.  COOKE,   U.S.N. 

Captain  Augustus  P.  Cooke  was  born  in  Coopers- 
town,  New  York,  February  10,  1836;  appointed  to 
the  Naval  Academy  in  1852,  and  graduated  in  1856. 
During  his  first  sea-service,  in  the  Home  Squadron,  he 
participated  in  the  capture  of  Walker,  the  filibuster,  at 
Greytown,  Nicaragua.  In  1859  he  received  his  warrant 
as  passed  midshipman,  and  made  a  cruise  on  the  coast 
of  Africa,  in  the  "San  Jacinto,"  assisting  in  the  capture 
oi  several  slavers.  He  was  commissioned  lieutenant  in 
i860.  When  the  Rebellion  occurred,  the  ship,  then  under 
the  command  of  Captain  Wilkes,  returned  to  the  United 
States,  capturing,  on  the  way,  the  rebel  commissioners, 
Mason  and  Slidell. 

In  January,  1862,  as  executive-officer  of  the  "  Pinola," 
captured  the  blockade-runner  "  Cora,"  and  then  the 
"  Pinola"  proceeded  to  join  Farragut's  squadron.  Lieu- 
tenant Cooke  was  several  times  under  fire  in  the  "  Pinola" 
while  that  vessel  was  assisting  in  breaking  the  chain  bar- 
riers which  obstructed  the  Mississippi,  and  was  present 
at  the  bombardment  and  passage  of  Forts  Jackson  and 
St.  Philip,  the  destruction  of  the  rebel  flotilla,  and  the 
capture  of  New  Orleans.  He  was  also  present  at  the 
first  bombardment  of  Vicksburg;  the  passage  of  the 
batteries  there,  and  the  engagement  with  the  rebel  ram 
"  Arkansas." 

In  August,  1862,  he  was  made  lieutenant-commander, 
and  ordered  to  command  a  vessel  in  Buchanan's  flotilla, 
to  operate,  in  conjunction  with  the  army,  in  the  Bayou 
Teche.  In  January,  1863,  he  went  up  the  Teche,  sup- 
porting General  Weitzel's  brigade,  and  assisted  in  the 
destruction  of  the  enemy's  gun-boat  "  Cotton."  Here 
Lieutenant-Commander  Buchanan  was  killed,  and  the 
command  of  the  flotilla  devolved  upon  Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Cooke. 

During  the  Red  River  expedition,  in  1863,  he  crossed 
troops  over  Berwick  Bay  and  transported  General  Gra- 
ver's division  through  Grand  Lake  and  landed  it  at 
Indian  Bend,  under  fire,  without  accident.  Next  morn- 
ing, at  daylight,  the  flotilla  under  Cooke  was  attacked  by 
the  "  Queen  of  the  West"  and  another  gun-boat  armed 
with  rifled  cannon,  and  with  sharp-shooters  behind  cot- 
ton-bales. Cooke  very  promptly  went  to  meet  them,  and 
his  shells  soon  set  fire  to  the  cotton-bales  of  the  "  Queen 
of  the  West,"  which  was  soon  in  flames,  with  her  people- 
leaping  overboard  to  escape  death  from  fire.  Her  con- 
sort, seeing  this,  turned,  and,  having  superior  speed  and 
lighter  draft  than  Cooke's  vessels,  escaped.  The  officers 
and  ninety  men  of  the  "Queen  of  the  West"  were 
picked  up.  About  twenty  were  lost.  There  were  no 
casualties  in  the  flotilla. 

His  next  operation  was  the  capture  of  Butte  a  la  Rose, 
on  the  Atchafalaya,  driving  off  the  supporting  gun-boat, 
and  taking  the  garrison,  with  a  large  quantity  of  stores 


and  ammunition,  clearing  the  Atchafalaya  from  the  Gulf 
to  the  Red  River  ;  and  by  this  route  he  proceeded  to 
join  Admiral  Farragut,  then  at  the  mouth  of  Red  River. 
General  Banks  made  special  acknowledgment  to  Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Cooke  for  his  success  in  these  opera- 
tions. 

His  next  service  was  in  the  Red  River,  with  Porter's 
il.  el  ;  followed,  in  the  winter  of  1863-64,  by  blockading 
Matagorda  Bay  and  the  coast  of  Texas. 

In  July,  1S64,  he  was  detached  from  duty  in  the  Gulf, 
and  ordered  to  the  Naval  Academy  ;  serving  in  the  prac- 
tice ships  "  Marion"  and  "Savannah."  In  May,  1867,  he 
was  ordered  as  navigator  of  the  steam-frigate  "  Frank- 
lin," Captain  Pennock,  which  went  to  Europe  as  Admiral 
Farragut's  flag-ship.  This  was  a  remarkable  and  inter- 
esting cruise,  from  the  attentions  shown  the  admiral  in 
every  country  he  visited,  especially  in  Russia  and  Sweden. 
In  October,  1S68,  he  was  detached  from  the  "  Franklin," 
and  ordered  as  executive-officer  of  the  "  Ticonderoga," 
on  the  same  station.  Upon  his  return  home  he  was,  in 
1869,  appointed  head  of  the  department  of  ordnance  at 
the  Naval  Academy,  and  published  a  text-book  on  gun- 
nery, long  used  by  the  cadets. 

Lieutenant-Commander  Cooke  was  commissioned  com- 
mander in  1870.  Served  at  the  Torpedo  Station  and 
in  command  of  torpedo-boat  "  Intrepid,"  and  afterwards 
the  "  Alarm."  Later  he  commanded  the  steamer  "  Swa- 
tara."  He  was  made  captain  in  1881,  while  stationed  at 
Mare  Island,  California,  and  commanded  the  "  Lacka- 
wanna," on  the  Pacific  Station,  in  1884-85.  He  next 
served  at  the  navy-yard,  Brooklyn,  in  command  of  the 
"  Vermont,"  and  afterwards  as  captain  of  the  yard.  In 
188S  he  took  command  of  the  "  Franklin,"  at  Norfolk. 
In  1890  he  was  relieved  and  ordered  to  New  York  as 
President  of  the  Board  of  Inspection  of  Merchant 
Vessels. 


L0F& 


1 00 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  {regular) 


COMMANDER  PHILIP   H.  COOPER.  U.S.N. 

Commander  Philip  II.  Cooper  is  a  native  of  New 
York,  and  was  appointed  to  the  Naval  Academy  from 
that  State  in  September,  i860.  The  exigencies  of  the 
service  at  that  period  caused  him  to  be  sent  forth 
from  the  Academy  with  his  class,  and  with  the  rank  of 
ensign,   May  28,   1863.     He   saw  war  service    at    once, 


being  attached  to  the  steam-sloop  "  Richmond,"  of  the 
West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron,  up  to  1865.  He  then 
served  under  the  successive  commands  of  Admirals 
Farragut  and  Thatcher,  and  participated  in  all  the  opera- 
tions connected  with  the  battle  of  Mobile  Bay,  August  5, 
1S64;  the  reduction  of  the  forts  at  the  entrance,  and, 
later,  the  defences  of  the  city  of  Mobile. 

He  was  promoted  to  master  November,  1865  ;  made 
a  cruise  in  the  "  Powhatan,"  South  Pacific  Squadron, 
1865-67;  during  the  cruise  was  commissioned  as  lieu- 
tenant November  10,  1866;  served  at  the  Naval  Academy 
1867-69  ;  commissioned  as  lieutenant-commander  March 
12,  1 868;  made  a  special  cruise  in  the  frigate  "  Sabine" 
in  1869;  served  in  the  T.  and  N.  surveying  expedition  in 
1S70-71  ;  was  then  again  stationed  at  the  Naval  Academy 
from  1872  to  1874;  ordered  to  the  Torpedo  Station 
during  1875,  ar,d  was  then  stationed  at  the  Experimental 
Batteryat  Annapolis  through  1876.  During  1877-79116 
was  on  duty  at  the  Coast  Survey  Office.  He  was  pro- 
moted to  commander  November,  1879,  and  was  upon 
special  navigation  duty  up  to  1 SS t . 

Since  then  Commander  Cooper's  service  has  been  in 
the  regular  order  of  detail  by  the  Navy  Department, 
including  two  periods  of  command  of  a  vessel  on  the 
Asiatic  Station. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


101 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  HENRY  CLARK  CORBIN, 
U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Henry  Clark  Cokbin  (Adju- 
tant-General's Department)  was  born  September  15, 
1842,  in  Monroe  Township,  Clermont  County,  Ohio. 
1 1  is  father's  name  was  Shadrach  Corbin,  and  his  mother's 
Mary  Ann.  His  father  was  of  English  descent.  His 
parents  were  born  in  Ohio,  and  grandparents  and  great- 
grandparents  were  born  in  the  State  of  Virginia,  where 
man_\-  of  the  descendants  yet  reside.  He  attended  the 
common  schools  of  the  neighborhood  until  fourteen  years 
of  age,  when  he  entered  Parker's  Academy,  situated  in 
the  southern  part  of  the  count}-  of  his  birth.  In  i860 
young  Corbin  taught  district  school  near  Olive  Branch, 
Ohio,  and  the  following  year  at  Newtown,  Hamilton 
County,  Ohio.  In  the  mean  time  he  studied  law  under  the 
direction  of  Hon.  Philip  B.  Swing,  of  Batavia.  In  response 
to  President  Lincoln's  second  call  for  volunteers,  he  entered 
the  service  in  the  Eighty-third  Ohio  Infantry.  In  July, 
1S62,  he  was  transferred  to  the  Seventy-ninth  Ohio  as 
a  second  lieutenant,  and  went  with  the  regiment  on  its 
march  and  campaigns  through  Kentucky,  serving  with  it 
until  the  13th  of  November,  1803,  mi  which  day  he  re- 
signed, to  enable  him  to  accept  the  appointment  oi  major 
in  the  Fourteenth  U.  S.  Colored  Infantry,  which  regiment 
he  joined  at  Gallatin,  Tennessee,  the  following  day,  and 
assisted  in  its  organization.  On  the  4th  of  March,  1864, 
he  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  same  regiment, 
and  on  the  23d  of  September  was  raised  to  the  rank  of 
colonel.  Six  months  later  he  was  brcvetted  brigadier- 
general.  Colonel  Corbin  participated  with  the  regiment 
in  all  its  marches,  campaigns,  and  engagements,  and  was 
engaged  in  the  battles  of  Pulaski,  Decatur,  and  Nashville. 
He  was  made  major  by  brevet  for  gallant  and  meritorious 
services  in  action  at  Decatur,  Alabama,  and  lieutenant- 
colonel  by  brevet  for  similar  services  in  the  battle  ol 
Nashville,  Tennessee.  He  was  the  first  man  in  the  State 
of  Ohio  to  receive  and  accept  a  field-officer's  position  in 
a  colored  regiment.  He  was  mustered  out  ot  the  volun- 
teer service  March  26,  1866,  and  was  appointed  a  second 
lieutenant  in  the  Seventeenth  U.  S.  Infantry,  which  regi- 
ment he  joined  at  Fort  Gratiot,  Michigan,  while  the 
Fenian  troubles  were  being  settled.  In  September  of  the 
same  year  he  went  to  Independence,  Missouri,  and  par- 
ticipated in  settling  the  troubles  incident  to  enforcing  the 
registration  law  in  that  State.  After  this  he  was  ordered 
to  Texas.  In  the  mean  time  he  had  been  appointed  and 
confirmed  as  a  captain  of  the  Thirty-eighth  Infantry, 
about  to  be  organized  at  Jefferson  Barracks,  Missouri, 
to  which  station  he  immediately  repaired,  and  until  May 
of  1867  he  was  engaged  in  its  organization.  The  latter 
part  of  May  he  joined  his  company  at  Fort  Hays,  Kan- 
sas. The  command  was  there  subjected  to  the  cholera 
scourge,   Colonel  Corbin  losing  twenty  per  cent,  of  his 


company  by  the  malady.  During  all  the  summer  of  1867 
he  was  engaged  in  guarding  the  overland  stage,  earning 
the  United  States  mail,  from  attacks  of  hostile  Indians. 
Alter  the  Indian  troubles  in  the  Smoky  Hill  country  were 
settled,  he  went,  in  command  of  a  detachment  of  his  regi- 
ment, across  the  plain  over  the  old  Santa  Fe  trail,  and 
took  station  at  Fort  Craig,  New  Mexico,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  scouting,  and  protecting  the  citizens  from  a 
roving  band  of  hostile  Apaches.  In  the  spring  of  1868 
he  marched  with  his  company  to  Fort  Bayard,  New 
Mexico,  and  there  engaged  in  like  service  until  October, 
1869,  when  he  was  given  command  of  his  regiment  and 
ordered  to  march  to  Fort  Davis,  Texas,  where  it  was 
consolidated  with  the  Forty-first  Infantry,  and  thereafter 
was  known  as  the  Twenty-fourth  U.  S.  Infantry.  He 
then  served  at  several  posts  in  that  State,  and  commanded 
Ringgold  Barracks  until  the  autumn  of  1876,  when  he  was 
detailed  on  recruiting  service,  and  ordered  to  Columbus 
Barracks,  Ohio.  On  the  2d  of  March,  1877,011  invitation 
of  President-elect  Hayes,  he  accompanied  him  to  Wash- 
ington. After  his  inauguration  he  was  detailed  for  duty  at 
the  Executive  Mansion.  In  August  of  that  year  he  was 
appointed  secretary  of  what  was  known  as  the  Sitting  Bull 
Commission,  which  was  appointed  to  treat  with  the  hostile 
Sioux  Indians,  then  refugees  in  the  British  Dominion.  Re- 
turning, he  resumed  duty  in  the  city  of  Washington,  where 
he  remained  until  his  appointment  as  assistant  adjutant- 
general  on  the  1 6th  of  June,  1880.  September,  i88i,was 
ordered  to  the  Department  of  the  South,  and  in  Septem- 
ber, 1883,  he  was  transferred  to  the  Division  of  the  Mis- 
souri, where  he  remained  to  1891 ,  and  then  changed  to  the 
Department  of  Arizona.  During  the  celebration  at  York- 
town  Colonel  Corbin  was  made  secretary  of  the  Joint  Con- 
gressional Committee,  and  by  that  committee  made  master 
of  ceremonies.  He  was  with  General  Garfield  when  he 
was  assassinated,  and  was  present  at  his  death. 


102 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


COMMANDER  CHARLES  STANHOPE  COTTON,  U.S.N. 

Commander  Cotton  was  born  at  Milwaukee,  Wiscon- 
sin, February  15,  1S43,  and  appointed  acting  midship- 
man, at  the  Naval  Academy,  from  that  State,  September, 
1858.  The  crisis  of  1 86 1  advanced  the  older  midship- 
men very  rapidly,  and  in  May  of  that  year  Commander 
Cotton  was  ordered  to  the  frigate  "St.  Lawrence,"  which 
captured  the  privateer  "  Petrel"  a  few  days  afterwards, 
and  he  was  sent  to  Philadelphia  on  duty  in  connection 
with  the  trial  of  the  prisoners  captured  on  that  occasion. 
Then  he  served  on  board  the  frigate  "Minnesota,"  flag- 
ship, and,  as  a  midshipman,  commanded  the  quarter- 
deck battery,  comprising  eight  VI II  inch  guns  during 
the  Monitor-Merrimac  action. 

Commander  Cotton  was  promoted  to  ensign  November 
1  1 ,  1N62,  and  was  attached  to  the  steam -sloop  "Iroquois," 
off  Wilmington,  North  Carolina,  and  to  the  steam-sloop 
"Oneida,"  of  the  West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron,  with  a 
few  weeks'  service  on  the  "  I  lartford"  and  "  Kineo,"  up  to 
August,  1865.  He  was  promoted  lieutenant  February 
22,  1864,  six  years  after  his  appointment  as  acting  mid- 
shipman. 

He  served  on  board  the  "Oneida"  during  the  bat- 
tle of  Mobile  Bay,  and  the  subsequent  operations,  up 
to  the  surrender  of  Fort  Morgan.  From  November, 
1S65,  to  May,  [869,  he  was  attached  to  the  steam-sloop 
"Shenandoah"  during  a  most  interesting  cruise  which 
embraced  South  America,  Africa,  India,  and  China.  For 
eight  months  of  this  cruise  he  was  navigator  as  well 
as  watch-officer,  lie  was  promoted  to  lieutenant-com- 
mander July,  1866,  was  on  duty  at  the  Naval  Academy 
and  at  the  Kittery  Navy- Yard  up  to  1S71.  In  April  of 
that  year  he  joined  the  frigate  "Tennessee,"  which  car- 
ried out  the  San  Domingo  commissioners,  whose  object 
was  to  examine  into  and  report  upon  the  contemplated 


project  of  securing  the  use  of  Samana  Bay  for  a  coaling 
station  for  the  United  States  Navy.  For  a  period  after 
this  service  he  was  attached  to  the  "Ticonderoga"  as 
executive-officer,  on  the  Brazil  Station.  Afterwards  on 
duty  at  Kittery  Navy-Yard,  and  under  torpedo  instruc- 
tion at  Newport,  up  to  September,  1S76.  He  was  then 
stationed  at  Norfolk,  Virginia,  as  the  executive-officer  of 
the  "Worcester,"  and  from  October,  1876,  to  July,  1880, 
was  attached  to  the  New  York  Navy- Yard. 

Promoted  commander  April  25,  1877,  commanding 
" Monocacy,"  Asiatic  Station,  from  September,  18S0,  to 
September,  1  S S 3 ,  except  during  June  and  July,  I SS I , 
when  he  commanded  the  "Alert"  on  the  same  station. 
The  "Monocacy"  made  several  interesting  visits  to 
Corea,  skirting  the  whole  coast  and  entering  several 
ports  for  the  purpose  of  showing  our  flag  and  cultiva- 
ting cordial  relations.  At  one  time  the  "  Monocacy" 
was  (summer  of  1 882)  the  only  foreign  ship-of-war  present 
in  Corean  waters,  during  a  crisis  in  the  strained  relations 
between  Corea,  Japan,  and  China.  Her  commander 
managed  to  maintain  cordial  relations  and  intercourse 
with  the  representatives  of  all  three  countries,  and,  as  a 
mark'  of  confidence  and  of  esteem  for  the  United  States, 
he  was  furnished  with  a  copy  of  the  treat}-  between  the 
three  powers  within  an  hour  of  its  receipt  from  Seoul 
by  the  representative  of  one  of  them. 

In  the  spring  of  1883  Commander  Cotton  conveyed 
to  Corea  our  minister,  Mr.  L.  II.  Foote,  and  the  mem- 
bers of  the  legation,  and  accompanied  them  to  Seoul, 
the  capital,  where  ratifications  of  the  treaty  between 
Corea1  and  the  United  States  were  formally  exchanged, 
and  the  foreign  delegation  was  received  in  state  by  the 
king.  This  was  the  first  occasion  upon  which  foreign- 
ers were  presented  to  or  received  by  his  Majesty.  The 
party  were  also  entertained  at  a  state  dinner  by  the 
Minister  of  Foreign  Affairs, — the  first  ever  given  by  the 
Coreans  in  foreign  style,  with  imported  china,  glass,  and 
wines,  and  with  the  use  of  table-cloth,  napkins,  knives 
and  folks,  and  so  forth.  These  events  will  always  be 
remembered  as  marking  an  important  era  in  the  inter- 
course with  that  remote  country.  The  "Monocacy"  was 
the  first  ship  to  salute  the  national  flag  of  Corea,  adopted 
prior  to  the  ratification  of  the  treat)-.  In  the  summer  of 
1883  Commander  Cotton  conveyed  from  Corea  to  Japan, 
in  route  to  the  United  States,  the  first  embassy  accredited 
by  Corea  to  a  foreign  power  other  than  Asiatic. 

These  statements  are  chiefly  of  interest  as  marking 
the  origin  of  a  new  era  for  the  "  Hermit  Kingdom,"  and 
her  emergence  from  the  shell  of  seclusion  and  isolation, 
and  entrance  into  the  great  brotherhood  of  nations. 
Commander  Cotton  has  since  been  inspector  of  ordnance, 
light-house  inspector ;  and  is  at  present  in  command  oi 
the  U.  S.  S.  "Mohican,"  Pacific  Station.  Commanded 
five  vessels  in  the  Bering  Sea,  summer  of  1891. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


103 


CAPTAIN   DAVID  J.   CRAIGIE,   U.S.A. 

Captain  David  J.  Craigie  (Twelfth  Infantry)  was 
born  at  Broomieside,  Fifeshire,  Scotland,  December  6, 
1840.  Entered  volunteer  service  from  Oskaloosa,  Ma- 
haska County,  Iowa,  as  first  lieutenant  Company  II, 
Eighth  Iowa  Infantry,  September  12,  186 1.  Honorably 
mustered  out  volunteer  regiment  and  appointed  captain 
and  assistant  adjutant-general  July,  [864.  Served  in  the 
field,  etc.,  on  the  staff  of  Generals  Curtis,  Davies,  Mit- 
chell, and  others  until  close  of  war  of  the  Rebellion;  was 
honorably  mustered  out  of  service  September,  1S65. 

Volunteer  service :  Participated  in  the  Springfield, 
Missouri,  campaign,  fall  of  1861,  under  Generals  McKin- 
stry  and  Steele:  thence  to  Pittsburgh  Landing,  Tennes- 
see River,  March,  1862;  with  regiment  battle  of  Shiloh, 
Tennessee,  6th  and  7th  of  April,  1S62,  commanding  com- 
pany ;  severely  wounded,  captured  by  enemy.  Lay  on 
battle  field  until  evening  of  the  7th  April  ;  rejoined  regi- 
ment August  same  year  near  Corinth,  Mississippi;  was 
appointed  aide-de-camp  on  the  staff  of  Brigadier-General 
Thomas  A.  Davies,  commanding  second  division  Army 
of  the  Tennessee.  Participated  in  the  campaign  battles 
and  skirmishes  at  and  near  Corinth  and  Iuka,  Missis- 
sippi, fall  of  1862,  and  in  pursuit  of  enemy  after  battle  of 
Corinth,  3d  and  4th  of  October,  1S62.  Thence  to  Col- 
umbus, Kentucky,  and  Rolla,  Missouri,  on  staff-duty 
until  January,  1864,  and  March,  1S65  ;  serving  at  Fort 
Leavenworth,  Kansas,  at  the  close  of  the  war  and  there 
mustered  out. 

Commissioned  second  lieutenant  Twelfth  Infantry  U.  S. 
Army  May,  1866.  Appointed  adjutant  first  battalion 
ami  regimental  adjutant  September  ami  December,  same 
year.  Served  in  Washington,  D.  C,  with  regiment  until 
April,  1  869,  a  portion  of  the  time  as  assistant  to  Adjutant- 
General  Garrison,  of  Washington;  thence  to  Pacific  coast 
with  regiment,  serving  on  that  coast  at  several  stations  in 
California,  Nevada,  and  Arizona  until  June,  1879,  when 
ordered  to  Washington,  D.  C. ;  assistant  to  Colonel  R.  N. 
Scott  in  preparation  of  Rebellion  records  of  1861-65, 
until  March,  1 88 1  ;  rejoined  company  in  Arizona  April, 
1 88 1.  Thence  to  Plattsburg  and  Madison  Barracks, 
New  York,  till  1887,  when  regiment  moved  to  Dakota 
Station,  Fort  Yates,  North  Dakota.  Commanded  com- 
pany on  Sitting  Bull  Sioux  campaign  winter  of  1890-91  ; 
ordered  to  Fort  Leavenworth  with  company  March,  1891. 

Promotion  in  regular  army:  First  lieutenant,  October, 
1867;  captain,  December  16,  18S0. 

Brevet  rank  :  First  lieutenant  II.  S.  Army  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Shiloh,  Tennes- 
see, 6th  and  7th  April,  1862.  Captain  for  gallant  and 
meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Iuka,  Mississippi, 
September,  1862. 

Honorable  mention :  In  records  of  the  Rebellion   in 


reports  on  battle  of  Shiloh,  Tennessee,  Volume  X.,  bat- 
tles ol  Iuka  and  Corinth,  and  in  field- orders  of  division 
department  and  battalion  commander,  Sitting  Pull  Sioux 
campaign  North  and  South  Dakota,  winter  of  1890-91, 
Port  Yates  battalion. 

Staff-service  in  volunteers:  Aide-de-camp  from  Sep- 
tember, 1S62,  to  Jul)T,  1S64  ;  assistant  adjutant- general 
July,   [864,  to  September,  1865. 

Staff  appointments  and  staff  services,  etc.,  in  the  LT.  S. 
Army:  Adjutant  First  Battalion  and  regimental  adjutant 
September  and  December  1,  1866,  to  November,  1869; 
regimental  quartermaster  March  1,  1 871,  to  January  31, 
1876;  depot  quartermaster  and  commanding  Yuma 
quartermaster  depot,  Arizona,  June,  1870,  to  August, 
1 87 1 ,  and  from  November,  1S7S,  to  April,  1879;  com- 
manding post,  Fort  Ilalleck,  Nevada,  June  to  October, 
1877  ;  commanding  company  and  post,  Whipple  Banks, 
Arizona,  April,  1879,  to  June,  1879;  thence  to  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  War  Department  Rebellion  records,  to  April, 
1 88 1 ;  rejoined  company  same  month.  Fort  Grant,  Arizona. 

Patties,  skirmishes,  etc.,  in  which  engaged  :  Skirmish 
crossing  Osage  River,  Missouri,  October,  i86i,and  near 
Springfield,  Missouri,  November,  186 1  ;  skirmish  again 
near  Sedalia,  Missouri,  November,  1861 ;  battle  of 
Shiloh,  April  6  and  7,  1862  ,  skirmish  near  Danville,  Mis- 
sissippi, September,  1862;  battle  of  Iuka,  Mississippi, 
September,  1862  ;  skirmish  again  near  Rienzi,  Mississippi, 
same  month,  1862  ;  battle  of  Corinth,  Mississippi,  3d  and 
4th  October,  1862;  skirmish  near  Davis's  Mills,  Hatchee 
River,  Mississippi,  October,  1862;  again  near  "Bone 
Yard,"  Mississippi,  October,  1862;  skirmish  near  Bul- 
lock's Farm,  Kentucky,  December,  1862;  again  near 
same  place,  January,  1S63;  skirmish  with  bushwhackers 
at  James's  Mills,  near  Rolla,  Missouri,  August,  1863  ; 
skirmish  near  Weston,  Missouri,  October,  1864;  again 
near  Blue  River,  Kansas,  November,  1864. 


104 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


CoMMANDHR  T.   A.  M.  CRAVEN,  U.S.N,  (deceased). 

Commander  Tunis  Augustus  Macdonough  Craven 
was  born  in  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  and  perished 
in  the  iron-clad  "  Tecumseh,"  of  which  vessel  he  was  in 
command,  and  which  was  sunk  by  a  torpedo  during  the 
passage  of  Farragut's  fleet  into  Mobile  Bay,  on  the  5th 
of  August,  18(14.  He  was  appointed  midshipman  from 
New  York  in  1829;  became  a  lieutenant  in  1S41;  and 
commander  in  April,  1861.  At  the  time  of  his  death  he 
had  seen  twenty  years  of  naval  sea-service,  beside  eight 
years  on  the  coast  survey,  and  was  a  most  excellent  and 
reliable,  as  well  as  a  gallant  officer. 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  War  he  was  in  command 
of  the  steamer  "  Mohawk,"  in  the  Home  Squadron  ;  from 
which  vessel  he  was  transferred  to  the  command  of  the 
steam-sloop  "  Tuscarora  ;"  and  in  1864,  to  the  command 
of  the   monitor   "  Tecumseh,"   employed   in    the   James 


River  against  Howletts'  and  other  batteries,  and  the  Con- 
federate iron-clads  from  Richmond.  He  sunk  in  the 
main  channel,  at  Trent's  Reach,  four  hulks  filled  with 
'-tciie,  and  completed  other  obstructions  there. 

He  was  afterwards  ordered  down  to  Farragut,  in  the 
Gulf,  and  by  great  exertion  got  there  in  time.  When  the 
fleet  went  in,  under  the  fire  of  Fort  Morgan,  and  at  a 
critical  moment,  the  "  Tecumseh"  was  struck  by  a  tor- 
pedo, ami  almost  instantly  went  down.  The  "  Brooklyn" 
stopped  her  engines,  but  Farragut  ordered  her  to  proceed 
in  line,  and  hailed  Jouett,  in  the  "  Metacomet,"  to  drop  a 
boat  and  save  the  few  people  seen  struggling  in  the 
water.  Acting  Ensign  Nields  went  in  the  boat  and  the 
fleet  passed  on.  Within  three  hundred  yards  of  the  great 
fort,  amidst  pouring  shot  and  shell,  he  picked  up  the  sur- 
vivors. One  of  the  "  Tecumseh's"  boats,  which  floated, 
saved  seven  ;  and  four  swam  on  shore  and  were  made 
prisoners. 

Acting  Masters  Cottiell  and  Langley,  who  were  among 
the  saved,  reported  that,  when  the  torpedo  exploded,  and 
blew  a  large  hole  in  the  bottom,  and  the  vessel  being 
instantly  in  a  sinking  condition,  the  order  was  passed  to 
leave  quarters  and  all  to  save  themselves,  if  they  could. 
"  Commander  Craven  was  in  the  pilot-house  when  the 
torpedo  exploded,  but  his  chivalric  spirit  caused  him  to 
lose  his  life.  We  know  from  the  reports  of  the  officers 
saved  that  he  insisted  on  the  pilots  taking  precedence 
in  descending  the  ladder.  They  both  reached  the  turret, 
but  as  the  pilot  passed  through  the  port-hole  the  vessel 
keeled  over  and  went  down,  taking  with  her  as  gallant 
an  officer  as  there  was  in  the  American  navy.  One 
moment  more  and  his  life  would  have  been  saved 
to  adorn  the  list  of  officers  of  which  he  was  so  bright  a 
member.  No  more  chivalrous  event  occurred  during 
the  four  years'  conflict.  The  example  shown  by  Craven 
should  be  chronicled  in  every  story  of  the  war." 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CI  VIE    WAR. 


105 


MAJOR-GENERAL   GEORGE   CROOK,   U.S.A. 

(deceased). 

Major-General  George  Crook  was  born  in  Ohio, 
and  graduated  at  the  Military  Academy  in  the  Class 
of  1852.  He  was  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant 
of  the  Fourth  Infantry,  and  was  in  garrison  at  Fort 
Columbus,  New  York,  until  his  regiment  sailed  for 
California,  when  he  accompanied  it,  and  was  stationed  at 
Benicia,  Humboldt,  and  Jones  until  1857,  participating  in 
the  escort  of  Topographical  Party,  1S55  ;  Rogue  River 
Expedition,  1856;  and  in  command  of  Pitt  River  Expe- 
dition, 1857,  being  engaged  in  a  skirmish,  where  he  was 
wounded  with  an  arrow.  From  FortTerwaw  he  marched 
to  Vancouver  in  1858,  and  participated  in  the  Yakima 
Expedition  of  that  year. 

He  was  promoted  second  lieutenant  Fourth  Infantry 
July  7,  1853;  first  lieutenant  March  ti,  iS_:;6,and  captain 
May  14,  1861.  Returning  from  the  Pacific  coast  in  1861, 
he  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Thirty-sixth  Ohio  In- 
fantry September  12,  1 86 1 ,  and  participated  in  the  West 
Virginia  operations  in  the  early  part  of  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  and  commanded  the  Third  Provisional  Brigade 
from  May  I  to  August  15,  1S62,  participating  in  the 
action  of  Lewisburg,  where  he  was  wounded  ;  in  the 
Northern  Virginia  campaign  ;  in  the  Maryland  cam- 
paign with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in 
the  battles  of  South  Mountain  and  Antietam,  1862.  He 
was  appointed  brigadier- general  of  volunteers  Septem- 
ber 7,  1862,  and  continued  to  operate  with  his  command 
in  West  Virginia  until  February,  1863,  when  he  was 
ordered  to  the  Western  army,  and  was  in  command  of 
an  independent  division  at  Carthage,  Tennessee,  until 
June  of  the  same  year,  and  subsequently  participated  in 
the  Tennessee  campaign  of  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland. 
He  was  placed  in  command  of  Second  Cavalry  Divi- 
sion Jul)-  1,  1863,  and  was  engaged  at  Hoover's  Gap 
Chickamauga  ;  action  at  foot  of  Cumberland  Mountains, 
McMinnville,  and  Farmington,  and  almost  daily  skir- 
mishes. 

General  Crook  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  the 
Kanawha  District,  West  Virginia,  in  February,  1864,  and 
was  engaged  in  numerous  raids  and  actions  until  the 
following  July,  when  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of 
the  troops  of  the  Department  of  West  Virginia,  and  par- 
ticipated in  several  actions.  He  was  in  command  of  the 
Department  of  West  Virginia,  and  participated  in  General 
Sheridan's  Shenandoah  campaign  of  1864,  being  engaged 
in  the  action  of  Berry  ville,  battles  of  Opequan  and  Fisher's 
Hill,  action  of  Strasburg,  and  battle  of  Cedar  Creek.  He 
was  appointed  major-general  of  volunteers  October  21, 
1864,  and  was  serving  with  his  command  in  West  Vir- 
ginia when  he  was  captured  at  Cumberland,  Maryland, 
February  21,  1865,  Returning  to  duty,  he  was  placed 
in  command  of  the  cavalry  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac 


March  26,  1865,  and  held  that  command  until  the  sur- 
render of  Lee,  being  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Dinwidclie 
Court-House,  action  of  Jetersville,  battle  of  Sailor's 
Creek,  combat  of  Farmville,  and  capitulation  of  Appo- 
mattox Court-House.  He  was  then  placed  in  command 
of  the  District  of  Wilmington,  North  Carolina,  where  he 
remained  until  January  15,  1866,  when  he  was  mustered 
out  of  the  volunteer  service. 

General  Crook  had  conferred  upon  him,  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  and  distinguished  services,  the  following 
brevets  in  the  regular  army  :  Major,  for  Lewisburg, 
Virginia;  lieutenant-colonel,  for  Antietam;  colonel,  for 
Farmington  ;  brigadier-general,  for  the  campaign  of  1864 
in  West  Virginia  ;  major-general,  for  Fisher's  Hill.  He 
was  also  brevctted  major-general  of  volunteers  for 
"  gallant  and  distinguished  services  in  West  Virginia." 
He  became  major  of  the  Third  U.  S.  Infantry  July  18, 
1866,  and  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Twenty-third  Infantry 
July  28,  1866,  and  was  on  a  Board  to  Examine  Rifle 
Tactics  at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  then  awaiting  orders 
until  the  following  November,  when  he  was  placed  in 
command  of  the  District  of  Boise,  Idaho. 

He  was  appointed  brigadier-general  U.  S.  A.  Octo- 
ber 29,  1873,  and  major-general  U.  S.  A.  April  6,  18SS. 
He  commanded  the  Department  of  the  Platte  on  two 
different  occasions,  also  the  Department  of  Arizona 
and  the  Military  Division  of  the  Missouri,  and,  while 
holding  the  latter  command,  died  suddenly  at  Chicago, 
Illinois,  April  5,  i8<jO. 

While  in  command  of  the  Departments  of  the  Platte 
and  Arizona,  General  Crook  commanded  the  expe- 
dition against  Sitting  Bull  and  the  hostile  Sioux  in  the 
summer  of  1876.  In  1889  he  was  one  of  the  commis- 
sioners appointed  by  the  President  of  the  United  States 
to  treat  with  the  Indians  on  the  subject  of  opening  their 
lands  to  settlement. 


io5 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NA  FY  {regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  PEIRCF.   CROSBY.   U.S.N,   (retired). 

Rear-Admiral  Peirce  Crosby  was  born  in  Delaware 
County,  Pennsylvania,  and  appointed  midshipman  from 
that  State  in  June,  1838.  Served  in  the"  Ohio,"  74,  flag- 
ship in  the  Mediterranean  ;  then  in  the  "  Experiment,"  and 
the  steamer  "  Mississippi."  I  le  then  went  to  the  Mediter- 
ranean again,  in  the  "Congress,"  was  transferred  to  the 
"  Preble,"  and  came  home,  in  1843,  to  go  to  the  Naval 
School  at  Philadelphia.  Passed  midshipman  in  1844.  For 
two  years  he  was  on  the  Coast  Survey,  and  then,  during 
the  Mexican  War,  in  the  "  Decatur,"  at  the  attack  and 
capture  of  Tuspan  and  Tabasco,  and  in  the  "  Petrel"  until 
the  peace.  Served  in  the  "  Relief "  in  1849-50,  carry- 
ing stores  to  the  Mediterranean  and  west  coast  of 
Africa. 

Commissioned  lieutenant  in  September',  1S5  3,  and  made 
a  long  cruise  on  the  coast  of  Brazil,  in  the  "  German- 
town."  He  then  made  another  cruise  in  the  Gulf, — 
part  of  the  time  under  Captain  Fafragut.  While  at- 
tached to  the  receiving-ship  at  Philadelphia,  the  Civil 
War  began.  Crosby  was  at  once  actively  employed, 
in  Chesapeake  Bay,  keeping  open  communications,  and 
cutting  off  supplies  and  communications.  He  was  then 
ordered  to  the  frigate  "  Cumberland,"  and  detailed  for 
duty  on  shore,  at  Fortress  Monroe.  Transported  the 
troops  at  Hampton  Creek  before  and  after  the  fight  at 
Big  Bethel.  His  services  in  the  landing  during  the  at- 
tack upon  Forts  Clarke  and  Hatteras  were  remarkable 
in  the  face  df  bad  weather.  Lieutenant  Crosby's  advice 
enabled  the  handful  of  troops  left  on  the  beach,  when  the 
squadron  was  driven  to  sea,  to  make  such  a  show  that 
their  critical  condition  was  not  discovered  by  the  enemy. 


He  was  especially  mentioned  for  his  conduct  on  this 
occasion.  In  the  winter  of  1861  he  took  command  of 
the  "  Pinola,"  one  of  the  new  steam  gun-vessels.  In 
the  "  Pinola"  he  joined  Admiral  Farragut,  in  the  spring 
of  1862.  On  his  way  he  captured  a  cotton  prize, 
and  sent  her  north.  He  commanded  the  "  Pinola"  on 
the  memorable  night  when  she  co-operated  with  the 
"  Jtasca"  in  cutting  the  chain  barrier  of  the  Mississippi. 
The  "  Itasca"  slipped  the  end  of  the  cable  on  the  oppo- 
site shore  from  Fort  Jackson,  but  in  doing  so  ran  hard 
aground.  By  Crosby's  exertions  she  was  rescued  from 
this  position  before  daylight.  The  "  Pinola"  had  to  blow 
up  the  vessels  holding  the  chains,  directly  under  the 
guns  of  the  fort.  Three  different  attempts  were  made, 
under  fire  of  the  fort,  but  each  time  something  went 
wrong  with  the  wires.  At  last  Lieutenant  Crosby  found 
that  a  way  was  opened,  sufficient  for  the  fleet  to  pass, 
and  so  reported.  Lieutenant  Crosby  was  engaged  at 
the  passage  of  the  forts,  the  Chalmette  batteries,  and 
the  capture  of  New  (  hicans.  He  was  also  at  the  pas- 
sage and  repassage  of  the  batteries  at  Vicksburg,  and 
the  engagement  with  the  "Arkansas."  In  the  fall  of 
1862,  he  was  ordered  north  to  command  the  iron-clad 
"Sangamon."  Promoted  commander  September,  1862. 
He  was  soon  detached  from  "  Sangamon"  and  made 
fleet- captain,  North  Atlantic  Squadron,  under  Admiral 
Lee.  Commanded  an  expedition  up  the  York  River, 
co-operating  with  General  Dix. 

In  command  of  the  "Florida,"  in  the  winter  of  1863, 
destroyed  two  blockade-runners,  at  Masonborough  Inlet, 
under  the  fire  of  the  shore  batteries.  In  1 864  commanded 
the  "  Keystone  State,"  and  captured  five  blockade-run- 
ners, lie  was  then  ordered  to  the  "  Muscoota,"  but 
soon  detached  and  ordered  to  command  "  Metacomet." 
Blockaded  Galveston  in  her,  and  was  in  command  of 
her  at  the  battle  of  Mobile  Bay.  Planned  and  directed 
the  construction  of  torpedo-nets,  and  spread  them  in  the 
Blakely  River,  removed  one  hundred  and  forty  torpedoes, 
and  cleared  the  way  for  the  squadron  to  pass  safely 
up  to  Mobile.  He  then  occupied  forts  "  Huger"  and 
"  Tracy"  on  the  night  the  rebel  forces  evacuated.  Espe- 
cially commended  in  the  official  report  of  Admiral  That- 
cher. In  September,  1865,  he  was  ordered  to  command 
the  "  Shamokin,"  on  the  coast  of  Brazil,  where  he  re- 
mained until  [868.  He  was  made  captain  in  May  of 
that  year.  While  in  command  of  "  Shamokin,"  conveyed 
Minister  Washburn  on  his  mission  to  Paraguay. 

He  was  commissioned  as  commodore  1874.  Rear- 
admiral  March,  1882.  Commanded  South  Atlantic 
Squadron.  Commanded  Asiatic  Squadron.  Retired, 
on  his  own  application,   1883. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


107 


CAPTAIN  WM.  H.  H.  CROWHLL,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Wm.  II.  H.  Crowell  (Sixth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Ohio,  January  25,  [841,  and  at  the  commence- 
ment of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  entered  the  volunteer 
service  as  private  of  Company  F,  First  Ohio  Artillery, 
April  21,  1 861,  and  served  under  General  McClellan  in 
West  Virginia,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Phil- 
ippi,  June  3,  1S61  (which  was  the  first  contact  of  the 
hostile  forces  after  the  fall  of  Fort  Sumter),  and  Laurel 
Hill,  Virginia.  He  was  honorably  mustered  out  July 
27,  1 861 ,  but  re  entered  the  volunteer  service  December 
12,  1861,  as  second  lieutenant  Fifteenth  Ohio  Battery, 
and  served  in  the  Western  army  during  the  campaign 
of  1862,  participating  in  the  battle  of  the  Hatchie 
October  7,  1862.  He  was  in  the  campaign  against 
Corinth,  Mississippi,  and  under  General  Grant  in  his 
Mississippi  campaign  of  1S62. 

He  resigned  December  15,  1862,  for  the  purpose  of 
recruiting  a  battery  for  the  Second  Ohio  Heavy  Artil- 
lery, and  was  appointed  recruiting  officer  by  the  Gov- 
ernor of  Ohio,  with  the  rank  of  second  lieutenant.  He 
was  promoted  to  the  captaincy  of  the  battery  Septem- 
ber 9,  1S63,  and  served  with  it  at  Munfordville  in  the 
fall  and  winter  of  1863.  He  also  served  with  General 
Sherman  in  his  East  Tennessee  campaign,  returning  to 
his  command  at  Knoxville,  Tennessee,  from  the  north 
in  December,  1864.  On  arriving  at  Nashville,  he  found 
the  enemy  in  possession  of  the  road  and  country  gener- 
ally between  Nashville  and  Murfreesborough,  and,  being 
indefinitely  detained  and  cut  off  from  his  command,  he 
reported,  by  order  of  General  George  H.  Thomas,  to 
General  Steadman  for  duty,  and  acted  under  his  orders 
during  the  battle  of  Nashville.  He  was  then  stationed  at 
Athens,  Tennessee,  where,  by  order  of  General  Thomas, 
he  fired  one  hundred  guns  in  honor  of  the  fall  of  Rich- 
mond. 

He  commanded  Forts  Willich  and  Terrill,  at  the 
crossing  of  Green  River,  at  Munfordville,  Kentucky, 
and  commanded  a  battalion  of  the  Second  Ohio  Heavy 
Artillery  in  1864-65. 

Captain  Crowell  was  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer 
service  on    the  21st  of  August,    1865,  but  entered    the 


regular  service  as  second  lieutenant  of  the  Seventeenth 
Infantry  January  22,  1867.  He  was  promoted  first  lieu- 
tenant December  17,  1867,  serving  with  his  regiment 
until  May  27,  1869,  when  he  was  placed  on  the  unas- 
signed  list  of  officers.  While  unassigned  Captain  Cro- 
well was  engaged  in  reconstruction  duty  under  General 
Canby  in  Virginia,  and  General  Ames  in  Mississippi ; 
in  the  former  State  he  was  made  military  commissioner 
and  superintendent  of  elections  for  five  counties,  and  in 
Mississippi  for  two;  his  duties  were  to  appoint  and  in- 
struct boards  of  registration  in  the  counties  under  his 
control  and  recommend  for  appointment  all  county  offi- 
cers, and  to  conduct  and  report  the  result  of  the  election 
as  directed  in  orders. 

He  was  assigned  to  the  Sixth  Infantry  December  15, 
1870,  and  promoted  to  captain  October  31,  1883.  He 
served  with  his  regiment  on  frontier  duty  in  the  Depart- 
ments of  the  Platte  and  the  Missouri  to  April,  1889, 
having  been  adjutant  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  from  April 
10,  1882,  to  October  31,  1883.  In  1889  he  was  ordered 
to  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  and  assigned  to  duty  as 
assistant  instructor  in  infantry  tactics,  in  connection  with 
the  School  of  Application.  Captain  Crowell's  present 
station  is  Fort  Thomas,  Kentucky. 


io8 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


COLONEL    AND   BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL   GEORGE 
W.  CULLUM,  U.S.A.  (deceased). 

(' \i:r.    \\d   Brevet  Major-General  George  W. 

I  i  i  i  i  m  was  born  in  New  York,  and  graduated  from 
the  Military  Academy  July  i,  1833.  He  was  promoted 
brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Corps  of  Engineers  the 
same  day,  and  served  as  assistant  engineer  in  the  con- 
struction  o)  several  government  works  until  April  20, 
[836, when  he  was  promoted  second  lieutenant.  He  was 
captain  July  7,  1838,  and  continued  as  superintending 
engineer  in  the  construction  of  important  works  along  the 
Atlantii   coa  1 

II  was  superintending  engineer  for  devising  and 
constructing  sapper,  miner,  and  pontoon  trains  for  our 
armies  in  the  war  with  Mexico,  1847-48;  he  was  de- 
tailed on  special  duty  at  West  Point,  New  York,  pre- 
paring lor  publication  a  memoir  on  military  bridges,  with 
India-rubber  pontoons,  and  construction  of  Cadet  Bar- 
rai  ks  at  West  Point,  New  York,  [847-48,  and  at  the  same 
place  as  instructor  in  practical  military  engineering  and 
commandant  of  sappers,  miners,  and  pontoniers  to  July 
5.  1850. 

Captain  Cullum  then  visited  Europe,  Asia,  Africa,  and 
the  West  1  ni  lie,  on  a  sick-leave  of  absence,  [850-52,  when 
he  returned  to  tin.:  Military  Academy  in  his  former  posi- 
tion, retaining  it  to  January  1,  1X55.  From  that  time 
until  the  commencement  of  the  war  of  the   Rebellion, 

■  'lain  Cullum  was  superintending  engineer  in  the  con 

11  lion  of  the  New-  York  assay-office,  of  Fort  Sumter, 
Castle  Pinckney,  and  fort  Moultrie,  and  other  work  in 
(  harleston  harbor ;  repairs  to  works  at  Forts  Macon  and 
1  ■>  iwell,  North  <  larolina  ;  member  of  hoard  to  devise  the 
defem  esol  Sandy  Hook,  New  Jersey;  and  superintend 
of  the  1  onstruction  and  repair  of  many  other  works  af 
tls     Atlantic  seaboard. 


Captain  Cullum  was  appointed  lieutenant-colonel  (staff 
aide-de-camp  to  the  general-in-chief)  April  9,  1861,  ami 
colonel  (staff,  in  same  position)  August  6,  1 86 1 .  He  was 
a  member  of  the  lTnited  States  Sanitary  Commission  from 
June  13,  [861,  to  February  24,  1864,  ami  an  associate 
member  of  the  Western  Sanitary  Commission  from  Jan- 
uary 2  to  July  1 1,  [862. 

He  was  promoted  major  of  Engineers  August  6,  and 
brigadier-general  of  volunteers  November  1,  (86r,  serv- 
ing successively  as  chief  engineer  of  Military  Depart- 
ments ami  chief  of  staff  to  General  Ilalleck,  while  com- 
manding the  armies  and  while  chief  of  staff  of  the  army, 
to  September  5,  1864. 

General  Cullum  was  employed  during  this  time  in  con- 
struction of  fortifications  in  the  field,  organizing  defences, 
etc.,  and  was  chief  engineer  in  the  campaign  in  Tennessee 
and  Mississippi  in  1862,  being  engaged  in  the  advance 
upon  and  siege  of  Corinth  and  in  fortifying  Corinth  until 
July  18,  1862,  and  then  employed  on  man}'  other  duties 
connected  with  the  Engineer  Department  of  the  army, 
which  cannot  be  enumerated  here  for  want  of  space,  until 
the  ch isc  ( if  the  war.  He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel 
of  the  Corps  of  Engineers  March  3,  1863,  and  brevetted 
colonel  and  brigadier-general  March  13,  1865,  for  "  faith- 
ful and  meritorious  services  during  the  Rebellion,"  and 
major-general  March  13.  1865,  for  "faithful,  meritorious, 
and  distinguished  services  during  the  war  of  the  Rebel- 
lion." 

General  Cullum  was  selected  as  superintendent  of  the 
U.  S.  Military  Academy  September  8,  1864,  and  retained 
the  position  until  August  28,  1866.  He  was  mustered 
out  of  the  volunteer  service  September  1,  1866,  and  was 
awaiting  orders  to  the  November  following,  when  he  was 
detailed  as  .1  member  of  the  Board  of  Engineers  to  carry- 
out  in  detail  the  modifications  of  the  defences  in  the  vicin- 
ity of  New  York,  as  proposed  by  the  board  on  January 
2J,  1864;  and  of  Board  of  Engineers  for  Fortifications 
and  River  and  Harbor  Obstructions  required  for  the 
defence  of  the  Territory  of  the  United  States  since  May 
18,   [867. 

He  was  promoted  colonel  of  the  Corps  of  Engineers 
March  7,  1867. 

General  Cullum  was  retired  from  active  service  January 
13,  1874,  and  died  in  1892. 

He  was  the  author  of  a  work  on  "  Military  Bridges, 
with  India-rubber  Pontoons,"  1X49;  of  "Register  of 
Officers  and  Graduates  of  the  United  States  Military 
Academy,"  from  March  16,  1802  (when  established)  to 
January  I,  1X50;  translator  and  editor  of  Duparcq's 
"  Elements  of  Military  Art  and  History,"  1863;  author 
of  "Systems  of  Military  Bridges,"  1863;  of  various 
military  memoirs,  reviews,  and  reports,  1863-67;  and  of 
"Biographical  Register  of  the  Officers  and  Graduates  of 
the  United  States  Military  Academy,"  1891. 


WHO  SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


109 


BRHVET  MAJOR  HARRY  COOKE  GUSHING,  U.S.A. 

Brevet  Major  Harry  Choice  Cushing  (captain 
Fourth  Artillery)  was  born  November  8,  1841,  at  Balti- 
more, Maryland.  Went  to  Providence,  Rhode  Island,  in 
1849,  and  lived  there  until  the  breaking  out  of  the  war. 
Graduated  1S60  at  the  Providence  High  School  ;  under- 
graduate of  Brown  University,  which  he  left  to  join  Bat- 
tery A,  First  Rhode  Island  Light  Artillery.  Corporal 
and  sergeant  therein  from  June  6  to  November  5,  1S61, 
participating  in  battle  of  Bull  Run,  July  21,  1861.  Second 
lieutenant  Fourth  Artillery  October  24,  1 86 r,  command- 
ing section  in  Light  Battery  F,  Fourth  Artillery,  and  en- 
gaged in  the  following  actions  :  Dam  No.  5,  December 
11,  1861;  Newtown,  Virginia,  May  24,  1802;  Middle- 
town,  Virginia,  May  24,  1862  ;  Winchester,  Virginia, 
May  25,  1862;  Cedar  Mountain,  Virginia,  August  9,  1S62  ; 
(brevetted  first  lieutenant)  Freeman's  Ford,  Virginia, 
August  23,  1862;  Antietam,  Maryland,  September  17, 
1862.  First  lieutenant  Fourth  Artillery  September  17, 
1862,  and  ordered  to  Army  of  the  Cumberland.  Com- 
manding Light  Battery  H,  Fourth  Artillery,  ami  engaged 
at  Stewart's  Creek,  Tennessee,  December  29,  1S62; 
Stone  River,  Tennessee,  December  31,  1862,  to  Janu- 
ary 2,  1863;  Woodbury,  Tennessee,  January  24,  1863; 
Chickamauga,  Georgia,  September  19-20,  1863  (bre- 
vetted captain),  and  siege  of  Chattanooga,  Tennessee, 
October  to  November,  1863.  Ordered,  March,  1864,  to 
Army  of  the  Potomac  ;  Inspector  of  Artillery,  Cavalry 
Corps,  Arm_\'  of  the  Potomac,  and  engaged  at  Parker's 
Store,  May  5  ;  Wilderness,  May  6  ;  Todd's  Tavern,  May  8 ; 
Spottsylvania,  May  9;  Childsburg,  May  9;  South  Anna, 
May  10;  Yellow  Tavern,  May  1  1  ;  Meadow  Bridges,  May 
12;  I  Ianover,  May  2;  ;  Hawes'  Shop,  May  28;  Old  Church, 
May  30;  Cold  Harbor,  June  I  ;  White  House,  June  20; 
St.  Mary's  Church,  June  2^  ;  siege  of  Petersburg,  July  ; 
Smithfield,  August  28;  (brevetted  major)  Bunker's  Hill, 
November  9;  and  Cedar  Springs,  November  12,  1864; 
with  the  Cavalry  Corps,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  Sheri- 
dan's army  in  the  Valley.  On  general  recruiting  service 
February,  1865,  to  October,  1866;  rejoined  regiment 
October,  1866,  and  served  therewith  continuously  since. 
Captain  Fourth  Artillery  August  22,  1S71  ;  in  command 
of  Batter\-  C  until  November,  1887;  since  when  he  has 


commanded  Light  Battery  B.  Since  the  war  he  has 
served  at  various  posts  in  the  Division  of  the  Atlantic 
and  Division  of  the  Pacific,  and  participated  in  the  fol- 
lowing Indian  campaigns:  Sioux  campaign  of  1876; 
Xez  Perce  campaign  of  1877,  and  Apache  campaign  of 
1 88 1.  During  the  Nez  Perce  campaign  he  was  in  com- 
mand of  a  separate  column  of  General  Howard's  army, 
and  was  specially  and  particularly  mentioned  by  that 
officer  for  the  energy  and  good  judgment  displayed  by 
him  in  executing  the  duties  imposed  on  him.  He  is  a 
graduate  of  the  Artillery  School,  Class  of  1870.  Brown 
University  conferred  upon  him,  June  id,  187 1,  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Arts.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Military  Or- 
der of  the  Loyal  Legion. 

For  services  in  action  during  the  war  he  was  men- 
tioned particularly  in  the  reports  of  his  brigade,  division, 
corps,  and  army  commanders  of  Banks's,  Pope's,  and 
Rosecrans's  campaigns. 

Major  Cushing  is  a  direct  descendant  of  Nicholas 
Cooke,  who  was  Governor  of  Rhode  Island  during  the 
!  Revolution  ;  of  Colonel  Samuel  Barrett,  one  of  the  com- 
manders at  Lexington  ;  of  Captain  Jarvis,  of  Massachu- 
setts Line,  and  Colonel  Benjamin  Church,  who  com- 
manded the  Provincial  army  during  King  Philip's  War, 
and  who  killed  that  celebrated  Indian. 


no 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   XAl'Y  {regular) 


MAJOR  SAMUEL  T.  GUSHING.   U.S.A. 

Major  Samuel  T.  Cushing  (Subsistence  Department) 
was  born  in  Rhode  Island  September  14,  1S39,  and  was 
graduated  from  the  Military  Academy  July  1,  i860.  He 
was  promoted  acting  second  lieutenant  of  the  Tenth 
Infantry,  and  served  on  the  frontier  in  the  Navajo  cam- 
paign, and  at  Albuquerque  and  Santa  Fe  in  the  fall  and 
winter  of  [860-61.  He  was  promoted  second  lieutenant 
of  the  Second  Infantry  January  19,  and  first  lieutenant 
May-  14,  [861,  serving  as  such  in  the  defences  of  Wash- 
ington during  that  year.  He  served  in  the  Manassas 
campaign  as  aide-de-camp  to  Colonel  1).  S.  Miles, 
Second  Infantry,  commanding  the  reserve  division  ;  and 
as  acting  assistant  inspector-general  at  the  head-quarters 
of  General  McDowell,  July  and  August,  [861. 

lie  was  then  detailed  as  assistant  signal-officer  at 
(amp  of  Instruction,  Georgetown,  I).  C.,  from  Septem- 
ber, [861,  to  May,  1862,  and  then  was  placed  in  charge 
of  the  Signal  Office  at  Washington,  1).  C.,  where  he  re- 
mained to  (  Ictober,  1862,  in  the  mean  time  having  been 
promoted  captain  February  15,  1862. 

Captain  Cushing  was  appointed  captain  and  commis- 
sary of  subsistence  February  9,  1863,  and  made  major  in 
the  Signal  Corps  May  29,  [863,  which  latter  appointment 
he  declined. 

He  was  assigned  to  duty  as  instructor  of  signalling 
at  the  Military  Academy  July,  1863,  which  position 
he  retained   until  January,    1864,  when  he  was  ordered 


on  commissary  duty  in  Tennessee,  Kentucky,  Indiana, 
and  Mississippi  from  1864  to  1866. 

Captain  Cushing  was  appointed  brevet  major  March 
13,  1865,  "for  faithful  and  meritorious  services  during 
the  war." 

He  was  at  St.  Louis  in  March  and  April;  on  inspec- 
tor's duty  from  April  16  to  August  23,  1866;  on  frontier 
duty  in  the  latter  part  of  that  year,  and  again  on  inspec- 
tion duty  from  March  to  May,  1867;  then  at  Fort 
Laramie.  Wyoming,  until  ordered  again  on  inspection 
duty  from  September  to  November,  1867,  and  then 
stationed  at  Cheyenne,  Wyoming,  to  December  of  the 
same  year.  I  fe  was  chief  commissary  of  the  Department 
of  the  Platte  to  March  4,  1867,  and  in  April,  1868,  was 
ordered  to  Texas,  where  he  held  the  position  of  chief 
commissary  of  the  department  until  May,  1873,  when  his 
station  was  changed  to  New  Mexico,  where  he  was  chief 
commissary  of  the  district  until  July,  1874, at  which  time 
he  was  ordered  to  Louisville,  Kentucky,  as  chief  com- 
missary of  the  Department  of  the  South  and  purchasing 
commissary.  From  this  post  he  was  transferred  to 
Atlanta,  Georgia,  September  20,  1  876,  remaining  there  to 
February  10,  1877. 

Captain  Cushing's  field  of  action  was  changed  to  the 
Pacific  coast  February  22,  1877,  where  he  performed  the 
duties  of  purchasing  commissary  at  San  Francisco,  Cali- 
fornia, remaining  there  until  1880,  in  the  mean  time 
having  participated  in  the  campaign  against  hostile  Pan- 
nock  Indians  from  June  to  September,  1878,  serving  as 
chief  commissary  of  the  Department  of  the  Columbia 
during  the  campaign  and  until  May,  1883,  when  he  was 
placed  on  special  duty  in  the  office  of  the  commissary- 
general  of  subsistence  at  Washington,  remaining  there 
to  February  12,  1884.  At  this  time  he  was  detailed  on 
duty  at  Pittsburg,  Pennsylvania,  distributing  supplies  to 
the  sufferers  from  the  flood  on  the  Ohio  River,  which 
duty  occupied  him  until  March  17,  [884,  when  he  was 
once  more  ordered  to  Texas,  performing  the  duties  of 
chief  commissary  of  that  department  and  purchasing  and 
depot  commissary  of  subsistence  at  San  Antonio.  Being 
relieved  from  this  duty  in  August,  1889,  he  was  ordered 
to  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  as  purchasing  and  depot 
commissary  of  subsistence,  part  of  the  time  being  chief 
commissary  of  the  Department  of  the  Missouri. 

Captain  Cushing  was  promoted  major  in  the  subsist- 
ence department  August  28,  1888,  and  is  at  present  on 
dutv  at  Fort  Leavenworth. 


U'/fO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


1 1 1 


COMMANDER  WILLIAM   B.  CUSHING.   U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Commander  William  B.  Cushing  was  born  in  Wis- 
consin, in  November,  1842,  and  was  appointed  to  the 
Naval  Academy  in  September,  1  S 5 7 .  lie  resigned  in 
March,  1861,  and  went  into  the  naval  service  afloat  as  an 
acting  master's  mate,  as  he  was  of  that  temperament 
which  would  not  permit  him  to  remain  quietly  at  the 
Naval  School  when  war  was  at  hand.  His  was  a  dis- 
position which  could,  under  such  circumstances,  give  no 
thought  to  theoretical  studies, — fortunately  for  us,  for 
we  wanted  just  such  men  at  th.it  time.  He  served  in 
the  "Cambridge"  for  a  short  time,  and  was  restored  to 
his  rank  as  midshipman  in  October,  1861.  After  a  sick- 
leave  he  was  ordered  to  the  "Minnesota,"  and  promoted 
to  lieutenant  in  [uly,  in  common  with  a  large  number  of 
young  officers  necessary  to  supply  the  demands  of  the 
service  growing  out  of  the  Civil  War.  Henceforth,  for  a 
period  of  nearly  three  years,  his  service  was  eminently 
conspicuous  in  deeds  of  daring.  While  in  command  of 
a  small  steamer  upon  the  blockade,  he  often  visited  the 
inland  waters  of  the  enemy  at  the  risk  of  his  life.  He 
usually  went  at  night,  lying  concealed  during  the  follow- 
ing day,  and  always  having  in  view  some  definite  object. 
He  had,  in  narrow  waters,  frequent  fights  with  the  field- 
batteries  of  the  enemy.  Once,  while  blockading  oil  New 
Topsail  Inlet,  he  reconnoitred  .1  schooner  lying  inside, 
but  was  soon  under  the  fire  of  a  considerable  force  with 
a  field-piece  and  small-arms.  He  retired;  but,  late  that 
evening,  he  anchored  his  vessel  close  to  the  beach, 
abreast  of  the  schooner,  and  several  miles  distant  from 
the  entrance  to  the  inlet.  Then  he  sent  two  boats  on 
shore,  the  larger  one  to  act  as  support.  They  hauled 
the  smaller  boat  across  the  sand-beach,  and  launched  her 
in  the  inlet  beyond.  Ensign  Coney,  with  six  men,  then 
reconnoitred,  and  found  that  about  twenty  men  and  a 
small  piece  of  artillery  were  guarding  the  vessel.  In 
spite  of  this,  an  attack  was  made,  the  enemy  routed,  and 
ten  prisoners,  a  howitzer,  and  eighteen  small-arms  cap- 
tured. The  schooner  and  adjacent  salt-works  w:ere  de- 
stroyed, and  the  expedition  rejoined  the  vessel  without 
loss. 

Once,  while  blockading  off  Cape  Fear  River,  Cush- 
ing went  in  his  gig,  with  six  men,  up  the  river  past 
Fort  Caswell,  to  Smithville,  two  miles  above,  and  got 
important  information.  Once  he  entered  the  river  in 
the  same  way,  captured  the  mail-rider  for  Fort  Fisher, 
and  possessed  himself  of  his  bag. 

His  most  remarkable  feat,  however,  was  the  destruc- 
tion of  the  iron-plated  ram  "Albemarle,"  while  that  for- 
midable vessel  was  secured  to  a  wharf  at  Plymouth, 
North  Carolina,  with  a  guard  of  logs  placed  around  her 
at  a  distance  of  thirty  feet, — her  crew  on  board  to  use 
her  guns,  and  a  company  of  soldiers  on  the  wharf  with 


small-arms  and  howitzers.  Unfortunately,  the  reporters 
for  the  Northern  press  had  found  out  that  a  torpedo-boat 
was  preparing  for  those  waters,  and,  of  course,  the  infor- 
mation was  transmitted  to  the  enemy,  so  that  they  had 
ample  time  for  preparation.  The  torpedo  was  of  the 
earl_\-  "boom"  kind,  carried  in  a  steam-launch.  The 
enemy  was  vigilant,  and  Cushing's  approach  was  discov- 
ered after  he  had  ascended  the  river,  but  before  he  came 
very  near.  But,  nothing  daunted  by  the  fire  of  artillery 
and  musketry,  he  put  on  steam,  jumped  his  launch  over 
the  logs,  lowered  his  torpedo  in  a  most  deliberate  way, 
and  blew  the  vessel  up  at  the  very  moment  when  a  shell 
from  one  of  the  heavy  guns  of  the  "Albemarle"  and  the 
column  of  water  from  the  explosion  of  the  torpedo  sent 
the  launch  to  the  bottom.  Cushing,  Paymaster  Swan, 
and  others  escaped,  after  much  exposure  in  swimming 
down  the  ice-cold  water  and  hiding  in  the  swamps.  But 
the  terror  of  the  "  Sounds"  was  safely  disposed  of.  For 
this  act  he  was  made  lieutenant-commander,  being  then 
about  twenty-two  years  of  age.  His  entire  career  was  a 
daring  one,  but  he  generally  succeeded  in  his  undertak- 
ings, because  the)  were  carefully  planned  and  carried  out 
with  wonderful  nerve. 

When  peace  came  Cushing  seemed  to  suffer  from  a 
lack  of  purpose,  and  he  could  not  reconcile  himself  to 
the  perfunctory  naval  life.  After  the  war  he  was  execu- 
tive-officer of  the  "  Lancaster."  He  commanded  the 
"  Maumee,"  on  the  Asiatic  Station,"  for  three  years.  He 
was  promoted  to  commander  in  the  regular  order  in 
January,  1872,  when  he  was  about  thirty  years  old. 
He  then  commanded  the  "Wyoming." 

In  the  spring  of  1874  he  was  ordered  to  the  Wash- 
ington Navy-Yard,  but  was  soon  detached  at  his  own 
!  request.  He  soon  showed  symptoms  of  serious  mental 
derangement,  and  was  removed  to  the  Government 
Hospital,  where  he  died  December  17,  1S74,  at  the  age 
of  thirty-two  years. 


1 12 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD  NAVY  (**< 


CAPTAIN   C.  C.  CUSICK.  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Captain  C.  C.  Cusick  was  born  in  Niagara  County, 
New  York,  August  2,  1835.  He  is  the  paternal  grand- 
son of  Nicholas  Cusick,  an  officer  of  the  Revolutionary 
army  of  [776,  who  was  an  intimate  friend  and  co-laborer 
of  Washington  and  Marquis  de  Lafayette;  the  maternal 
grandson  of  Captain  Chew,  of  the  British  army,  and  the 
sun  of  [ames  Nicholas  Cusick,  who  was  for  years  the 
associate  and  companion  of  Catlin  and  Schoolcraft,  the 
Indian  historians,  contributing  largely  to  their  work  con- 
cerning the  subject  of  "The  Myths  of  the  New  World." 
His  forest  home  in  Western  New  York  was  honored  by 
the  frequent  visits  of  .Audubon.  Captain  Cusick  is  now 
the  only  representative  of  the  Six  Nations  of  New  York 
favored  with  a  commission  in  the  regular  army.  As  a 
hereditary  official  of  the  ancient  Iroquois  confederacy, 
he  was  installed  to  office  September  6,  i860,  as  sui  1 
to  William  Chew,  Si..  Sachem,  and  vacated  the  office 
June  20,  1S66,  he  having  received  an  appointment  in  the 
regular  army. 

lie  entered  the  volunteer  service  during  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion  as  second  lieutenant  of  the  <  ine  Hundred  and 
Thirty-second  Infantry  August  14,  [862;  was  promoted 
first  lieutenant  July  I,  1863,  and  captain  May  31,  1865, 
but  owing  to  the  long  delay  before  the  last  commission 
was  received  was  not  mustered  in  to  that  rank.  He  was 
assigned  to  duty  at  Suffolk,  Virginia,  from  Octobei  to 
the  latter  part  of  Decembi  participated  in  several 

reconnoissances  and  engagements  in  the  Blackwater  re- 

1   and   vicinity  of  Suffolk,  Virginia;    served   at    ' 
Berne.  North  Carolina,  from  January  2,  1863,  until  March 
7,  1865,  uty,  the  defence  of  New  Bi 

and  active  field  duty  ;  timing  the  month  of  March,  1 
the  One  Hundred  and  Thirty-second  New  York  Infantry 
inie  a  part  of  the  Twenty-third  Army  Corps,  and  ad- 


vanced with  it  into  the  interior  of  North  Carolina  under 
Major-General  Schofield ;  commanded  the  large  escort 
of  infantry  for  General  Sherman's  supply-train  from 
Goldsborough  to  Kingston,  North  Carolina,  and  return; 
pending  the  surrender  of  General  Johnston-  army  near 
Raleigh,  North  Carolina,  he  was  assigned  to  duty  as  act- 
ing assistant  ordnance  officer  of  the  Second  Division, 
Twenty-third  Army  Corps. 

Captain  Cusick  led  a  charging  force  at  night  composed 
of  two  companies  of  the  One  Hundred  and  Thirty-second 
New  York  Infantry  on  works  at  Jackson's  Mills,  North 
Carolina;  entire  Confederate  grand  guard  captured; 
1  olonel  Foulke,  commandant  of  Kingston,  North  Caro- 
lina, attempted  the  rescue  of  prisoners  the  same  night ; 
he  was  also  captured,  together  with  his  entire  stall  and 
escort;  led  a  charging  party  on  works  at  Southwest 
Creek,  North  Carolina,  with  one  hundred  and  fifty 
selected  men;  works  captured  and  colors  planted;  Feb- 
ruary, 1S64,  participated  in  the  heroic  defence  of  Bache- 
lor's Creek  Bridge,  and  other  points  of  crossing,  during 
the  advance  on  New  Berne  by  the  Confederate  forces 
under  General  Pickett ;  participated  in  the  severe  battle- 
that  was  fought  at  Wise's  Forks,  near  Kingston,  North 
(  arolina,  March  9-1 1,  1865.  He  was  recommended  for 
brevet  by  the  colonel  of  his  regiment  in  1867,  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  during  the  war;  but  not  acted 
on  by  the  Senate  of  the  United  States  owing  to  the  order 
of  [867,  suspending  the  granting  of  brevets. 

Captain  Cusick  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the 
Thirteenth  Infantry  June  20,  1866;  transferred  to  the 
Thirty-first  Infantry  September  20.  1866;  transferred  to 
the  Twenty-second  Infantry  May  15,  1869;  promoted 
first  lieutenant  August  5,  1872,  and  captain  January  1. 
[888.  He  joined  his  regiment  in  the  West  and  aided  in 
repelling  an  attack  on  Fort  Stevenson,  North  Dakota,  by 
hostile  Sioux  Indians  August,  1867  ;  repulsed  a  night  attack 
<  if  train  escort  "by  hostile  Sioux  Indians  near  Spring  Lake, 
North  Dakota,  July  2~,  186S;  engaged  with  one  hundred 
and  seventy-five  hostile  Sioux  Indians  under  Sitting  Bull, 
near  Fort  Buford,  Montana,  August  20,  [868;  captured 
Little  Running  Bear,  a  Brule  Sioux  Indian,  an  associate 
of  Sitting  Bull,  fanuary,  1869.  who  was  killed  shortly 
afterwards  while  attempting  to  escape;  engaged  with 
a  band  of  Indians  under  Crazy  Horse,  near  Wolf  Moun- 
tain, Montana,  January  8-9,  1877:  May  7—8,  1877, 
engaged  with  band  of  hostile  Sioux  Indians  under 
Lame  Deer;  capture  of  lour  hundred  horses  and  camp 
destroyi  1 

Captain  Cusick'  was  appointed  by  Director-General 
Davis,  of  the  World's  Columbian  Exposition,  as  honorary 
and  special  assistant  in  the  Department  of  American  Ar- 
y  and  Ethnology  September  jj,  1891.  Upon 
his  own  request,  1  aptain  (  usick  was  honorably  retired 
from  active  service  January  14,  1892. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


1 1 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL   AND    BREVET    MAJOR-GEN- 
ERAL GEORGE   A.  CUSTER,  U.S.A.   (deceased). 

Lieutenant-Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General 
George  A.  Custer  was  born  in  Ohio.  lie  graduated  at 
the  Military  Academy  June  24,  1861,  and  was  promoted 
se  ond  lieutenant  of  the  Second  Cavalry- the  same  day. 
He  was  detailed  to  drill  volunteers  at  Washington,  and 
then  participated  in  the  battle  of  first  Bull  Run,  July  21, 
[861.  He  was  absent,  sick',  from  October,  1861,  to  Feb- 
ruary, 1862,  and  then  participated  in  the  Peninsula  cam- 
paign of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in 
the  siege  of  Yorktown.  He  was  promoted  first  lieuten- 
ant Fifth  Cavalry  July  17,  1862,  and  captain  of  stall 
(additional  aide  de-camp)  June  5,  1862,  and  served  on 
the  staff  of  Major-General  McClellan  in  September  and 
October,  1862,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  South 
Mountain  and  Antietam.  He  participated  in  Stoneman's 
raid  towards  Richmond,  aide-de-camp  to  General  Pleas- 
onton  in  combat  at  Brand}-  Station,  and  on  June  29, 
1863,  he  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers. 
As  such,  lie  commanded  a  cavalry  brigade  in  the  Pennsyl- 
vania campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  the  action  at  Aldie, 
battle  of  Gettysburg,  various  skirmishes  in  pursuit  of  the 
enemy,  with  constant  fighting  at  Monterey,  Smithsburg, 
I  Iagerstown,  Williamsport,  and  Boonsborough  ;  in  fact, 
from  this  time  to  the  end  of  the  war  his  history  is  that  of 
the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  the  actions  in  which  he- 
was  engaged  are  so  numerous  that  it  would  require  the 
space  of  this  entire  sketch  to  enumerate  them.  He  com- 
manded a  brigade  of  cavalry  in  the  Richmond  campaign, 
cavalry  corps  in  the  Shenandoah  campaign  with  Sheri- 
dan, and  a  division  of  cavalry  in  the  Appomattox  cam- 
paign of  1865,  and  was  present  at  the  capitulation  of 
General  Lee  April  5,  1865.  He  then  made  a  raid  to 
Dan  River,  North  Carolina,  from  April  24  to  May  3, 
1S65,  and  was  in  command  of  a  cavalry  division  in  the 
Military  Division  of  the  Southwest  from  June  3  to  July 
17.  1865. 

General  Custer  was  appointed  major-general  of  volun- 
teers April  15,  1865,  and  was  brevetted  in  the  regular 
army,  major,  for  Gettysburg,  July  '3,  1863;  lieutenant- 
colonel,  for  Yellow  Tavern;  colonel,  for  Winchester;] 
brigadier-general,  for  Five  Forks;  major-general,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  services  during  the  campaign 
ending  in  the  surrender  of  the  insurgent  army  of  North- 
ern Virginia.  He  was  also  brevetted  a  major-general  of 
United  States  Volunteers,  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious 
services  at  the  battles  of  Winchester  and  Fisher's  Hill,  ; 
Virginia." 


He  served  in  the  Military  Division  of  the  Gulf  from 
July  17  to  November  13,  1865,  and  was  chief  of  cavalry 
of  the  Department  of  Texas  to  February  1 ,  1 866,  at  which 
time  he  was  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service.  He 
was  then  granted  leave  of  absence,  and  was  awaiting 
orders  to  September  24,  1866,  when  he  was  placed  on 
frontier  duty  at  Fort  Riley,  Kansas,  October  16, 
1866. 

General  Custer  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the 
Seventh  Cavalry  July  28,  1S66,  and  served  on  the  plains; 
in  campaign  against  the  Sioux  ami  Cheyennes,  on  the 
South  Platte  and  Republican  Rivers,  1867-68;  various 
other  expeditions,  scouts,  and  combats,  and  notably  the 
Big  Horn  and  Yellowstone  expedition  of  1876,  where  he 
and  his  gallant  band  were  all  massacred  in  the  fight  with 
Sitting  Bull's  village  on  the  Little  Big  Horn  River, 
Montana.  The  closing  scene  in  Custer's  history  has 
been  described  by  Horned  Horse,  an  old  Sioux  chief,  as 
follows  :  "  Custer  then  sought  to  lead  his  men  up  to  the 
bluffs  by  a  diagonal  movement,  all  of  them  having  dis- 
mounted and  firing,  whenever  they  could,  over  the  backs 
of  their  horses  at  the  Indians,  who  had  by  that  time 
crossed  the  river  in  thousands,  mostly  on  foot,  and  had 
taken  Custer  in  flank  and  rear,  while  others  annoyed  him 
by  a  galling  fire  from  across  the  river.  Hemmed  in  on 
all  sides,  the  troops  fought  steadily,  but  the  fire  of  the 
enemy  was  so  close  and  rapid  that  they  melted  like  snow 
before  it,  and  fell  dead  among  their  horses  in  heaps. 
The  firing  was  continuous  until  the  last  man  of  Custer's 
command  was  dead.  The  water-course,  in  which  most 
of  the  soldiers  died,  ran  with  bl 1 


IS 


H4 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR    AND    BREVET    LIEUTENANT-COLONEL 
AARON    S.   DAGGETT,   U.S.A. 

Majok  \\i>  Brevet  Lieutenant-Colonel  Aaron  S. 
Daggi  i  i  (Thirteenth  Infantry)  was  born  in  Maine  June 
14,  1839.  Heistheson  of  Aaron  and  Dorcas  (Dearborn) 
I  laggett,  and  married  Rose,  the  daughter  of  Major-Gen- 
eral Phillips  Bradford,  of  Turner,  a  lineal  descendant  of 
Governor  William  Bradford,  of  Plymouth  County. 

At  the  breaking  out  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  Major 
Daggetl  enlisted  as  a  private  April  29,  1861,  and  was 
commissioned  second  lieutenant  May  1,  1 861.  lie  was 
promoted  first  lieutenant  of  Company  E,  Fifth  Maine 
Infantry,  May  24,  and  captain  of  the  company  August  4, 
[861. 

from  the  first  engagement  of  the  regiment  (battle 
oi  first  Bull  Run)  to  the  end  of  its  three  years' memo- 
rable service,  Captain  Daggett  did  faithful  duty,  and 
was  promoted  major  April  14,  [B63,  and  on  January 
[8,  [865,  was  commissioned  lieutenant  coloi  i  of  the 
Fifth  Regimenl  U.  S.  Veteran  Volunteers  (Hancock's 
Corps). 

(  olonel  Daggett  was  brevetted  colonel  and  brigadier- 
general  of  volunteers  March  2,  [867,  for  "gallant  and 
meritorious  services  during  the  war,"  and  received  the 
brevets  of  major  L:.  S.  Army  for  "gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  at  the  battle  of  Rappahannock  Station, 
Virginia,  November  7,  [863,"  and  lieutenant  colonel  for 

lllanl  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  the 
Wilderness,  Virginia." 

Immediately  alter  the  battle  of  Rappahannock  Station, 
the  captured  trophies — flags,  cannon,  etc. — were  es<  orted 
to  General  Meade's  head-quarters,  Colonel  Daggett  bein<* 
in  command  of  the  battalion  of  his  brigade,  he  having 
been  chosen  by  General  Upton,  the  escort  b  1  ted 

from  those  who  had  taken  the  most  conspicuous  part  in 


that  battle.     General  Upton  wrote  as  follows  regarding 
Colonel  Daggett : 

"  In  the  assault  at  Rappahannock  Station,  Colonel 
Daggett's  regiment  captured  over  five  hundred  prisoners. 
In  the  assault  at  Spottsylvania  Court-House,  May  10,  his 
regiment  lost  six  out  of  seven  captains,  the  seventh  being 
killed  on  the  12th  of  May  at  'the  angle,'  or  the  point 
where  the  tree  was  shot  down  by  musketry,  on  which 
ground  the  regiment  fought  from  9.30  A.  M.  until  5.30  P.  M., 
when  it  was  relieved.  On  all  these  occasions  Colonel 
Daggett  was  under  my  immediate  command,  and  fought 
with  distinguished  braver)-.  Throughout  his  military 
career  in  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  he  maintained  the 
character  of  a  good  soldier  and  an  upright  man,  and  his 
promotion  would  be  but  a  simple  act  of  justice,  which 
would  be  commended  by  all  those  who  desire  to  see 
courage  rewarded." 

In  recommending  him  to  Governor  Corry  for  promo- 
tion, General  Upton  said  : 

"  Major  Daggett  served  his  full  term  in  this  brigade 
with  honor  both  to  himself  and  State,  and  won  the  repu- 
tation of  being  a  brave,  reliable,  and  efficient  officer.  His 
promotion  would  be  a  great  benefit  to  the  service,  while 
the  honor  of  the  State  could  scarcely  be  intrusted  to 
safer  hands." 

Generals  Meade,  Wright,  and  Russell  concurred  in 
this  recommendation. 

General  W.  S.  Hancock  also  recommended  him  for  pro- 
motion. He  was  twice  slightly  wounded  during  the  war. 
Colonel  Daggett  was  appointed  a  captain  in  the  Six- 
teenth U.  S.  Infantry  Jul)'  28,  1866;  was  transferred  to 
the  Second  Infantry  April  17,  1869;  was  promoted  major 
January  2,  1892,  and  assigned  to  the  Thirteenth  Infantry. 
He  was  not  an  applicant  for  a  position  in  the  regular 
army.  The  appointment  was  made  without  solicitation, 
by  recommendation  of  General  Grant.  In  the  regular 
arm)-  he  has  won  the  reputation  of  being  a  fine  tactician, 
and  also  of  being  well  versed  in  military  law. 

(  olonel  Daggett  is  not  only  a  soldier,  but  has  ability 
ouside  of  his  profession.  As  a  public  speaker,  the  fol- 
lowing is  said  by  the  Rev.  S.  S.  Cummings,  of  Boston: 
"  It  was  my  privilege  and  pleasure  to  listen  to  an  address 
delivered  by  General  A.  S.  Daggett  on  Memorial  Day 
of  1891.  I  had  anticipated  something  able  and  instruc- 
tive, but  it  far  exceeded  my  fondest  expectations.  .  .  . 
The  address  was  dignified,  yet  affable,  delivered  in  choice 
language  without  manuscript,  instructive  and  impressive, 
and  highly  appreciated  by  an  intelligent  audience." 

A  Vinton  (Iowa)  paper,  August,  18S9,  thus  says  of 
Colonel  Daggett:  "In  the  evening  a  very  interesting 
programme  was  carried  out  in  front  of  regimental  head- 
quarters, it  being  music  and  speaking  combined.  .  .  . 
Colonel  Daggett  proves  to  be  an  eloquent  orator  as  well 
as  a  good  soldier." 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


115 


REAR-ADMIRAL  JOHN  A.  DAHLGREN,  U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Rear-Admiral  John  A.  Da?ilgren  was  born  in  Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania,  and  appointed  midshipman  from 
that  State  in  1826,  serving  in  the  Brazil  and  the  Mediter- 
ranean  Squadrons,  in  the  "  Macedonian"  and  "Ontario;" 
passed  midshipman  in  April,  1832,  and  was  on  duty  on 
the  Coast  Survey  until  1842;  commissioned  as  lieutenant 
in  March,  1S37;  served  in  the  frigate  "Cumberland,"  in 
the  Mediterranean,  during  1844-45.  Prom  1847  to  1857 
he  was  upon  ordnance  duty,  during  which  time  he  per- 
fected the  invention  of  the  famous  Dahlgren  heavy  guns, 
introduced  howitzers  for  use  afloat  and  ashore,  and  wrote 
several  works  relating  to  ordnance.  In  September,  1855, 
he  was  commissioned  as  commander;  commanded  the 
ordnance  practice-ship  "Plymouth"  in  1858-59,  and  was 
on  ordnance  duty  at  the  Washington  Navy-Yard  in 
1860-61.  At  this  time  his  guns  were  in  general  use  in 
the  navy,  and  there  were  never  better  or  more  reliable 
ones  of  their  kind. 

On  April  22,  1861,  a  few  daws  after  the  attack  of  the 
Baltimore  mob  on  the  Massachusetts  troops,  all  the 
officers  of  the  Washington  Navy-Yard  resigned  and  left, 
except  Commander  Dahlgren,  Lieutenant  Wainwright 
(  who  was  absent  on  sick-leave),  and  the  boatswain.  The 
officers  who  thus  left  were  a  commodore-commandant,  a 
commander,  two  lieutenants,  the  surgeon,  and  paymas- 
ter.  The  command  devolved  upon  Dahlgren,  who  took 
vigorous  measures  to  defend  the  navy-yard.  After  the 
immediate  emergency  passed  away,  it  was  suggested  that 
the  law  required  that  a  captain  should  command  a  navy- 
yard,  and  applications  were  made  for  his  position,  but 
the  President  refused  to  disturb  him,  and  Congress  passed 
an  act  enabling  him  to  retain  the  command.  Commis- 
sioned captain  June  16,  1862,  and  shortly  afterwards 
appointed  chief  of  the  Bureau  of  Ordnance.  Promoted 
to  rear-admiral  February  7,  1863,  and  relieved  Rear- 
Admiral  Dupont,  in  the  command  of  the  South  Atlantic 
Blockading  Squadron,  Jul}-  6  of  that  year.  A  com- 
bined operation  of  naval  and  army  forces,  the  latter 
under  General  Gillmore,  was  then  begun  for  the  posses- 
sion of  Morris  Island,  on  the  south  side  of  the  entrance 
to  Charleston. 

After  a  long  and  severe  struggle  the  island  was 
finally  possessed,  and  the  guns  of  the  army  and  the 
fleet  soon  reduced  Fort  Sumter  to  a  pile  of  ruins.  The 
fort  itself  was  assaulted  by  a  boat  expedition  which 
failed.     But  Dahlgren's  fleet  thenceforth  remained  inside 


the  bar  and  blockade-running  at  that  port  was  at  an  end. 
In  Pebruary,  1864,  Admiral  Dahlgren  commanded  in 
person  an  expedition  to  the  St.  John's  River.  In  July, 
1864,  a  concerted  movement  was  made  up  the  Stono 
River  by  General  Foster  and  Admiral  Dahlgren.  This 
expedition,  well  conceived,  failed  for  want  of  energetic 
carrying  out  on  the  part  of  some  of  the  army  subordinates. 
The  column  under  Colonel  Hoyt  actually  captured  Fort 
Johnson,  but,  being  unsupported,  were  made  prisoners. 
On  December  12,  1864,  General  Sherman  having  success- 
fully accomplished  his  march  to  the  sea,  reached  the 
vicinity  of  Savannah,  and  Admiral  Dahlgren  immediately 
established  communication  with  him,  and  made  the  best 
possible  disposition  of  the  vessels  under  his  command 
to  assist  the  army  in  taking  possession  of  Savannah, 
which  was  occupied  by  Sherman  on  December  21,  1864. 
On  February  18,  1865,  the  movements  of  Sherman's 
army  caused  the  evacuation  of  Charleston  by  the  Con- 
federate forces,  and  Admiral  Dahlgren  at  once  moved 
his  vessels  up  and  occupied  that  city.  The  evacuation  of 
Charleston  was  followed  by  that  of  Georgetown,  and 
on  February  26  the  admiral  occupied  that  place.  <  >n 
March  1,  immediately  after  the  surrender,  his  flag-ship 
was  blown  up  by  a  torpedo  and  sunk.  In  1866  Rear- 
Admiral  Dahlgren  was  ordered  to  the  command  of  the 
South  Pacific  Squadron.  On  returning  from  that  ser- 
vice, in  1868,  he  was  for  the  second  time  appointed  chief 
of  the  Bureau  of  Ordnance.  In  the  fall  of  1869  he  was 
relieved  from  the  charge  of  that  bureau  at  his  own 
request,  and  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  Washington 
Navy-Yard,  where  he  died  in  1S70. 


n6 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


COMMANDER  WM.  STARR  DANA,  U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Commander  Wiiliam  Starr  Dana  was  born  in  New 
York  April,  1843;  and  was  the  son  of  Richard  P.  Dana, 
win isc  ancestor  Richard  came  from  England  to  Massa- 
chusetts in  1640.  Many  of  the  members  of  the  family 
have  since  been  well  known  in  the  literary  and  scientific 
world.  Commander  Dana  entered  the  Naval  Academy  in 
1859,  ami  graduated  in  [863,  becoming  an  ensign  in  the 
same  year.  After  a  short  service  in  the  North  Atlantic 
Squadron,  he  was  ordered  to  the  West  Gulf  Squadron. 
Was  attached  to  the  flag-ship  "  Hartford"  at  the  battle 
of  Mobile  Bay,  and  participated  in  all  the  events, — the 
taking  ol  Forts  Morgan,  Gaines;  and  Powell  and  other 
operations  of  that  epoch  of  the  Civil  War.  lie  was 
of  those  who  received  the  thanks  of  Admiral  Far- 
it  ;  and  was  included  in  the  thanks  of  Congre  voted 
to  the  "officers,  seamen,  and  marines  of  the  fleet,  for  the 
unsurpassed  gallantry  and  skill  exhibited  by  them  in  the 
engagement  in  .Mobile  Bay  on  the  5th  day  of  August, 
[864."  After  the  close  nf  the  war  Commander  Dana 
was  executive-officer  of  the  "Shenandoah,"  1879-81, — 
the  flag-ship  of  Rear- Admiral  Andrew  Bryson,  on  the 
South  Atlantic  Squadron.  For  two  months,  pending  a 
change  ol  captains,  he  was  in  command  of  the  "Shen- 
andoah."    When  the  inspection  of  the  ship  was  made. 


upon  the  new  captain  taking  command  he  reported  that 
the  condition  of  the  ship  bore  testimony  to  the  vigilance 
and  industry  of  those  in  authority, — "as  near  perfection 
as  the  exertions  of  the  officers  and  crew  could  arrive  at 
with  the  armament  furnished  by  the  government."  Rear- 
Admiral  Bryson  endorsed  the  report  very  favorably, 
mentioning  that  Dana's  "best  energies  have  been  given, 
as  the  executive,  to  the  well-being  of  the  vessel." 

He  was  regarded  as  having  most  seamanlike  qualities, 
and  was  favorably  regarded  for  the  order  and  discipline 
of  the  vessels  in  which  he  served.  The  late  Admiral 
Nicholson,  who  was  a  competent  judge  in  such  matters, 
said,  "He,"  Dana,  "was  a  conscientious,  painstaking 
officer." 

Commander  Dana  was  for  a  time  a  companion  ol  the 
Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion  of  the  United  States, 
lie  was  also  a  member  of  the  Academy  of  Sciences  of 
New  York. 

In  1889  he  obtained  .1  few  months'  leave  of  absence 
for  the  purpose  of  European  travel,  and  was  on  his  way 
home  when  he  was  taken  with  pneumonia,  in  Paris,  and 
died  there  on  January  1,  1890. 

After  his  service  with  Admiral  Farragut  in  the  "  Hart- 
Cud,"  he  served  on  the  Pacific  Station,  being  promoted 
to  master  while  attached  to  "St.  Mary's."  "Aroostook," 
of  Asiatic  Squadron,  [866-68,  and  promoted  lieutenant 
while  serving  in  her.  In  the  "Shenandoah,"  on  same 
station,  when  promoted  to  lieutenant-commander;  and 
then  served  in  "Ashuelot."  Attached  to  "Brooklyn" 
and  "Plymouth,"  of  the  European  Squadron,  1870-75. 
Executive-officer  of  "  (  Issipee,"  in  the  West  Indies,- 
1874-75.  Executive-officer  of  receiving-ship  "Colo- 
rado," 1875-77.  In  1878  he  took  a  course  of  tor- 
pedo instruction  at  Newport.  From  1879  to  1881  he 
was  attached  to  "  Shenandoah,"  as  already  mentioned. 

Commissioned  commander  September,  1881.  After 
some  duty  at  the  New  York  Navy-Yard,  and  in  com- 
mand of  torpedo-boat  "Alarm,"  he  made  a  cruise  in 
command  of  the  "  Nipsic,"  South  Atlantic  Squadron, 
returning  home  in  June,  1886.  His  next  station  was 
the  Naval  War  College,  during  a  course  lasting  some 
weeks,  in  18S7.  In  [888  he  took  another  course  at  the 
Torpedo  Instruction,  and  after  that  was  ordered  to  duty 
at  the  Naval  War  College,  Newport,  from  August  to 
November,  1888,     This  terminated  his  active  service. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


117 


CAPTAIN  AND   BRHVET  MAJOR  JOHN  A.  DARLING, 

U.S.A. 

Captain  and  Brevet  Major  John  A.  Darling  (First 
U.  S.  Artillery)  was  born  at  Bucksport,  Maine,  June  7, 
1835.  His  ancestors  settled  in  New  England  in  1632, 
and  were  ever  quick  to  respond  to  all  calls  for  support 
from  the  colonies  and  republic,  rendering  distinguished 
services.  Major  Darling  graduated  at  the  State  Military 
Academy  of  Pennsylvania;  was  commissioned  second 
lieutenant  in  Second  U.  S.  Artillery,  August  5,  1861. 

Ilis  first  service  was  at  Fort  McHenry.  In  the  au- 
tumn of  1861  he  was  ordered  to  Sedalia,  Missouri,  to 
command  Light  Battery  F  of  his  regiment,  well  known 
as  "  Totten's  Battery." 

In  the  exceptionally  severe  winter  of  1862,  he  marched, 
with  his  command,  to  St.  Louis  Arsenal,  a  distance  of 
three  hundred  miles,  arriving  in  February  after  a  month's 
march.  From  there  he  proceeded  at  once  to  New  Mad- 
rid, Missouri,  and  was  engaged  in  active  operations  both 
there  and  at  Island  No.  10,  resulting  in  their  capture. 

In  addition  to  the  command  of  his  battery,  he  was 
specially  detailed,  in  charge  of  two  companies  of  volun- 
teer engineer  troops,  to  make  gabions  and  fascines  and  to 
construct  a  field-work. 

General  Pope  in  his  report  says,  "  Lieutenant  Darling's 
battery,  Second  Artillery,  U.S.A.,  was  frequently  under 
the  enemy's  fire,  and  behaved  in  a  very  gallant  and 
creditable  manner." 

Having  been  promoted  to  a  first  lieutenancy,  he  was 
appointed  aide-de-camp  to  Major-General  John  A.  Dix. 
While  on  this  duty  he  made  the  first  exchange  of  war 
prisoners,  being  associated  with  Judge  Ould,  commis- 
sioner of  the  Confederate  States.  He  was  also  engaged 
in  actual  field-service  before  Suffolk,  Virginia, and  on  the 
Peninsula.  In  March,  1863,  was  appointed  major  of 
Pennsylvania  Heavy  Artillery.  Commanded  regiment 
and  Camp  Hamilton,  Virginia,  until  June.  Prom  there 
transferred  to  duty  at  Port  Monroe,  Virginia,  till  Oc- 
tober, 1864.  At  this  date,  having  been  detailed  as  acting 
assistant  inspector-general  for  the  Eastern  District  of 
Virginia,  he  served  until  June,  1865,  in  that  capacity. 
Upon  being  relieved  and  returned  to  his  regiment  at 
Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  he  remained  there  until  Septem- 
ber, 1865.  During  July  and  August,  1865,  he  held  as 
prisoners  in  close  confinement  President  Jefferson  Davis, 
Senator  C.  C.  Clay,  and  Editor  John  Mitchell  (the  Irish 
refugee),  of  the  Southern  Confederacy. 

Brevetted  captain  and  major  for  "  gallant  and  meritori- 
ous services,"  he  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the  vol- 
unteer service,  and  ordered  to  join  his  regular  regiment, 
the  Second  U.  S.  Artillery,  at  Alcatraz  Island,  San  Fran- 
cisco harbor,  where  he  remained  until  December,  1S67, 
commanding  the  post  from  July,  1866. 

Placed  in  command  of  the  post  and  his  battery  at  Fort 


Point  San  Jose,  San  PYancisco,  he  remained  there  until 
February,  186S.  Was  promoted  captain  to  date  from 
December  9,  1 S6/. 

Removed  to  Fort  Stevens,  Oregon,  he  commanded  the 
post  and  battery  there  until  January,  1S71. 

Upon  the  reduction  of  the  army  in  January,  1871,  he  was 
honorably  mustered  out  of  the  service.  By  special  act  of 
Congress  he  was  recommissioned  as  captain  of  artillery, 
with  former  rank  and  date  of  commission,  and  assigned 
to  the  First  U.  S.  Artillery.  The  following  is  an  extract 
from  the  united  report  of  the  Senate  and  House  Commit- 
tees on  Military  Affairs,  unanimously  adopted  by  both 
bodies:  "  His  record  during  the  war  is  that  of  a  gallant, 
faithful,  and  efficient  officer,  who  was  constantly  in  the 
field,  having  command  of  artillery  in  active  operations  in 
Missouri,  at  New  Madrid,  Island  No.  10,  and,  later,  in 
the  campaigns  in  Virginia.  At  the  conclusion  of  the 
war  he  was  brevetted  captain  and  major  for  gallant  and 
meritorious  conduct." 

From  May,  1878,  to  July,  1879,  he  was  on  duty  at  the 
Artillery  School  at  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia.  Ordered  to 
Fort  Trumbull,  Connecticut,  in  July,  1879,  he  commanded 
Battery  M,  First  U.  S.  Artillery,  at  that  point  until 
November,  1881.  Commanded  post  of  Fort  Mason,  San 
Francisco,  until  February,  1889,  nearly  eight  years.  He 
was  then  removed  to  the  Presidio  of  San  Francisco,  re- 
maining until  April,  1889.  Ordered  to  Alcatraz  Island, 
San  Francisco  harbor,  he  was  on  duty  with  his  battery 
until  May,  1890.  At  that  date  his  regiment  was  ordered 
east,  and  he  has  been,  up  to  the  present  time,  in  command 
of  his  batter)-  at  Governor's  Island,  New  York  harbor. 

Major  Darling  is  well  known  in  the  musical  world  as 
August  Mignon,  under  which  nom  de  plume  have  been 
published,  both  in  this  country  and  in  Europe,  many 
vocal  and  instrumental  compositions  of  acknowledged 
hi<>h  artistic  merit. 


n.S 


OFF/ CURS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (.regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL  CHARLES  HENRY   DAMS.  I  I.S.N. 

(hi  CI   \S\  D). 

R  i  vr-Admirai  Cii  \rles  Henry  Davis,  son  of  1  )aniel 
Davis,  Solicitor-General  of  Massachusetts,  was  born  in 
Boston  January  [6,  1S07.  He  entered  Harvard  College 
in  [821,  and  on  August  ij,  [823,  was  appointed  mid- 
shipman in  the  navy.  1 1  i ^  first  cruise  was  in  the  Pacific, 
mi  board  the  frigate"  United  States,"  under  Commodore 
Isaac  Hull.  He  served  temporarily  on  board  the 
schooner  "  Dolphin,"  on  a  cruise  to  the  Mulgrave  Isl- 
ands, in  search  11I  the  mutineers  oi  the  whale-ship 
"Globe." 

He  was  attached  to  the  sloop  "Erie,"  in  the  West  In- 
dies, in  [828  ;  passed  his  examination  in  [829,  taking  high 
rank  in  his  class;  served  as  sailing-master  of  the  "<  )nta- 
rin,"  in  the  Mediterranean,  until  (832 ;  was  commissi,  med 
lieutenant  in  [ 83 1  ;  sailed  in  the  "  Yinccnncs"  as  flag- 
lieutenant  to  Commodore  Alexander  Wadsworth,  in  [833, 
1  hi  the  I'.u  it'n  Station;  returned  to  the  United  States  in 
[835  in  command  of  the  American  hark  "Vermont," 
which  had  been  condemned  at  Callao;  and  from  [837  to 
1840  he  served  on  hoard  the  razee  "Independence,"  in 
Europe,  and  on  the  Brazil  Station.  In  1 840  he  began  the 
serious  study  oi  mathematics.  He  was  attached  to  the 
Coast  Survey  from  [842  to  [849.  During  this  period  he 
discovered  Davis'  New  South  Shoal,  lying  off  Nantucket 
Shoals,  and  published  his  paper,  on  the  Geological 
Action  of  the  Tidal  and  other  Currents  oi  the  Ocean, 
and  mi  the  Law  of  Deposit  of  the  Flood-tide,  which 
gave  him  reputation  as  a  hydrographer  of  skill.  II 
served    on    several    harbor   commissions.     In     [849    he 

iblished   the    Nautical    Almanac,  and    became   its    first 

superintendent.    Commander    in     [854,     he    commanded 

the  "  St.  Mary's,"  in  the  Pacific,  1856   59,      I  [e  raised  the 

ol   Rivas,  and  received  the  surrender  of  Walker, 


the  filibuster,  thereby  saving  his  life,  and  took  him  out  of 
Nicaragua.  In  1  857  he  published  a  translation  of  Gauss's 
" Theoria  Motus  Corporum  Ccelestium."  This  was  the 
first  presentation  in  English  of  this  standard  authority 
for  astronomers.  In  [861  he  was  member  of  the  Hoard 
on  Construction  of  New  Vessels,  and  of  the  Commission 
on  Southern  Harbors,  which  planned  the  expedition  to 
Port  Royal,  in  which  he  sailed  as  fleet-captain,  under 
Dupont. 

In  May,  [862,  having  been  promoted  to  captain, 
he  relieved  flag-officer  Foote,  in  command  of  the  Mis- 
sissippi Flotilla,  off  Fort  Pillow.  A  few  days  after  as- 
suming command,  he,  with  seven  vessels,  beat  oil  a 
squadron  of  eight  iron-clads  in  an  action  lasting  an  hour, 
the  enemy's  vessels  avoiding  capture  under  the  guns  oi 
Fort  Pillow.  On  June  5  Fort  Pillow  was  evacuated,  and 
on  the  6th  Davis  brought  on  a  general  action  with  the 
Confederate  iron  dads  and  rams  off  Memphis,  won  a 
signal  victory,  and  received  the  surrender  of  the  city, 
lie  then  joined  Farragut,  and  was  engaged  in  operations 
near  Vicksburg  and  on  the  Yazoo  River  until  Septem- 
ber, when  he  was  forced,  through  ill  health,  to  relinquish 
his  command.  He  was  made  rear-admiral  in  [863,  and 
became  the  first  chief  of  the  Bureau  of  Navigation,  and 
in  1865  was  appointed  superintendent  of  the  Naval 
Observatory.  In  [867  he  hoisted  his  flag  on  board 
the  "  Guerriere,"  as  commander-in-chief  of  the  Brazil 
Station. 

During  this  cruise  he  proceeded  in  force  to  Paraguay 
and  demanded  and  obtained  the  surrender  of  two  per- 
sons, one  an  American  and  the  other  a  British  subject, 
who  had  claimed  protection  of  the  American  legation, 
and  had  been  arrested  by  Lopez,  when  the  minister  left 
the  country.  Phis  action  involved  Davis  in  a  contro- 
versy with  the  ministers  to  Brazil  and  Paraguay,  in  which 
he  was  sustained  by  the  Department.  A  congressional 
investigation  followed,  in  which  he  was  vindicated.  He 
commanded  the  Norfolk  Navy- Yard  [870-73.  In  1  S74 
he  was  again  appointed  superintendent  ol  the  Observ- 
atory, at  which  post  he  died  February  18,  [877. 
Admiral  Davis  took  the  degree  of  A.  B.  at  Harvard,  and 
was  made  LL.D.  by  the  same  University  in  1868.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences,  of 
the  American  Academy  of  Arts  and  Sciences,  of  the 
Massachusetts  branch  of  the  Society  of  the  Cincin- 
nati, and  of  the  Military  <  )rder  of  the  Loyal  Legion,  and 
was  the  author  of  many  writings  on  scientific  and  other 
subjects.  He  received  the  thanks  of  Congress  and  his 
rear-admiral's  commission  for  his  victories  at  Fort  Pillow 
and  Memphis. 

A  stained-glass  window  in  the  Memorial  Hall,  at  Har- 
vard, commemorates  the  fact  that  he  was  the  oldest  repre- 
entative  of  the  University,  and  the  senior  in  rank-,  who 
served  during  the  Civil  War. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


•'9 


COLONEL  JEFFERSON  C.  DAVIS.  U.S.A. 
(deceased). 

Colonel  Jefferson  C.  Davis  was  born  in  Indiana, 
and  appointed  from  the  army.  He  was  a  private  in  the 
Third  Indiana  Volunteer  Infantry  June,  1S46  ;  engaged  in 
Taylor's  campaigns  against  Monterey  and  Saltillo,  and 
the  battle  of  Buena  Vista,  Mexico;  sergeant  Third  In- 
diana Volunteer  Infantry  February,  1 S47  ;  second  lieu- 
tenant First  LT.  S.  Artillery  June,  1848.  He  joined 
the  regiment  at  Fort  McHenry  October,  1848,  and  was 
at  Fort  Washington,  Maryland,  and  on  the  coast  of 
Mississippi  until  the  fall  of  1852.  First  lieutenant  First 
U.  S.  Artillery  February,  1852,  and  in  Florida  in  1853. 
lb- was  at  Fortress  Monroe,  Virginia,  until  the  fall  of 
1855  with  a  light  battery  ;  at  Fort  McHenry  to  [857; 
on  the  east  coast  of  Florida  to  summer  of  1858,  and  at 
Fort  Moultrie,  South  Carolina,  till  December,  l86l,when 
it  was  evacuated  and  Fort  Sumter  occupied.  Engaged 
in  the  defence  of  Fort  Sumter,  South  Carolina.  He  was 
mi  staff  duty,  mustering  and  equipping  troops  for  the 
field,  Indianapolis,  from  May  to  August,  1 861.  Captain 
First  U.  S.  Artillery  May,  1861  ;  colonel  Indiana  Volun- 
teer Infantry  August,  [861  ;  commanding  forces  holding 
Jefferson  City,  Lexington,  and  Boonville;  commanding 
brigade  in  the  Army  of  the  Southwest,  and  at  the  action 
of  Springfield,  Missouri  ;  commanding  Camp  of  Instruc- 
tion at  Otterville,  Missouri.  I  Ie  commanded  the  forces 
engaged  in  the  defeat  and  capture  of  the  rebels  on  the 
Blackwater,  Missouri,  December,  1861.  Commanded  a 
di\  ision  and  was  engaged  in  the  action  at  Springfield  and 
pursuit  of  Price.  Commanded  the  troops  in  the  action  at 
Cross  Timbers,  Arkansas,  and  participated  in  the  battle 
of  Pea  Ridge,  Arkansas.  lie  was  in  command  of  a 
division  at  the  siege  of  Corinth,  and  in  the  pursuit  of 
the  enemy  to  Boonville.  Made  brigadier-general  U.  S. 
Volunteers  May,  1862,  to  rank  from  December,  1861. 
Commanded  troops  in  the  engagement  at  Nolensville  and 
Nole  Gap  in  the  advance  on  Murfreesborough.  He  was 
at  the  battle  of  Stone  River,  and  commanded  the  forces 
in  pursuit  of  the  rebel  General  Wheeler.  In  the  cam- 
paign against  Tullahoma  and  Chattanooga;  engaged  at 
action  of  Liberty  Gap,  battles  of  Chickamauga,  Mis- 
sionary Ridge,  pursuit  of  the  rebels;  actions  of  Chicka- 
mauga Station  and  Shepard's  Farm  ;  expedition  for  the 
relief  of  Knoxville;  reconnoissance  at  Dalton;  action  of 
Buzzard's  Roost  (commanding  forces) ;  advance  on  At- 
lanta, battle  of  Resaca,  capture  of  Rome  ;  actions  around 
Dallas,  assault  on  Kenesaw  Mountain,  and  capture  of 
Marietta;    in    the    actions   of   Nicojack    Creek,    Chatta- 


hoochie  River,  battle  of  Peach-Tree  Creels',  and  oper- 
ations around  Atlanta,  Georgia.  Brevet  major-general 
U.  S.  Volunteers  August,  [864;  commanding  Fourteenth 
Arms'  Corps;  engaged  at  the  battle  and  occupation  ot 
fonesborough  ;  pursuit  of  the  rebel  General  Hood  in  rear 
of  .Atlanta.  He  was  in  Sherman's  march  to  the  sea  and 
through  the  Carolinas,  being  engaged  at  the  capture  of  Sa- 
vannah, Georgia;  battles  of  Averysborough  and  Benton- 
ville,  capture  of  Raleigh,  and  surrender  of  the  rebel  army 
under  General  Johnston.  In  the  march  to  Washington 
City  via  Richmond,  Virginia,  and  transported  the  Four- 
teenth Corps  to  Louisville,  Kentucky,  when  it  was  mus- 
tered out  of  service  fuly  and  August,  1865  ;  commanded 
Department  of  Kentucky  1866;  commanded  expedition 
to  occupy  Alaska,  and  in  command  of  Department  of 
Alaska  September,  1867,  to  August,  1870.  Brevet  major 
U.  S.  Army  for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  at  the 
battle  of  Rome,  Georgia;  brevet  colonel  U.  S.  Army  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Pea 
Ridge,  Arkansas;  brevet  lieutenant-colonel  U.  S.  Army 
for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Res- 
aca,  Georgia;  brevet  colonel  I7.  S.  Army  for  gallant  and 
meritorious  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Rome,  Georgia; 
brevet  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army  for  gallant  and  mer- 
itorious conduct  at  the  battle  of  Kenesaw  Mountain, 
Georgia;  brevet  major-general  U.S.  Army  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Jonesborough, 
Georgia.  Colonel  Twenty-third  U.  S.  Infantry  July,  1866. 
Eastern  Superintendency  General  Recruiting  Service, 
New  York  City,  from  January,  1871.  Died  November 
30,  1879. 


120 


OFFICERS    OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY   [regular) 


COLONEL   AND   BREVET   BRIGADIER-GENERAL 

HANNIBAL   DAY.  U.S.A.    (de<  i  vsed). 

Colonel  \m>  Brevei  Brigadier-General  Hannibai 
Day  was  born  at  Montpelier,  Vermont,  February  17, 
1804;  he  was  the  son  of  Dr.  Sylvester  Day,  Surgeon 
I '.  S.  .\nn_\-.  and  grandson  of  Dr.  Elkanah  Day.  of 
Westminster,  Vermont, — one  of  the  pioneers  in  the  set- 
tlement of  that  State,  who  was  active  in  establishing  the 
State  government,  independent  of  the  States  of  New 
York  and  New  Hampshire. 

Genera]  Day  had  an  early  experience  in  the  military 
service,  when  in  the  beginning  of  the  War  of  1812  {  15th 
Inly),  at  the  age  of  eight  years,  he  with  his  father  and 
the  garrison  oi  Eort  Michilimackinac,  were  taken  [iris- 
oners  by  a  British  force  of  Canadians  and  Indians.  The 
prisoners  were  paroled  and  sent  to  Detroit,  where  they 
wi  re,  a  month  later,  at- the  surrender  of  the  United  States 
forces  on  16th  August,  1812,  of  which  event  and  of  the 
indignant  expressions  of  the  army  officers,  the  general 
retained  a  \i\  id  re.  1  illection. 

\iier  1  full's  surrender  the  Michilimackinac  paroled 
prisoners  were  all  taken  on  board  a  sloop  and  carried  to 
Fort  Erie,  on  Lake  Erie.  Captain  Elliot,  of  the  navy, 
was  at  Buffalo  with  some  boats;  and  the  gallant  Captain 
Laws, .11  was  there  with  the  land  tones;  la-  \olunteered 
to  man  the  boats  and  rescue  the  prisoners,  which  was 
acci  implished  on  a  dark  night  without  the  loss  of  a  man  ; 
no  mention  of  the-  services  of  the  army  was  made  by 
Elliot  in  the  report  of  the  affair.  After  his  rescue  and 
his  early  experience  of  the  incidents  of  war,  young  Han- 
nibal Day  returned  to  his  native  town  and  pursued  his 
studies  in  the  academic  schools  of  his  native  State.     In 


18 18  his  father  procured  for  him  an  appointment  of  cadet 
in  the  West  Point  Military  Academy.  Ill  health  pre- 
vented the  successful  pursuit  of  his  studies,  and  he  was 
allowed  to  enter  the  next  class  on  September  I,  1 8 19, 
and  he  was  graduated  on  the  1st  of  Jul}-,  1823,  and  was 
at  that  date  appointed  second  lieutenant  Second  Regi- 
ment U.  S.  Infantry,  and  served  in  the  same  regiment  in 
the  grades  of  first  lieutenant,  captain,  major,  and  lieuten- 
ant-colonel. (  >n  the  7th  of  July,  1862,  he  was  appointed 
colonel  of  the  Sixth  Regiment  of  Infantry.  Lie  was 
ommissioned  brigadier- general  by  brevet  on  March  13, 
1865,  for  long  and  faithful  service  in  the  ami}-. 

lie  served  fort}-  years  continuously:  In  garrison  at 
Fort  Brady,  Michigan,  1823—28;  on  Topographical  duty, 
1828-31  ;  in  garrison  at  Fort  Niagara,  New  York,  1832; 
Fort  Dearborn,  Illinois,  1832-33;  Hancock  Barracks, 
Maryland,  1833-36;  Fort  Independence.  Massachusetts, 
[836;  on  recruiting  service,  1836-3S;  in  the  Florida 
War,  1838-39  and  1841-42;  at  Buffalo,  .1842-45  ;  and 
Detroit,  1845—46.  In  the  Mexican  War  hew, is  stationed 
at  Tampico,  1846-47,  and  afterwards  served  in  many 
places  in  California  ami  on  the  Indian  frontier.  At  the 
beginning  of  the  Civil  War  he  was  at  Fort  Abercrombie, 
and  was  soon  ordered  to  Georgetown,  District  of  Colum 
liia,  in  command  of  the  Second  Infantry. 

Colonel  Hannibal  Day  commanded  the  first  brigade  of 
Ayer's  division,  Fifth  Arm}-  Corps,  and  was  actively 
engaged  at  the  battle  of  Gettysburg,  rendering  gallant 
service  in  the  defence  of  Round  Top,  on  the  extreme  left 
of  the  loyal  line,  where  he  had  a  horse  killed  under  him. 
I  le  held  the  same  command  during  the  march  to  Warren- 
ton,  Virginia,  and  until  he  was  retired  from  active  .ser- 
vice, August  1,  1863, owing  to  want  of  sufficient  physical 
strength  to  perform  service  in  the  field.  lie  then  com- 
manded Fort  Hamilton,  New  York,  till  Jul}-  8,  1864,  and 
afterwards  served  on  various  military  commissions  and 
courts-martial  till  June  14,  1869,  when  he  was  relieved 
from  duty, 

He  died  at  Morristown,  New  Jersey,  March  26,  1891, 
at  the  age  of  eighty-seven  years. 

At  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  third  in  academic 
rank  of  the  living  graduates  of  the  Military  Academy,  his 
seniors  being  Colonel  William  ('.  Young-,  of  the  Class  of 
1882, and  brevet  major-general  Georget  S.  Green,  of  the 
(  las-  of  1 82  3. 

General  Day  married,  in  1831,  Anna  Maria  Houghton, 
daughter  of  Thomas  and  Mary  Leggate  (Chase)  Hough- 
ton, who  died  in  1881.  He  leaves  one  son,  Sylvester 
Henry  Day,  of  Carson  City,  Nevada,  and  one  daughter, 
Mrs.  Hoff,  wife  of  Captain  John  Van  Rensselaer  Hoff, 
M.D.,  assistant  surgeon  U.  S.  Ann  v. 


WHO   SERVED   LV   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


121 


CAPTAIN   SELDEN   ALLEN   DAY,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Selden  Allen  Day  (Fifth  Artillery)  was 
born  at  Chillicothe,  Ohio,  July  22,  1838.  His  father, 
1  lemoval  T.  Day,  was  a  native  of  Virginia,  and  his 
mother,  Ruth  Merriam,  of  Vermont.  His  grandfather, 
Samuel  Day,  and  his  great-grandfather,  Leonard  Day, 
were  Virginia  soldiers  in  the  Revolutionary  War,  and 
both  were  at  the  capture  of  Yorktown  and  surrender  of 
Cornwallis.  In  April,  1861,  Captain  Day  obtained  au- 
thority and  raised  a  company  of  volunteers  at  Bowling 
Green,  Ohio,  for  the  war  of  the  Rebellion.  Owing,  how- 
ever, to  the  excess  of  troops  enrolled  under  the  first  call, 
this  company  was  not  mustered,  and  was  disbanded. 
Captain  Day  then  enlisted  as  a  private  in  Company  C, 
Seventh  Ohio  Infantry,  June  20,  1861,  participating  in 
the  campaign  in  West  Virginia,  that  year.  After  the 
action  of  Cross  Lanes  August  26,  where  his  regiment 
suffered  heavy  loss,  he  was  made  corporal.  He  was 
present  at  Loop  Creek,  Paw-Paw,  Romney,  etc.,  in  the 
winter  of  1861-62. 

At  the  battle  of  Winchester,  Virginia,  March  23,  1862, 
Corporal  Day,  though  injured  early  in  the  fight,  re- 
mained at  the  front ;  and  in  a  charge  of  his  brigade  was 
one  of  the  first  over  the  stone  wall  forming  part  of  the 
defence  of  the  enemy,  and  was  one  of  a  small  party  fol- 
lowing Major  Casement  into  a  battery  and  capturing  the 
guns.  At  the  close  of  the  fight  he  had  the  good  fortune, 
with  the  aid  of  a  comrade,  to  capture  and  bring  in  a  stafl 
officer  of  General  Jackson.  For  his  part  in  this  action 
Corporal  Day  was  promoted  sergeant  and  recommended 
for  a  commission. 

In  the  battle  of  Port  Republic,  June  9,  1862,  Ser- 
geant Day  bore  an  active  part,  and,  though  again 
wounded,  formed  one  of  the  rear-guard  in  the  retreat 
after  the  battle. 

At  the  battle  of  Cedar  Mountain,  where  his  regiment 
suffered  terribly,  August  9,  1862,  Sergeant  Day,  though 
at  one  time  "between  two  fires,"  escaped  unhurt,  and  at 
the  close  of  the  action  found  himself  in  command  of  the 
remnant  of  three  companies. 

The  fatigue  and  hardships  of  the  campaign  of  1862, 
however,  brought  about  at  last  what  shot  and  shell  failed 
to  accomplish,  and  at  its  close  we  find  the  subject  of  our 
sketch  liors  de  combat.  For  several  months  he  remained 
in  hospital  at  Frederick,  Maryland,  where,  having  for- 
merly studied  medicine,  as  soon  as  able  he  performed 
efficient  service  in  the  care  of  the  sick  and  wounded. 
During  this  time  he  was  given  the  option  of  a  discharge 
for  disability  or  a  transfer  to  the  regular  army  as  hos- 
pital steward.  He  chose  the  latter,  and  was  ordered  to 
Baltimore  for  duty.  When  that  city  was  threatened  in 
the  summer  of  1863,  Steward  Day,  under  the  mayor, 
was  instrumental  in  organizing  and  drilling  companies 
16 


made  up  of  members  of  the  Union   League  and  conva- 
lescents in  the  hospitals  for  special  service. 

After  his  health  was  restored,  and  on  application  for 
field  service,  Steward  Day  was  called  to  Washington, 
D.  C,  appointed  second  lieutenant  Fifth  Artillery,  and  in 
the  spring  of  1864  ordered  to  the  front.  He  joined  Bat- 
tery A  in  the  battle  of  Cold  Harbor,  and  was  brevetted 
first  lieutenant  for  that  action.  He  served  continuously 
in  the  field  until  the  close  of  the  war;  entered  Richmond 
with  Battery  F,  Fifth  Artillery,  April  3,  1865,  and  was 
brevetted  captain  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services 
during  the  war." 

Since  the  war  Captain  Day  has  served  in  various  parts 
of  the  country.  He  was  detailed  in  charge  of  cholera 
quarantine  at  Craney  Island,  Virginia,  and  afterwards 
to  command  Battery  F,  Fifth  Artillery,  at  Richmond, 
Virginia,  in  1866,  in  which  year  he  was  promoted  first 
lieutenant.  He  was  made  president  of  Board  of  Regis- 
tration and  Elections,  and  military  commissioner  in  Vir- 
ginia under  the  reconstruction  acts  in  1867-68.  For 
several  years  he  acted  as  ordnance  officer,  and  was  in- 
structor in  signalling  and  rifle  practice  at  Fort  Adams, 
Rhode  Island.  He  graduated  from  the  Artillery  School 
in  1874,  and  from  the  Medical  College  of  the  State  of 
South  Carolina  1880.  He  was  recorder  of  Board  on 
Magazine-Guns  1881-82;  promoted  captain  Fifth  Artil- 
lery 1886;  commanded  Fort  Wood,  Bedloe's  Island, 
New  York  harbor,  March  to  June,  1887. 

He  travelled  in  Europe  in  1888;  was  ordered  to  the 
Pacific  coast  in  1890,  and  assigned  to  the  command  of 
Fort  Mason,  San  Francisco,  California,  where  he  is  now 
serving. 

Captain  Day  is  a  man  in  the  prime  of  life,  of  medium 
height  and  weight,  fair  complexion,  with  brown  hair, 
gray-blue  eyes,  and  is  a  hard  worker,  an  enthusiastic 
sportsman,  and  an  expert  rifle-shot. 


I  22 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN  CHARLES  C.  DE  RUDIO,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Charles  C.  De  Rudio  (Seventh  Cavalry)  was 
born  on  August  26,  1832,  in  the  city  of  Bellemo,  then 
the  State  of  Venice.  In  [845  he  entered  the  Austrian 
Military  Academy  of  Milan.  At  the  revolution  of  [848 
he  left  the  Austrian  army  and  joined  the  Venetian  Legion 
of  the  Cacciatori  delle  Alpi  in  Venice  ;  served  and  par- 
ticipated at  the  siege  and  sorties  till  March,  1849,  "hen 
he  left  Venice  and  entered  the  Legion  of  Garibaldi  in 
Rome.  I  le  served  and  participated  with  that  legion  in 
the  battles  of  April  30,  1S49,  against  the  French;  at 
the  battles  of  Palestrina  and  Velletri  against  the  Nea- 
politan Bourbon  army,  and  at  the  siege  of  Rome  till 
its  fall. 

lb  entered  the  U.  S.  Volunteers  August  25,  1S64, 
in  the  Seventy-ninth  New  York  Highlanders,  and 
was  sent  to  the  front  in  Virginia.  He  joined  his  regi- 
ment at  F<>rt  Hays,  near  Petersburg,  Virginia;  served 
with  his  company  (A)  up  to  <  October  16,  1864,  when  he 
received  a  lieutenant's  commission  in  the  Second  U.  S. 
Colored  Troops.  He  was  discharged  from  the  Seventy- 
ninth  New  York  ti  1  enable  him  to  accept  the  c<  immission, 
and  two  weeks  afterwards  was  sent  to  his  company  (D), 
stationed  at  Fort  Meyer,  Florida.  He  was  then  ordered 
to  Punta  Rassa,  at  the  mouth  of  the  Caloosahatchee,  to 
guard  a  large  depot  containing  over  two  millions  of 
rations  and  ammunition,  collected  there  for  an  expedi- 
tion to  capture  Fort  St.  Mark,  Florida,  by  General  John 
Newton.  The  detachment  was  composed  of  sixteen  men. 
1  fining  their  absence  a  Confederate  force  attacked  Fort 
Meyer.  One  of  the  videttes  captured  by  the  enemy 
near  Fort  Meyei  escaped,  and  reported  to  Lieutenant 
De  Rudio  the  circumstances  of  his  capture  and  the  at 
tack  on  Fort  Meyer.  He  immediately  made  prepara- 
tion,, in  case  he  could  not  defend  the  depot,  to  destroy 


it  by  fire.  The  next  morning  the  enemy  made  his  ap- 
pearance in  the  mangrove  wood,  about  three  miles  off, 
but  soon  they  were  observed  to  be  on  a  precipitate 
retreat,  the  gun-boat  "  Thunderer"  happily  making  its 
appearance. 

In  a  few  days  General  Newton  arrived  with  the  Sev- 
enty-ninth, and  De  Rudio  was  complimented  by  the  gen- 
eral for  his  conduct.  Although  he  was  anxious  to  par- 
ticipate in  the  expedition,  he  was  ordered  to  remain  at 
his  post  with  thirty-sixty  men,  and  ordered  to  fortify  the 
place. 

On  the  return  of  the  expedition,  De  Rudio  was  ordered 
to  Fort  Meyer.  On  arriving  there,  he  was  informed  that 
the  post  was  to  be  abandoned,  and  that  he  had  been 
picked  out  to  remain  with  a  detachment  of  thirty  picked 
men,  for  the  purpose  of  destroying  the  fort,  after  the 
troops,  refugees,  and  property  had  safely  arrived  at  Punta 
Rassa,  as  the  enemy  was  supposed  to  be  in  the  vicinity 
of  the  fort.  The  garrison  left  by  land,  and  the  refugees 
and  property  were  transported  by  water.  Finding  that 
the  fort  could  not  effectually  be  destroyed,  after  demol- 
ishing all  the  barracks  and  buildings  the  block-houses 
were  burned.  After  executing  his  orders,  De  Rudio, 
during  the  night,  marched  to  Punta  Rassa. 

On  January  5,  1866,  he  was  mustered  out  at  Key 
West,  Florida. 

Lieutenant  De  Rudio  was  recommended  for  the  brevet 
of  captain  by  General  Newton,  but  he  never  received  it. 

On  August  31,  1867,  he  was  appointed  second  lieuten- 
ant Second  U.  S.  Infantry  by  General  U.  S.  Grant,  while 
Secretary  of  War  ad  interim.  He  reported  at  Louisville, 
Kentucky,  to  his  regiment.  In  March,  1.X6X,  he  was 
selected  by  the  major-general  commanding  the  depart- 
ment to  take  charge  of  a  detachment  of  fifty  picked 
mounted  infantry  at  Lebanon,  Kentucky,  for  the  purpose 
of  assisting  the  U.  S.  Marshal  to  enforce  the  Civil- 
Rights  Bill  and  the  public-revenue  law. 

In  April,  1869,  he  was  relieved  of  that  arduous  duty, 
and  ordered  to  his  company  at  Louisville,  then  under 
orders  to  go  to  Atlanta,  Georgia,  for  consolidation  with  the 
Sixteenth  Infantry.  On  August  17  he  was  placed  on  wait- 
ing orders  by  reason  of  being  a  junior  officer;  but  the 
same  day  received  a  telegram  from  the  Adjutant-General 
of  Department  of  Cumberland  to  report  without  delay 
to  those  head-quarters,  and  was  ordered  to  Lebanon, 
Kentucky,  to  resume  charge  of  the  mounted  detachment. 

Lieutenant  De  Rudio  was  recommended  by  Major- 
General  G.  H.  Thomas  for  transfer  to  the  cavalry,  and 
July  14,  1869  was  transferred  to  the  Seventh  Cavalry; 
and  the  following  month  was  relieved  from  Lebanon  and 
ordered  to  join  his  new  regiment  in  camp  near  Fort 
Hays,  Kansas.  He  was  assigned  to  H  Troop,  and  par- 
ticipated in  all  the  marches  and  campaigns  with  the  regi- 
ment up  to  1889. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


123 


CAPTAIN  GEORGE  DEWEY,  U.S.N. 

Captain  George  Dewey  is  a  native  of  Vermont,  and 
was  appointed  a  midshipman  from  that  State  in  Septem- 
ber, 1854.  He  graduated  from  the  Naval  Academy  in 
1858,  well  up  in  his  class,  and  served  in  the  frigate  "  Wa- 
bash," in  the  Mediterranean,  for  the  next  two  years.  When 
the  Civil  War  occurred  he  was  ordered  to  the  steam- 
frigate  "  Mississippi,"  and  served  at  New  Orleans,  Port 
Hudson,  and  Donaldsonville,  Louisiana,  in  that  vessel, 
having  been  commissioned  lieutenant  in  April,  1861.  The 
episode  of  the  destruction  of  the  "  Mississippi"  (although 
a  misfortune  to  the  cause,  in  the  unavoidable  destruction 
of  a  fine  vessel  which  was  not  only  very  serviceable,  but 
dear  to  many  officers  and  men  who  had  sailed  in  her) 
brought  forth  Lieutenant  Dewey's  fine  qualities  as  an  of- 
ficer in  a  more  marked  degree  than  any  previous  action. 
The  destruction  of  the  "  Mississippi,"  which  had  served 
on  stations  all  over  the  world,  and  bore  Perry's  broad- 
pennant  at  the  opening  of  Japan  to  the  world,  appropri- 
ately occurred  in  the  river  from  which  she  was  named, 
and  in  consequence  of  a  well-sustained  action.  The  whole 
affair  was  creditable  in  the  highest  degree,  and  especially 
to  Captain  M.  Smith  and  his  first  lieutenant,  who  had 
made  the  ship  so  efficient,  and  who  were  the  last  to  leave 
her.  Admiral  Porter  remarked,  "  It  is  in  such  trying 
moments  that  men  show  of  what  metal  they  are  made, 
and  in  this  instance  the  metal  was  of  the  very  best." 

After  the  destruction  of  the  "  Mississippi,"  Lieutenant 
Dewey  was  ordered  to  the  steam-gun-boat  "  Agawam," 
of  the  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  and  was  engaged 
heavily  with  rebel  batteries  in  August,  1864,  for  which 
Commander  Rhind,  his  officers  and  men,  received  the 
highest  praise  in  the  report  of  the  admiral  commanding 
to  the  Navy  Department. 

Lieutenant  Dewey  served  at  both  attacks  upon  Fort 
Fisher.  He  was  commissioned  lieutenant-commander 
March  3,  1865,  eleven  years  after  his  entry  as  an  act- 
ing midshipman.  He  served  in  the  "  Kearsarge,"  on  the 
European  Station,  in   1866.     He  was  transferred  to  the 


"Colorado,"  frigate,  flag-ship,  in  1867,  and,  for  some 
months,  served  on  board  the  "  Canandaigua,"  of  the  same 
squadron,  showing  executive  ability  of  a  high  order  at  a 
time  when  it  was  needed. 

During  1868-69  ne  was  stationed  at  the  Naval  Acad- 
emy, and  then  commanded  the  "  Narragansett,"  on  special 
service,  in  1870-71.  On  duty  at  the  Torpedo  Station  in 
1872 — just  as  he  was  made  commander.  For  the  next 
three  years  he  was  upon  the  Pacific  Survey,  in  the  "  Nar- 
ragansett," and  followed  this  service  by  a  term  as  light- 
house inspector.  He  was  the  secretary  of  the  Light- 
House  Board  from  1877  to  1882.  Then  he  made  a 
cruise  in  command  of  the  "  Juniata,"  on  the  Asiatic  Sta- 
tion, and  was  promoted  captain  in  1884.  In  that  year  he 
commanded  the  "  Dolphin,"  and  then  was  in  command 
of  the  "  Pensacola,"  the  flag-ship  of  the  European  Sta- 
tion, from  1885  to  188S. 

Captain  Dewey  is  now  the  chief  of  the  Bureau  of 
Equipment  and  Recruiting,  with  the  rank  of  commodore, 
having  been  commissioned,  and  approved  by  the  Senate, 
in  1889. 


124 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (.regular) 


CAPTAIN  JOHN  W.  DILLENBACK,  U.S.A. 

(  \  i tain  John  \V.  Dillenback  (First  Artillery)  was 
born  in  New  York;  appointed  from  New  York  ;  enlisted 
in  Company  G,  Tenth  New  York  ]  [eavy  Artillery,  August 
7,  1S62;  served  in  the  defences  of  Washington,  D.  C, 
until  August,  1863;  commissioned  by  the  President 
captain  in  the  Fourth  U.  S.  Colored  Infantry  August, 
1865;  commanded  battalion  on  recruiting  and  picket 
duty  at  Williamsburg,  Virginia,  to  April,  1864;  on 
duty  at  Point  Lookout,  Maryland,  till  May,  1864- 
n  ;agi  d  in  the  operations  of  the  Army  of  the  James  for 
the  capture  of  Petersburg,  Virginia,  till  June  15,  1864; 
severely  wounded   while  charging  a  battery  in  the  de- 


fences of  Petersburg,  Virginia,  June  15,  1864;  engaged 
in  repelling  attack  on  Fort  Harrison,  Virginia,  Septem- 
ber 30,  1864;  with  hist  expedition  under  General  Butler 
for  the  capture  of  Fort  Fisher,  North  Carolina,  Decem- 
ber, 1864;  engaged  in  the  operations  that  resulted  in  the 
capture  of  Fort  Fisher,  North  Carolina,  January  15,  1864; 
wounded  in  charge  on  works  on  Sugar-Loaf,  North 
Carolina,  in  the  advance  on  Wilmington,  North  Carolina, 
February  1  r,  1865  ;  with  General  Sherman's  army  at  the 
capture  of  Raleigh  and  surrender  of  General  Johnston's 
army;  served  in  North  Carolina  till  the  autumn  of  1865  ; 
commanded  successively  Forts  Mahan  and  Stanton,  near 
Washington,  D.  C,  until  April,  1S66;  was  brevetted 
major  and  lieutenant-colonel  of  volunteers  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  during  the  war,  and  honorably 
mustered  out  of  volunteer  service  April  11,  1866;  was 
appointed  second  lieutenant,  First  U.  S.  Artillery,  Feb- 
ruary 23,  1866;  first  lieutenant  May  1,  1866;  was  with 
light  batteries  of  regiment  in  New  Orleans,  and  Browns- 
ville, Texas,  to  May,  1867;  at  Artillery  School,  Fort 
Monroe,  Virginia,  and  graduated  May,  1869;  disbursing 
officer,  Freedmen's  Branch,  Adjutant-General's  Depart- 
ment, in  Savannah,  Georgia,  and  Charleston,  South 
Carolina,  from  1872  until  October,  1874;  appointed 
regimental  quartermaster  March  I,  1875,  and  served  as 
such  to  June  30,  1882,  when  he  was  promoted  to  captain, 
First  U.  S.  Artillery;  stationed  at  Fort  Adams,  Rhode 
Inland,  from  1S75  to  December,  1881  ;  on  duty  in  the 
harbor  of  San  Francisco,  California,  from  1881  to  May 
1890,  when  ordered  to  Fort  Hamilton,  New  York  harbor  ; 
assigned  to  command  of  Light  Battery  K,  First  Artillery, 
January  25,  1889,  and  still  retains  command  of  it  at  Fort 
I  [amilton,  New  York  harbor. 


WHO  SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


125 


CAPTAIN  EUGENE  D.  DIMM1CK,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Eugene  D.  Dimmick  (Ninth  Cavalry)  was 
born  in  Athens,  New  York,  July  31,  1S40.  He  entered 
the  volunteer  service  at  the  commencement  of  the  war  oi 
the  Rebellion  as  a  private  in  Company  G,  Second  New 
Jersey  State  Militia,  April  26,  1 86 1,  and  was  discharged 
July  31,  1 86 1.  He  re-entered  the  volunteer  service  as 
first  sergeant  of  Company  M,  Fifth  New  York  Cavalry, 
October  7,  1861,  and  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  of 
that  regiment  Ma)-  9,  1862,  and  promoted  first  lieutenant 
October  10,  1862.  He  participated  in  the  campaigns  of 
the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  was  engaged  in  the  actions 
of  Harrisonburgh  and  Culpeper,  battles  of  Cedar  Moun- 
tain (commanding  company),  second  Bull  Run  (escort  to 
General  Banks),  South  Mountain,  Antietam,  Brandy 
Station,  and  Chantilly;  actions  of  Warrenton  Junction, 
Thoroughfare  Gap,  Beverly  Ford,  and  Hanover  Junction  ; 
battle  of  Gettysburg,  and  actions  of  Boonsborough  and 
Hagerstown,  where  he  was  severely  wounded,  taken 
prisoner,  and  released. 

He  was  promoted  captain  July  5,  1863,  and  in  Novem- 
ber he  was  discharged  for  disability  arising  from  wounds. 
He  again  entered  the  service,  as  second  lieutenant  of  the 
Eighteenth  Regiment  Veteran  Reserve  Corps,  February, 
[864,  and  served  at  Albany,  New  York,  and  on  the 
Canada  border  during  the  Fenian  raids,  and  was  mustered 
out  June  30,  1866. 

Captain  Dimmick  entered  the  regular  service  as  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Ninth  Cavalry  August  9,  1867,  and 
joined  his  regiment  in  Texas,  where  he  served  from  1867 
to  1875,  and  was  then  ordered  to  change  station  with  his 
regiment  to  the  Department  of  the  Missouri,  he  taking 
station    first   at   Fort  Wallace,  Kansas.      lie  was  at  Fort 


Lyon,  Colorado,  in  1876,  and  then  was  changed  to  Fort 
Union,  New  Mexico,  where  he  served  in  1877-78.  He 
participated  in  the  campaign  against  Victorio  in  1879-80, 
through  New  Mexico,  Arizona,  and  Old  Mexico.  He 
was  after  that  detailed  on  recruiting  service  in  1882-84, 
subsequently  returning  to  Fort  Riley,  where  he  was 
during  the  years  1884-85. 

Lieutenant  Dimmick  was  promoted  first  lieutenant 
Ninth  Cavalry  January  10,  1870,  and  captain  October  25, 
1883.  He  participated  in  the  Boomer  campaign,  Indian 
Territory,  and  was  then  transferred  to  Fort  McKinney, 
Wyoming,  in  1885.  He  commanded  a  battalion  (D  and 
H  Troop,  Ninth  Cavalry)  at  the  affair  at  Crow  Agency, 
Montana,  November  5,  1887,  when  "  Sword-Bearer"  was 
killed. 


126 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  {regular 


COLONEL  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  ABNER 
DOUBLEDAY,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General  Abner 
Doi  bledai    was  born  at  Ballston  Spa,  New  York,  and 

iduated  from  the  Military  Academy  in  the  Class  of 
1842.  IK- was  then  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant 
of  the  Third  Artillery,  serving  three  years  in  this  grade, 
when  he  was  promoted  second  lieutenant  of  the  First 
Artillery  February  20,  [845,  and  first  lieutenant  March 

3.  |S47- 

lie  served  during  the  war  with  Mexico,  being  engaged 
in  the  battle  of  Monterey,  September,  1846,  and  in  the 
operations  connected  with  the  battle  of  Buena  Vista, 
February  22—23,  1847. 

At  the  close  of  the  Mexican  War  the  United  States 
government  purchased  <  California  for  three  million  dollars, 
rving  from  this  sum  sufficient  money  to  compensate 
our  merchants  residing  in  Mexico  whose  property  had 
been  illegally  confiscated  by  the  authorities  there.  A 
Cuban,  named  George  A.  Gardner,  of  English  descent, 
claimed  to  be  an  American  citizen.  He  a  erted  that  the 
President  of  Mexico  had  directed  that  the  entrance  to  a 
mine  belonging  to  him,  worth  eight  hundred  thousand 
dollars,  should  be  blown  up.  He  was  awarded  (in  1852) 
five  hundred  thousand  dollars.  After  the  money  was 
paid,  President  Fillmore  bi  1  ame  i  onvinced  that  Gardner 
never  owned  a   mine  in    Mexico,  but  there  was  such  a 

strong  1 m   for  him,  and  he  was  so  strongly  supported 

politically,  that  it  became  ne<  essary  to  take  extraordinary 
measures.     A  special   commission  was  sent  to   Me 
with  a  distinguished  lawyer  at  the  head.      It  included  our 
secretary  oflegation,  an  expert  in  Spanish  jurisprudence, 
one  officer  of  the  army,  and  one  of  the  navy.     Lieul 
ant  Doubleday  represented  the  army.     In  consequi 
of  their   report,   Gardner  was   ultimately  o  I,   he 

having  supported  his  claim  by  perjury  and  forged  docu- 


ments, and  committed  suicide  in  court  by  swallowing  a 
roll  of  strychnine. 

Lieutenant  Doubleday  was  promoted  to  a  captaincy 
March  3,  1855,  and  was  engaged  in  hostilities  with  the 
Florida  Indians  in  1856-58.  He  was  second  in  command 
at  Fort  Sumter,  South  Carolina,  at  the  time  of  its  first 
bombardment,  April  12-14,  1 86 1,  on  which  occasion  he 
aimed  the  first  gun  of  the  war  on  the  side  of  the  Union  ; 
he  was  appointed  major  of  the  Seventeenth  Infantry 
May  14.  1 861,  and  participated  in  the  Shenandoah  cam- 
paign, under  General  Patterson,  in  1861;  he  was  ap- 
pointed brigadier-general  of  volunteers  February  3, 
[862,  and  participated  in  the  campaign  of  the  Arm}-  of 
the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Groveton, 
second  Bull  Run,  South  Mountain,  Antietam,  Fredericks- 
burg, Chancellorsville,  and  Gettysburg;  having  been  pro- 
moted major-general  of  volunteers  November  29,  1S62. 

While  in  camp  near  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  he  was 
sent  with  two  regiments  to  make  a  demonstration  against 
Port  Conway,  on  the  lower  Rappahannock,  with  a  view 
to  attack  the  enemy  in  that  direction,  and  thus  facilitate 
the  crossing  of  General  Hooker's  army  above,  April 
20-2  t,  1863  ;  on  July  I  he  went  forward  to  Gettysburg, 
by  order  of  General  Reynolds,  to  reinforce  Buford's  cav- 
alry, who  were  holding  the  ridge  west  of  the  Seminary, 
and  General  Reynolds  being  killed,  General  Doubleday 
took  his  place,  acting  for  some  hours  in  command  of  the 
field,  when  General  Howard  made  his  presence  known.  On 
this  occasion  the  First  Corps  captured  Archer's  brigade, 
the  greater  part  1  if  1  )a\  is's  brigade,  and  almost  annihilated 
Iverson's  brigade.  The  second  day  General  Doubleday's 
division,  with  a  brigade  under  General  Stannard,  was 
sent  to  assist  in  regaining  the  position  which  the  enemy 
had  taken;  he  followed  them  up  and  retook  six  guns 
which  they  had  captured.  When  Pickett's  grand  charge 
advanced  on  the  third  davit  exposed  the  right  flank,  and 
General  Doubleday  s  front  line,  under  General  Stannard, 
wheeled,  threw  themselves  upon  the  vulnerable  point, 
and  disordered  the  enemy's  advance  to  such  an  extent 
that  they  were  easily  repulsed. 

General  Doubleday  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel 
Seventeenth  U.  S.  Infantry  September  20,  1863;  honor- 
ably mustered  out  of  volunteer  service  August  24,  1865  ; 
mel  Thirty-fifth  U.  S.  Infantry  September  15,  1867; 
assigned  to  the  Twenty-fourth  I'.  S.  Infantry  December 
15,  1870.  He  was  made  brevet  lieutenant-colonel  Sep- 
tember 17,  1862,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in 
the  battle  of  Antietam,  Maryland;  brevet  colonel  July 
2,  1863,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the 
of  Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania;  brevet  brigadier- 
and  major-general  March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  during  the  war. 

He  was  retired  from  active  service,  at  his  own  request, 
December  11,  1  873. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


127 


COLONEL  HENRY  DOUGLASS,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Colonel  Henry  Douglass  was  born  in  New  York- 
March  9,  1827,  and  graduated  from  the  Military  Acad- 
emy in  the  Class  of  1852,  when  lie  was  promoted  brevet 
second  lieutenant  of  the  Seventh  Infantry.  He  was  pro- 
moted second  lieutenant  of  the  Eighth  Infantry  December 
31,  1S53.  Upon  the  organization  of  the  Ninth  Infantry, 
in  1855,  he  was  transferred  to  that  regiment  March  3,  and 
gained  his  first  lieutenancy  September  10,  1856.  He 
served  in  garrison  at  Newport  Barracks,  Kentucky,  Fort 
Monroe,  Virginia,  and  on  frontier  duty. 

He  was  detailed  as  assistant  professor  of  drawing  at 
the  Military  Academy  January  16,  1858,  and  served  there 
until  July  2,  1861,  having  been  promoted  captain  of  the 
Eighteenth  Infantry  May  14,  1861.  He  entered  the  field 
during  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  and  participated  in  the 
battle  of  first  Bull  Run,  July  21,  i86[,  and  then  served 
in  the  defences  of  Washington  to  October  of  that  year. 
He  joined  his  regiment  in  the  Army  of  the  West,  partici- 
pating in  the  Tennessee  and  Mississippi  campaigns  and 
the  actions  connected  therewith  from  February  until  June, 
1 S62.  He  then  served  with  the  army  under  General  Buell, 
through  Mississippi,  Alabama,  Tennessee,  and  Kentucky, 
from  June  to  September,  1862,  being  engaged  in  the  skir- 
mish near  Chaplin  Hills,  and  in  the  battle  of  Perryville, 
October  8,  1S62.  He  also  participated  in  the  actions 
under  General  Rosecrans,  in  his  Tennessee  campaign,  from 
November,  1S62,  to  April,  1863,  ami  was  engaged  in  the 
battle  of  Stone  River,  where  he  was  wounded. 

Captain  Douglass  was  then  detailed  on  the  recruiting 
service  from  April  to  September,  1863,  and  on  mustering 
and  disbursing  duty  at  Cleveland,  Ohio,  from  December, 
1863,  to  January,  1864,  and  was  in  charge  of  chief  mus- 
tering and  disbursing  office  of  the  State  of  Ohio  from 
September,  1864,  to  June,  1866.  He  had  the  brevet  of 
major  conferred  upon  him  December  31,1 862,  for  "  gallant 


and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Murfreesborough, 
Tennessee." 

He  was  promoted  major  of  the  Third  Infantry  July  28, 
1866,  upon  the  reorganization  of  the  army,  and  served  on 
frontier  stations.  Upon  the  consolidation  of  regiments, 
in  1869,  he  was  unassigned,  March  15,  but  placed  on  duty 
as  superintendent  of  Indian  affairs  for  the  State  of  Nevada, 
which  position  he  occupied  until  January  1,  1871,  when 
he  was  assigned  to  the  Eleventh  Infantry.  He  was  pro- 
moted lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Fourteenth  Infantry  Jan- 
uary 10,  iS76,and  served  with  his  regiment  at  Fort  Cam- 
eron, Utah,  cantonment  on  the  LTncompahgre,  Colorado, 
and  Fort  Townsend,  Washington,  until  promoted  colonel 
of  the  Tenth  Infantry  July  1,  1885,  when  he  joined  his 
regiment  in  New  Mexico,  and  served  at  Fort  LTnion,  Fort 
Bliss,  Texas,  and  Santa  Fe  until  retired,  by  operation  of 
law,  March  9,  188  I. 

Colonel  Douglass  is  at  the  present  time  making  his 
home  at  Barnegat  Park,  New  Jersey. 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   PERCIVAL   DRAYTON,   U.S.N. 
(HI  ceased). 

Captain  Percival  Drayton,  an  officer  of  recognized 
ability  and  conduct  in  every  position  in  which  he  was 
placed,  was  horn  in  South  Carolina,  coming  of  a  well- 
known  and  influential  family.  His  father  was  the  Hon- 
orable William  Drayton,  M.C. 

Percival  Drayton  was  appointed  midshipman,  from 
South  Carolina,  in  December,  1X27,  and  became  a  lieu- 
tenant in  the  navy  on  February  28,  1838. 

After  the  usual  varied  service  of  the  younger  officers 
of  his  grade,  including  a  period  at  tile  Naval  Observa- 
tory at  Washington,  he  was  promoted  to  commander  in 
1S55.     When  the  Paraguay  expedition  was  organized,  in 


1S5S,  he  became  the  aid,  or  fleet-captain,  of  Commodore 
Shubrick,  returning  with  him  to  the  United  States  when 
a  satisfactory  settlement  was  had.  From  i860  to  the 
outbreak  of  the  Civil  War,  he  was  upon  ordnance  duty 
in  Philadelphia,  where  many  of  his  family  resided.  He 
was,  however,  strongly  bound  by  family  ties  to  the 
seceding  States.  He  never  wavered,  however,  but  de- 
clared his  allegiance  to  the  flag  under  which  he  had 
served  for  a  third  of  a  century. 

In  the  naval  expedition  which  resulted  in  the  capture 
of  Port  Royal  he  commanded  the  steamer  "  Pocahontas,'' 
of  Dupont's  squadron,  while  his  brother,  General  T.  F. 
Drayton,  commanded  the  Confederate  troops  at  Hilton 
Head  Island,  and  fought  the  principal  batteries  opposed 
to  the  squadron.  Such  instances  were  not  rare  during 
that  war. 

After  the  capture  of  Port  Royal  he  was  transferred  to 
the  "  Pawnee,"  and  on  July  16,  1862,  upon  his  promotion 
to  captain,  was  ordered  to  command  the  new  Ericsson 
monitor  "  Passaic." 

In  this  vessel  he  took  part  in  the  bombardment  of 
Fort  McAllister,  and  in  Dupont's  attack  upon  Fort 
Sumter. 

He  was  next  ordered  as  fleet-captain  of  the  West  Gulf 
Squadron  under  I^arragut,  and  served  in  the  flag-ship 
"  Hartford"  at  the  battle  of  Mobile  Bay,  August  5,  1864. 
He  particularly  distinguished  himself  as  Farragut's  chief 
of  staff,  as  the  detailed  accounts  of  this  remarkable  action 
show. 

He  was  appointed  chief  of  the  Bureau  of  Navigation 
on  April  28,  1865,  but  died  on  August  4,  1865,  at  Wash- 
ington. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


129 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL   RICHARD  CAULTER  DRUM, 
U.S.A.  (retired). 

Brigadier-General  Richard  Caulter  Drum  was 
born  at  Greensborougli,  Westmoreland  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, May  28,  1825.  His  military  history  commenced 
with  his  enrollment  as  a  private  in  Company  K,  First 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  December  8,  1846,  with  which 
he  served  during  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz.  He  was  ap- 
pointed second  lieutenant  Ninth  Infantry  February  18, 
1847,  and  served  with  that  regiment  during  active  oper- 
ations in  Mexico,  participating  in  the  battles  of  Contreras, 
Churubusco,  Molino  del  Rey,  Chapultepec,  Garita  Belen, 
and  capture  of  City  of  Mexico. 

He  was  transferred  to  Fourth  Artillery  March  8,  184S, 
and  returned  with  that  regiment  at  the  close  of  the  war, 
serving  immediately  after  in  .Alabama,  Florida,  and  Loui- 
siana, when  he  was  sent  to  the  light  batter)'  at  Fort 
Leavenworth  September  30,  1850,  and  thence  to  Fort 
Columbus  May  23,  185  1.  He  conducted,  by  the  over- 
land route,  recruits  from  New  York  to  Jefferson  Barracks, 
and  thence  to  E"ort  Kearney,  returning  July  30,  1851, 
and  joined  his  company  at  Governor's  Island. 

At  the  threatened  secession  of  South  Carolina  in  1851 
he  went  with  his  company  to  Fort  Johnston,  North 
Carolina,  where  he  remained  until  June  6,  1852,  when  he 
was  ordered  to  Fort  Brady,  Michigan,  and  was  stationed 
there  until  October,  1853,  at  which  time  he  was  assigned 
to  the  light  batten-  at  Fort  Leavenworth. 

In  May,  1855,  he  acted  as  quartermaster  and  commis- 
sary to  the  battalion  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  in  its  march 
from  Leavenworth  to  Kearney,  in  July ;  returned  to 
Leavenworth  and  joined  company  temporarily  armed 
as  mounted  riflemen,  and  served  with  it  against  hostile 
Sioux  Indians,  participating  in  the  action  of  Blue  Water 
September  3,  1855.  On  the  24th  of  October,  1855,  he 
was  appointed  aide-de-camp  to  General  W.  S.  Harney, 
commander  of  the  expedition,  to  June  30,  1856.  He 
commanded  a  detail  of  light  artillery  during  the  Kansas 
troubles  in  1856,  and  was  acting  depot  quartermaster  at 
Fort  Leavenworth.  He  was  appointed  aide-de-camp  to 
General  Persifor  F.  Smith,  commanding  Department  of 
the  West,  and  acting  assistant  adjutant-general  at  head- 
quarters of  that  department  until  the  death  of  General 


Smith,  in  May,  1S5S,  when  he  joined  his  company  at  the 
Artillery  School,  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  June,  1858. 
From  September,  1S58,  to  January,  i860,  was  adjutant 
of  the  school  and  ordnance  officer  until  March,  1861, 
when  he  was  appointed  assistant  adjutant-general,  and 
assigned,  at  the  request  of  General  Sumner,  to  duty  at 
the  Head-quarters  Department  of  the  Pacific,  where  he 
continued  to  serve  until  October,  1866.  He  reported 
to  General  Meade  November  1,  1866,  and  continued 
at  Head-quarters  Department  of  the  East  till  January, 
1 868,  when  he  accompanied  General  Meade  to  Head- 
quarters Third  Military  District,  Atlanta,  Georgia.  On 
the  20th  of  March,  1869,  he  was  assigned  to  the  Division 
of  the  Atlantic,  Philadelphia,  where  he  continued  to  serve 
until  the  death  of  Major-General  Meade,  November,  1872, 
when  he  reported  to  Major-General  Hancock  at  New 
York. 

In  November,  1873,  General  Drum  was  assigned  to 
duty  with  Lieutenant-General  Sheridan,  and  remained  at 
Head-quarters  Division  of  the  Missouri  until  May,  1878, 
when  he  was  assigned  to  duty  in  adjutant-general's 
office,  Washington,  D.  C. 

He  was  appointed  adjutant-general  of  the  army  June 
15,  1880,  and  was  retired  under  the  law  May  28,  1889. 

General  Drum's  present  residence  is  at  Washing- 
ton, D.  C. 


W 


130 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


LIEUTENANT -COLONEL  WILLIAM  F.  DRUM,  U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  William  F.  Drum  (Twelfth 
Infant]')')  was  born  on  Governor's  Island,  New  York, 
November  i6,  1833.  He  is  the  son  of  Captain  Simon 
A.  Drum,  Fourth  Artillery,  who  fell  while  commanding 
his  battery  at  the  Helen  Gate,  City  of  Mexico,  Septem- 
ber 13,  1S47.  He  was  at  Owatonna,  Minnesota,  in  the 
spring  of  1861,  and,  at  their  request,  drilled  young  men 
for  the  volunteer  service;  he  then  proceeded  to  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  in  May,  1861,  and  made  application  for 
commission  in  regular  army;  he  was  commissioned  by 
Governor  of  Ohio  to  raise  a  company  of  three  years' 
volunteers;  while  so  engaged  at  Springfield,  Ohio, 
received  appointment  in  regular  army,  and  resigned 
State  appointment. 

I  [e  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  of  the  Second 
United  States  Infantry  August  5,  [ 86 1,  having  partici- 
pated as  a  private  of  Company  F,  Second  Ohio  Volun- 
teers, in  the  battle  of  first  Bull  Run,  July  21,  iNf.i,  and 
discharged  July  3  1 ,  [861.  lie  joined  the  Second  United 
States  Infantry  in  Washington,  and  there  was  employed 
with  his  regiment  on  provost  duty  until  his  regiment 
took  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  in  [862, 
and  was  engaged  at  the  siege  of  Yorktown,  battles  of 
Gaines' Mill,  Malvern  Hill,  second  Bull  Run,  Antietam, 
action  of  Shepherdstown  Lord,  and  battles  of  Fred- 
ericksburg and  Chancellorsville;  and  with  reserve  at 
the  battles  of  Hanover  Court-House,  Mechanicsville,  and 
White  Oak  Swamp;  engaged  at  the  operations  at  Mine 
Run,  and  with  reserve  at  the  battles  of  Rappahannock 
Station  and  Bristoe  Station.  He  was  promoted  first 
lieutenant  l  >.  tober  9,  1861,  and  captain  May  1,  1863. 

Colonel  Drum  was  detailed  as  acting  inspector  of  the 
Provost-Marshal's  Department  of  the  State  of  Wiscon- 
sin in  May,  1863,  and  remained  on  that  duty  until  July 


of  the  same  year,  when  he  rejoined  his  company  in  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  but  was  shortly  transferred  with 
his  regiment  to  New  York  City,  where  he  participated  in 
quelling  the  draft  riots.  He  was  then  detailed  on  duty 
in  New  York  harbor,  and  appointed  inspector  of  the 
Prison  Camp  at  Elmira,  New  York,  until  February, 
[864,  when  he  joined  his  regiment  in  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  the  Wilder- 
ness, Spottsylvania,  North  Anna,  Tolopotomy,  Bethesda 
Church,  Petersburg,  Weldon  Railroad,  Poplar  Grove 
Church,  and  First  Hatcher's  Run;  he  was  appointed 
lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Fifth  New  York  Volunteers 
April  1,  [865,  and  was  engaged  at  the  battle  of  Five 
Forks,  Virginia,  and  the  subsequent  capitulation  of  Lee's 
army  at  Appomattox  Court-House  April  9,  1865.  He 
was  made  a  brevet  major  U.S.A.  for  gallant  services 
during  the  campaign  of  1  864  before  Richmond,  Virginia; 
brevet  lieutenant-colonel  U.S.A.  for  gallant  and  merito- 
rious services  at  the  battle  of  Five  Points,  Virginia. 

At  the  close  of  the  war  Colonel  Drum  was  on  duty 
guarding  mustered-out  troops  at  Hart's  Island,  from 
June  to  August,  [865,  when  he  was  mustered  out  of  the 
volunteer  service  and  joined  his  company  at  Fort  Ham- 
ilton, New  York  harbor.  He  was  in  November,  1865, 
transferred  with  his  company  to  Louisville,  Kentucky, 
where  he  was  detailed  as  acting  assistant  adjutant-gen- 
eral, which  position  he  occupied  to  March,  1869,  and 
from  that  time  to  September,  1876,  was  on  duty  with  his 
company  in  the  States  of  Alabama,  Georgia,  Mississippi, 
and  South  Carolina. 

He  was  then  ordered  on  recruiting  service  duty  at 
Boston,  Massachusetts,  from  which  he  was  relieved  at 
his  own  request  in  July,  1877,  and  joined  his  regiment, 
then  serving  in  the  Department  of  the  Columbia,  where 
he  participated  in  the  campaigns  incident  to  the  Nez 
Perces  and  Bannock  wars  of  1877-7S.  He  then  returned 
to  recruiting  service  in  Boston,  where  he  remained  to 
October,  1SS0.  On  returning  to  his  regiment  he  was  at 
Fort  Colville,  Washington,  and  was  transferred  to  the 
Department  of  the  Platte,  serving  with  the  Fourteenth 
Infantry  to  August,  1883,  having  been  promoted  major 
of  that  regiment  in  June,  1882.  He  was  at  Fort  Sidney, 
Nebraska,  until  June,  [884,  when  his  regiment  moved  to 
the  Pacific  coast,  where  he  was  detailed  as  acting  assist- 
ant inspector-general  for  the  Department  of  the  Colum- 
bia, but  was  transferred  in  that  position  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  Arizona  in  June,  1NS5,  and  in  August,  1888, 
again  changed  in  the  same  position  to  the  Department 
of  Dakota,  at  St.  Paul,  Minnesota. 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Twelfth 
Infantry  in  December,  1886,  but  was  continued  on  duty 
as  acting  assistant  inspector-general  at  St.  Paul  until  the 
fall  of  1  890,  when  he  was  relieved  and  joined  his  regi- 
ment at  Fort  Yates,  North  Dakota,  his  present  station. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


•3i 


REAR-ADMIRAL  SAMUEL  ERANCIS  DUPONT,  U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Rear-Admiral  Samuel  Francis  Dupont  was  born 
at  Bergen  Point,  New  Jersey  September  27,  1803  ;  died 
in  Philadelphia,  June  23,  1865  ;  grandson  of  P.  S.  Dupont 
Nemours.  Midshipman  in  the  navy  at  twelve  ;  lieutenant 
April  26,  1826;  commander  October  28,  1842.  In  1845 
he  was  ordered  to  the  Pacific  in  command  of  the  frigate 
"  Congress,"  and  during  the  Mexican  War  saw  much  active 
service  on  the  California  coast.  In  the  "  Cyane"  he  cap- 
tured San  Diego  ;  cleared  the  Gulf  of  California  of  Mexi- 
can vessels  ;  took  La  Paz,  the  capital  of  Lower  California  ; 
assisted  in  the  capture  of  Mazatlan  in  November,  1847, 
and  defended  Lower  California  against  the  Indians  and 
Mexicans.  In  February,  1848,  he  landed  at  San  Jose 
with  a  hundred  marines  and  sailors,  and  defeated  and 
dispersed  a  Mexican  force  five  times  as  great.  Captain 
September  14,  1855.  Having  recommended  the  occu- 
pation of  Port  Royal  as  a  central  harbor  or  depot  on  the 
Southern  coast,  he  was  given  the  command  of  the  South 
Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  and  intrusted  with  the 
attack  on  that  place.  Sailing  from  Fortress  Monroe, 
October  29,  1861,  in  the  "  Wabash,"  with  a  fleet  of  fifty- 
sail  of  war-vessels  and  transports,  conve)ing  General 
Sherman's  troops,  lie  arrived  off  Port  Royal  November 
4  and  5,  after  a  violent  storm,  and  on  the  7th  attacked 
and  captured  two  strong  forts  on  Hilton  Head  and  Bay 
Point,  which  defended  the  harbor.  lie  followed  up  this 
advantage  vigorously,  ami  his  operations  along  the 
Southern  coast  were  invariably  successful.  He  also  suc- 
ceeded in  making  the  blockade  more  effective  than  before. 
July  16,  1862,  he  was  made  a  rear-admiral  on  the  active 
list.  In  April,  1863,  he  commanded  the  fleet  which  un- 
successfully  attacked   Charleston.     He  was    soon    after 


relieved  of  the  command  of  the  South  Atlantic  Block- 
ading Squadron,  and  subsequently  held  no  active  com- 
mand. Admiral  Dupont  aided  in  organizing  the  Naval 
School  at  Annapolis,  and  is  the  author  of  a  report  on  the 
use  of  floating-batteries  for  coast-defence,  which  has  been 
republished  and  highly  commended  in  England  by  Sir 
Howard  Douglas  in  his  work  on  naval  gunnery. 

The  history  of  Dupont  de  Nemours  is  a  notable  and 
interesting  one.  For  three  generations  the  name  has 
been  associated  with  the  great  powder-mills  near  Wil- 
mington, Delaware,  which  are  carried  on  upon  a  grand 
scale,  with  enlightened  appreciation  of  the  changes  in 
explosives  required  by  modern  guns.  The  firm,  yet 
benevolent,  manner  in  which  the  employes  of  this  exceed- 
ingly hazardous  business  are  managed  is  worthy  of  all 
praise. 


1.32 


OFFICERS   OF  TFIF  ARMY  AXD   XAVY  {regular) 


COMMANDER  GEORGE  R.  DURANl).  U.S.N. 

Commander  George  R.  Durand  was  born  in  Con- 
necticut. Appointed  from  Rhode  Island,  and  rated 
master's  mate,  October  26,  1861  ;  steamer  "Mystic," 
North  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  part  of  1861-62. 
Appointed  acting  master  April  14,  1862;  executive, 
b  amer  "  Mohawk,"  South  Atlantic  Blockading  Squad- 
ron, part  of  1862-63,  and  commanding  same  vessel  latter 
half  of  1863;  executive,  sloop  "John  Adams"  and  steamer 
"  Paul  Jones,"  part  of  1864,  same  squadron  ;  in  July,  1864, 
while  on  an  expedition  up  the  Ogeechee  River,  Georgia, 
with   two  men   and   a   guide,  to   endeavor  to  burn   the 


steamer  "  Water-Witch,"  latch'  captured  from  us  by  the 
enemy,  was  captured  by  a  company  of  Confederates, 
thirty-four  men ;  was  confined  in  Savannah  and  Macon, 
Georgia,  Charleston,  South  Carolina,  and  I.ibby  Prison, 
Richmond,  Virginia  ;  navigator,  then  executive,  steamer 
"  Muscoota,"  Gulf  Squadron,  1865-66.  Promoted  to 
acting  volunteer  lieutenant  June  27,  1866;  executive, 
steamer  "Penobscot,"  New  York,  latter  part  of  1866; 
navigator,  then  executive,  steamer  "  Osceola,"  West 
Indies,  1867;  executive,  steamer  "  Maumee,"  1867-68. 
Commissioned  as  master  in  regular  navy  from  March  12, 
[868;  receiving-ship  "  New  Hampshire,"  Norfolk,  1868; 
navigator,  steamer  "  Ashuelot,"  Asiatic  Squadron,  1869. 
Commissioned  as  lieutenant,  from  December  18,  (868; 
receiving-ships  "  Vermont,"  at  New  York,  and  "  Van- 
dal ia,"  at  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  1870;  command- 
ing steamer  "Speedwell,"  at  Portsmouth,  New  Hamp- 
shire, 1871  ;  executive,  steamer  "  Nipsic,"  Gulf  and  West 
Indies,  [871—72;  receiving-ships  "Vermont,"  at  New 
York,  and  "  Ohio,"  at  Boston,  [873;  again  commanding 
steamer  "Speedwell,"  at  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire, 
part  of  [873—74;  receiving-ship  "  Ohio,"  1874;  com- 
manding iron-clad  steamer  "  Mahopac,"  North  Atlantic 
Station,  [874—76;  iron-clad  steamer  "  Canonieus,"  New 
<  Means,  part  of  1 S74  ;  receiving-ship"  Wabash,"  Boston, 
1S77.  Commissioned  as  lieutenant-commander,  from 
November  25,  1877;  commanding  iron-clad  steamer 
"Lehigh,"  North  Atlantic  Station,  [877—82;  executive, 
"Alliance,"  North  Atlantic  Station,  [883—86;  iron-clads, 
James  River,  [886-89.  Promoted  to  commander  March, 
1889;   Light-House  Inspector  1889-90. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


COMMANDER  N.    MAYO   DYER,    U.S.N. 

Commander  N.  Mayo  Dyer  entered  the  volunteer  navy 
in  1861  as  a  master's  mate  and  served  in  that  grade  in 
the  Western  Gulf  Squadron  until  he  was,  for  gallant  and 
meritorious  conduct,  promoted  to  acting  ensign  May  18, 
1863,  and  appointed  to  command  the  "  Eugenie,"  after- 
wards called  the  "  Glasgow,"  blockading  off  Mobile  and 
despatch  duty.  January  12,  1864,  promoted  to  acting 
master  in  consideration  of  gallant  and  faithful  service; 
July,  1864,  granted  two  months'  leave;  but  relinquished 
it  uiiiin  arriving  at  New  Orleans  en  route  north,  upon 
learning  of  the  near  prospect  of  an  attack  upon  the 
Mobile  forts.  Returning  off  Mobile,  and  soliciting  orders, 
he  was  assigned  to  the  "  Metacomet"  July  19,  1864,  in 
which  vessel,  as  the  consort  of  the  "  Hartford,"  took  part 
in  the  passage  of  the  forts  and  the  capture  of  the  rebel 
fleet,  receiving  the  surrender  of  the  "  Selma"  in  person. 
Upon  the  surrender  of  Fort  Morgan  he  accepted  his 
leave,  before  relinquished,  and  upon  his  return  therefrom, 
October  28,  1864,  was  ordered  to  the  "  Hartford,"  flag- 
ship of  Admiral  Farragut.  Upon  that  vessel's  return 
north,  December,  1864,  Master  Dyer  was  appointed  to 
the  command  of  the  U.  S.  S.  "  Rodolph,"  with  which 
command  he  co-operated  with  the  forces  under  General 
Granger  during  the  winter  of  1864-65,  in  their  operation 
against  Mobile  from  Pascagoula,  rendering  important 
service  in  this  connection  in  Mississippi  Sound  and  Pas- 
cagoula River.  In  the  advance  upon  the  defences  of 
Mobile  in  the  spring  of  [865  via  Blakely,  his  vessel,  the 
"  Rodolph,"  was  sunk  by  a  torpedo  in  Blakely  River 
April  1,  1865. 

April  22,  1865,  Master  Dyer  was  promoted  to  an 
acting  volunteer  lieutenant,  and  upon  the  surrender  of 
the  rebel  fleet  under  Commodore  Farrand,  in  the  Tom- 
bigbee  River,  May  10,  1865,  Lieutenant  Dyer  was  selected 
to  command  successively  two  of  the  surrendered  vessels, 
the  "  Black  Diamond"  and  "  Morgan  ;"  appointed  to 
i  ommand  the  "  Elk"  in  June,  1865,  and  in  July  ordered 
to  command  the  "  Stockdale,"  and  proceed  t<>  Mississippi 
Sound  for  the  protection  of  the  people  along  that  shore, 
and  to  "  cultivate  friendly  relations  with  the  people  lately 
in  rebellion;"  September,  1  865,  "  Stockdale"  was  ordered 
to  New  Orleans  to  be  sold,  and  Lieutenant  Dyer  was 
transferred  to  the  "  Mahaska"  at  Apalachicola,  Florida  ; 
in  October  detached  from  the  "  Mahaska"  and  ordered 
to  command  the  "  Glasgow"  at  Pensacola;  April,  1866, 
detached  and  ordered  north  to  report  to  the  Bureau  of 
Navigation;  on  special  duty  in  that  bureau  until  May, 
1868. 

Commissioned  a  lieutenant  in  the  regular  navy  March 
12,  1 868;  July,  1868,  ordered  to  the  "  Dacotah,"  South 
Pacific  Squadron,  joining  at  Valparaiso  August  27. 
December    18,    1868,   commissioned   as   lieutenant-com- 


mander; the  "Dacotah"  being  ordered  to  San  Fran- 
cisco, upon  her  arrival  there  Lieutenant-Commander 
Dyer  was  ordered,  September,  1869,  to  command  the 
"Cyane,"  and  proceed  to  Sitka,  Alaska,  where  he  re- 
mained until  March,  1870,  from  whence  he  was  ordered 
to  San  Francisco  to  join  the  "  Pensacola ;"  ordered  to 
"  Ossipee"  July,  1870,  on  a  short  cruise  to  Lower  Cali- 
fornia and  the  Mexican  coast.  While  the  "  Ossipee"  was 
proceeding  north  from  the  Mexican  coast,  she  encoun- 
tered a  hurricane,  which  left  the  sea  in  a  troubled  state, 
and  in  the  morning,  whilst  making  a  sail,  a  man  fell  oxer- 
board  from  the  maintopsail-yard,  the  halyards  carrying 
him  away  while  hoisting  topsails.  Striking  in  the 
main-chains  he  was  knocked  senseless,  and  was  drifting 
astern. 

Commander  Dyer  was  taking  an  observation  on  the 
poop-deck,  and,  immediately  turning  a  bowline  in  the  end 
of  a  boat-fall,  jumped  into  the  sea  and  saved  the  man  from 
sharks  or  drowning.  For  this  he  was  publicly  thanked  by 
Commodore  W.  R.  Taylor,  commander-in-chief,  and  re- 
ceived a  medal,  etc.  In  September  to  the  South  Pacific 
Station;  detached  and  ordered  home  August  22,  1S71  ; 
November  7,  1  871 ,  ordered  to  Boston  Navy- Yard;  Sep- 
tember 1,  1873,  to  Torpedo  School  at  Newport;  No- 
vember 24  to  command  torpedo-boat  "  Mayflower"  at 
Norfolk,  for  duty  on  the  North  Atlantic  Station  ;  April 
IO,  1874,  transferred  to  command  of  the  "  Pinta  ;"  Feb- 
ruary, 1876,  detached  from  the  "  Pinta"  and  ordered  to 
the  "  New  Hampshire"  as  executive-officer  for  perma- 
nent flag-ship  at  Port  Royal.  He  was  detached  from  the 
"New  Hampshire"  in  December,  1876,  and  was  next 
upon  equipment  duty  at  the  Boston  Navy- Yard.  "  Wa- 
bash," receiving-ship,  1880-81.  "  Tennessee,"  North  At- 
lantic Station,  1881-83.  Promoted  commander  April, 
1883;  light-house  inspector  1883-87;  commanded  the 
"  Marion,"  Asiatic  Station,  1887-90. 


'34 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  [regular) 


C  MM  M\  AND  BREVET  MAJOR  CHANDLER  P.  EAKIN, 
U.S.A.  (retired). 

Captain  and  Brevet  Major  Chandler  P.  Eakin 
was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  December  26, 
1836.  He  entered  the  volunteer  service  at  the  com- 
mencement of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  as  private  of  an 
independent  company  of  Pennsylvania  heavy  artillery 
April  24,  1861,  and  was  discharged  June  25,  1861.  He 
entered  the  regular  service  as  second  lieutenant  of  the 
First  Artillery  August  5,  [861,  and  was-  promoted  first 
lieutenant  October  26,  1861.  He  served  with  his  com- 
pany in  Maryland  to  (  Ictober,  1861.  He  participated  in 
the  campaigns  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  in  1862-63, 
and  was  engaged  at  the  siege  of  Yorktown  and  battles  of 
Williamsburg  (where  he  was  severely  wounded)  and 
Gettysburg,  where  he  was  again  severely  wounded. 

lie  joined   his  battery  in  January,  [864,  and  w; 
recruiting  duty  from  April,  [864,  to  January,  1865,  when 
he  joined  and  commanded  his  battery  in  front  of  Peters- 
bur-,  Virginia,  and   participated    in    General    Sheridan's 
march  to  North  Carolina.      He  was  brevetted  captain  for 


"  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Wil- 
liamsburg," and  major  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices in  the  battle  of  Gettysburg." 

On  July  28,  1 866,  he  was  appointed  captain  of  the 
Forty-second  Infantry,  which  he  declined,  and  eight 
years  afterwards  (October  1,  1S74)  became  captain  in  the 
hirst  Artillery. 

Captain  Eakin  was  at  Fort  Schuyler,  New  York,  from 
<  ><  lober,  1S65,  to  April,  1866,  and  then  was  detailed  on 
recruiting  duty  at  Philadelphia,  and  on  court-martial  duty 
in  New  York  City,  to  January,  1868.  He  was  at  Fortress 
Monroe  to  November,  1S6S,  and  at  McPherson  Barracks, 
Georgia,  to  December  of  the  same  year,  at  which  time 
he  was  ordered  to  the  Artillery  School  of  Fortress 
Monroe.  Leaving  here  in  May,  1869,  his  lot  carried 
him  to  the  posts  of  New  York  harbor  until  November, 
1  87 j,  when  a  change  of  stations  occurred,  and  he  was 
stationed  first  at  Key  West,  and  subsequently  at  Bar- 
rancas, Florida,  at  which  latter  place  he  was  in  1874, 
during  the  yellow-fever  epidemic.  Here  his  old  wounds 
reopened,  and  he  was  taken  to  New  (  Irleans,  and  thence 
to  his  home  in  Philadelphia,  where  he  remained  on  sick- 
leave  until  December,  1S75,  when  he  rejoined  his  battery 
at  Fort  Adams.  In  July,  1876,  he  was  sent  to  Fort  Sill, 
Indian  Territory,  during  the  Sioux  war  of  that  year,  and 
in  December  following  was  stationed  at  Washington 
Barracks,  D.  C. ;  and  in  1877  was  ordered  to  Fort 
Adams,  from  which  point  he  moved  to  Philadelphia, 
thence  to  Reading,  and  finally  to  Mauch  Chunk,  taking 
part  in  quelling  the  mining  riots  of  that  year,  after  which 
he  returned  to  Fort  Adams. 

Captain  Eakin,  with  his  battery,  participated  in  the 
Yorktown  celebration  in  1881,  and  in  the  fall  of  that 
year  changed  stations  to  California,  serving  at  Fort  Point, 
Fort  Canby,  and  the  Presidio  of  San  Francisco,  from 
which  point  he  was  retired  for  disability  in  the  line  of 
duty  January  14,  1SS8. 

Major  Eakin  is  the  son  of  Lieutenant  C.  M.  Eakin, 
Second  Artillery,  and  grandson  of  Paymaster  Samuel  H. 
Eakin,  U.  S.  Army. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


135 


CAPTAIN  FREDERICK  H.  E.   EBSTEIN.  U.S.A. 

Captain  Frederick  H.  E.  Ebstein  (Twenty-first 
Infantry)  was  born  at  Militsch,  Prussia,  April  21,  1847; 
educated  at  the  Poughkeepsie  (New  York)  Collegiate 
Institute.  He  entered  the  military  service  November  18, 
1864,  at  the  age  of  seventeen,  as  a  private  in  Company  H, 
Fourth  United  States  Infantry.  He  joined  his  regiment 
in  the  field  in  Virginia,  and  served  with  it  there  till  the 
close  of  the  war.  Subsequently,  as  a  corporal  and  ser- 
geant, he  served  at  Batter)-  Barracks,  New  York  ;  Fort 
Schuyler,  New  York  harbor,  and  Fort  Wayne,  Michigan. 
Later  he  became  chief  clerk  at  head-quarters  of  the 
Departments  of  the  Ohio  and  of  the  Lakes. 

He  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the  Eighteenth 
Infantry  September  12,  1867,  joining  his  regiment  at  Fort 
Fetterman,  Wyoming ;  serving  later  at  Fort  Sedgwick, 
Colorado,  and  Atlanta,  Georgia.  While  on  the  plains  he 
participated  in  several  scouts  against  hostile  Sioux. 

He  was  placed  on  waiting  orders  by  the  consolidation 
of  regiments  in  1860,  but  was  in  Jul}-  of  the  same  year 
assigned  to  the  Twenty- first  Infantry,  joining  Company  H 
at  Camp  Date  Creek,  Arizona,  and  was  engaged  in  post 
and  scouting  duty  in  that  Territory  during  the  three  years 
follow  ing. 

Being  transferred  to  San  Juan  Island,  Washington 
Territory,  in  1872,  he  received,  on  behalf  of  the  United 
States,  the  British  property  on  that  island,  upon  the  with- 
drawal of  the  British  troops. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  February  19,  [873, 
and  served  at  Fort  Klamath,  Oregon,  until  June,  1876, 
when  he  was  appointed  regimental  quartermaster,  and 
ordered  to  Fort  Vancouver,  Washington  Territory.  In 
the  summer  and  fall  of  1877  he  participated  in  the  expe- 
dition against  hostile  Nez  Perces,  as  chief  quartermaster 
on  the  staff  of  General  O.  O.  Howard,  and  was  present 
at  the  engagements  at  Cottonwood  (Ravine),  Idaho,  and 
Camas  Meadows,  Montana.  On  being  relieved,  he  re- 
ceived the  following  complimentary  order  :  "  The  general 
commanding  takes  this  opportunity  to  express  his  satis- 
faction at  the  efficient  manner  in  which  Lieutenant  Ebstein 
has  discharged  the  duties  of  chief  quartermaster  of  this 
expedition." 

In  the  summer  of  1S78  he  was  again  in  the  field  against 
the  Bannock  Indians,  serving  as  chief  quartermaster  on 
the  staff  of  General  O.  O.  Howard,  and  participated  in 
the  engagement  at  Umatilla  Agency,  Oregon.  Return- 
ing to  Fort  Vancouver,  he  resumed  duty  at  that  post  as 
regimental  and  post  quartermaster  until  September  30, 
1880,  when  he  resigned  his  regimental  staff  appointment 
to  accept  the  recruiting  detail. 

He  served  as  depot  adjutant,  David's  Island,  New  York 


harbor,  to  October,  1S82  ;  then  travelled  in  Europe  during 
the  winter  of  [882-83,  and  subsequently  served  at  Fort 
Canby  and  Vancouver  Barracks,  Washington,  and  was 
subsequently  transferred  with  his  regiment  to  Fort  Sid- 
ney, Nebraska,  in    1884. 

He  became  captain  April  1,  1885,  and  served  in  the 
field  at  Crisfield,  Kansas,  as  acting  assistant  adjutant- 
general  of  the  troops  assembled  there  during  the  Cheyenne 
troubles  in  18S5,  and  again  in  the  fall  of  the  same  year 
in  command  of  his  company  at  Rock  Springs,  Wyoming, 
during  the  anti-Chinese  riots.  He  participated  also  in 
the  camps  of  instruction  at  Kearney,  Nebraska,  1888,  and 
Fort  Robinson,  Nebraska,  1889. 

In  addition  to  the  above-mentioned  service,  Captain 
Ebstein  has  performed  duty  as  issuing  commissary  for  the 
Apache-Mojave  and  Apache-Yuma  Indians;  as  quarter- 
master, commissary,  and  adjutant  at  various  posts;  as 
acting  assistant  adjutant-general,  District  of  the  Lakes, 
and  as  disbursing  quartermaster  at  head-quarters,  Depart- 
ment of  the  Columbia.  He  has  performed  the  duties  of 
judge-advocate  of  numerous  important  courts-martial 
and  courts  of  inquiry;  was  recorder  of  the  court  of 
inquiry  appointed  by  the  President  at  Jefferson  Barracks, 
Missouri,  to  investigate  the  causes  of  desertions;  was  on 
duty  under  the  War  Department  in  connection  with  the 
establishment  of  canteens  at  military  posts  ;  member  of 
boards  of  examination  for  promotion  of  non-commis- 
sioned officers,  and  president  of  board  of  officers  at  Fort 
Snelling,  to  prepare  a  system  of  book-keeping  for  post 
canteens.  In  the  winter  of  1890  he  participated,  in  com- 
mand of  his  company,  in  the  Sioux  campaign. 

Captain  Ebstein's  present  station  is  with  his  company 
at  Fort  Sidnev,  Nebraska. 


ij6 


OFFICERS  OF  THE  ARMY  AXD  NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR  WILLIAM  FRANCIS  EDGAR,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Major  William  Francis  Edgar  was  horn  in  Ken- 
tucky, and  entered  the  regular  service  as  first  lieutenant 
and  assistant  surgeon  March  2,  1849.  His  first  duty 
was  .it  Jefferson  Barracks,  Missouri,  and  he  then  accom- 
panied the  Second  United  States  Dragoons  on  the  march 
fnmi  that  place  to  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  lie  was 
next  ordered  with  the  Mounted  Rifles  on  the  march 
overland  to  Oregon,  and  subsequently  in  an  expedition 
to  Utah,  and  at  Fort  Hall  (Cantonment  Loring),  Rocky 
Mountains,  up  to  April,  1850.  He  served  in  Oregon 
and  Washington  Territories  to  April,  [851,  and  partici- 
pated in  an  expedition  against  the  Rogue  River  Indians 
with  the  First  Dragoons  (Major  Philip  Kearney's  expe- 
dition), and  thence  en  route  to  California,  to  August 
1851. 

The  doctor  was  then  stationed  at  Sonoma  and  Benicia, 
California,  with  the  First  Dragoons  and  Second  Infantry, 
and  at  Camp  Miller,  head-waters  San  Joaquin  River, 
with  the  Second  Infantry.  From  this  point  he  accom- 
panied the  Second  Infantry  in  an  expedition  against  hos- 
tile  Indians  in  the  Yosemite  Valley  and  Sierra  Nevada 
Mountains,  t<>  September,  1852.  lie  was  then  stationed 
at  Fort  Reading,  head-waters  of  the  Sacramento  River, 
with  the  Fourth  Infantry,  and  took  the  field  with  the 
First  Dragoons  en  route  to  establish  Fort  Tejon.in  South- 
ern California.  The  doctor  was  partially  paralyzed  on 
the  left  side,  on  returning  to  camp  on  the  morning  of 
December  9,  1N54,  after  unusual  exertion  while  being 
exposed  all  the  previous  night  to  the  intense  cold  of  a 
mountain  snow-storm,  and  an  injury  of  the  left  hip  and 


lower  part  of  the  spine,  from  the  falling  of  a  horse  while 
cut  searching,  with  a  teamster,  for  a  wounded  soldier. 

He  was  promoted  captain  ami  assistant  surgeon  March 
2,  1854,  and  in  April,  I  S 5  5 ,  was  en  route  to  Washington, 
and  subsequently  assigned  to  duty  at  Jefferson  Barracks, 
with  the  Second  Cavalry.  His  service  here  was  of  tem- 
porary duration,  for,  in  September  of  the  same  year,  he- 
was  en  route  to  Texas  by  sea.  In  1856  he  was  at  the 
Head-quarters  Department,  Texas,  from  which  he  was 
ordered  with  the  Second  Artillery  by  sea  and  stationed 
with  that  regiment  in  Florida  for  a  short  while,  when  he 
was  ordered  to  New  York  by  sea,  with  the  sick  of  the 
troops  serving  in  Florida. 

The  doctor  was  stationed  at  Fort  Wood,  New  York 
harbor,  until  \'. S57,  when  he  was  detailed  for  duty  in  the 
office  of  the  medical  purveyor  at  New  York  City.  He 
was  then  ordered  to  accompany  recruits  to  California 
and  was  stationed  at  Fort  Miller,  with  the  Third  Artil- 
lery, but  was  subsequently  changed  to  the  Presidio  of  San 
Francisco,  and  afterwards  to  Benicia.  He  participated 
in  an  expedition  with  the  First  Dragoons  against  the 
Mojave  Indians  on  the  Colorado  River  in  1858,  and  in  an 
expedition  against  the  same  in  Arizona  in  1859,  with  the 
Sixth  Infantry  and  Third  Artillery,  and  then  stationed  at 
Camp  Prentice,  California,  and  San  Diego,  with  part  of 
the  Fourth  and  Sixth  Regiments  of  Infantry  until  No- 
vember, 1 86 1. 

These  regiments  being  ordered  east,  to  take  part  in  the 
war  of  the  Rebellion,  the  doctor  was  ordered  to  accom- 
pany them  by  sea  to  New  York,  and  thence  to  Washing- 
ton, D.C.  He  was  promoted  major  and  surgeon  May 
24,  1861,  and  upon  arrival  at  Washington  was  ordered 
to  duty  with  General  Buell's  army  in  Kentucky,  and  was 
given  charge  of  the  General  Hospital,  Number  4,  in 
Louisville.  He  was  medical  director  of  the  district  of 
Cairo,  Illinois,  to  1862,  when  he  was  taken  sick  on  ac- 
count of  feeble  health,  resulting  from  former  injuries. 
Upon  replying  to  an  inquiry  regarding  field  duty  at  that 
tunc,  "that  a  surgical  operation  was  necessary  first,"  he 
was  ordered  before  a  retiring  board  and  retired  from 
active  duty  "  for  disability  in  the  line  of  duty."  Fie  was 
then  placed  on  duty  in  the  medical  director's  office  of 
the  Department  of  the  East,  as  assistant  medical  director, 
and  while  there  was  member  of  the  board  examining 
applicants  for  admission  to  the  medical  corps  of  the 
army.  The  doctor  performed  various  other  duties,  and 
was  sent  once  more  to  California  by  sea,  in  March,  1866; 
but  upon  his  own  application  was  relieved  from  duty 
May  21,  1869,  for  one  year,  and  in  consequence  of  the 
act  of  Congress  of  1870  was  not  again  assigned  to  duty. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


137 


COMMODORE  HENRY   ERBEN,  U.S.N. 

Commodore  Henry  Erben  is  a  native  of  the  city  of 
New  York,  and  was  appointed  midshipman  in  June, 
1  848,  from  that  city.  He  was  ordered  to  the  frigate  "  St. 
Lawrence,"  and  served  in  that  fine  vessel  from  July, 
1S4S,  to  July,  1853  ;  was  on  duty  on  the  Coast  Survey  in 
1854,  and  at  the  Naval  Academy  in  1855.  He  became 
passed  midshipman  the  same  year.  While  serving  in  the 
"Potomac"  frigate,  in  1855,  he  was  made  master,  and 
ordered  to  the  prize  filibuster  bark  "  Amelia,"  which  had 
been  captured  at  Porto-Prince,  Hayti.  The  officer  in 
charge  was  ordered  to  take  her  to  New  York,  but,  after 
seventy  days  at  sea,  he  arrived  at  St.  Thomas,  destitute  of 
provisions  and  a  wreck.  During  1856-57  he  was  attached 
to  the  store-ship  "  Supply,"  employed  in  bringing  camels 
for  the  War  Department  from  Egypt  to  Texas.  He  was 
made  lieutenant  in  December,  1856.  For  a  part  of  1857 
he  was  in  the  steamer  "  Vixen,"  making  deep-sea  sound- 
ings for  the  Atlantic  cable,  and  in  August  joined  the  U.S.S. 
"  Mississippi,"  and  served  in  her  in  the  East,— bringing 
home  the  Chinese  treat}-  in  November,  1859.  While  serv- 
ing in  the  Gulf  of  Mexico,  in  the  "  Supply,"  he  was  at 
Pensacola  when  the  navy-yard  there  was  surrendered  to 
the  troops  of  Alabama  and  Florida.  lie  assisted  in  trans- 
ferring the  troops  under  Lieutenant  Slemmer  from  Fort 
Barrancas  to  Fort  Pickens  <  m  the  night  of  January  9,  [861. 
On  the  previous  day  he  had,  with  a  boat's  crew,  spiked 
the  guns  at  Fort  MacRea,  destroyed  material  and  twenty 
thousand  pounds  of  powder.  He  returned  to  New  York 
with  the  sailors,  marines,  and  workmen  of  the  surrendered 
navy-yard. 

In  March,  1861,  he  returned  to  Fort  Pickens  in  the 
"  Release,"  and  was  transferred  to  the  "  Huntsville"  on 
the  blockade.  In  action  with  rebel  gun-boats  and  bat- 
teries at  Ship  Island,  and,  in  December,  off  Mobile  with 
the  rebel  gun-boat  "  Florida,"  which,  during  the  tem- 
porary absence  of  the  "  Huntsville,"  had  come  out  in  a 
calm  to  destroy  the  sailing-frigate  "  Potomac." 

He  was  ordered  to  the  Mississippi  River  fleet  in  April, 
1862,  and  commanded  iron-clad  "St.  Louis"  at  the  siege 
of  Fort  Pillow  and  in  action  with  rebel  rams,  May,  1862  ; 
capture  of  Memphis  in  June,  1862.  Served  on  the  ad- 
miral's staff!  Commanded  the  "  Sumter"  at  the  siege  of 
Vicksburg,  and  passed  the  batteries  there  with  Farragut, 
July  15,  1862.  At  the  battle  of  Baton  Rouge  August  6, 
1862,  and  destruction  of  rebel  ram  "Arkansas"  August 
7,  1862.     Lieutenant-commander  on  July  16,  1862. 

He  returned  to  the  east  to  join  the  naval  howitzer 
battery  in  Maryland,  with  General  McClellan,  during  the 
Antietam  campaign,  and  in  October,  1862,  joined  the 
monitor  "  Patapsco"  as  executive-officer.  Engaged  at  Fort 
McAllister  in  March,  1S63,  and  attack  on  forts  at  Charles- 
ton in  April,  1863.  Steam-frigate  "  Niagara"  on  special 
18 


service  on  Atlantic  coast  from  November,  1863,  to  May, 
iSf4.  In  July,  [ 864,  he  was  ordered  to  command  monitor 
"  Chimo"  and  then  the  monitor  "Tunxis,"  which  vessels 
were  intended  to  destroy  the  ram  "Albemarle,"  but  were 
found  unseaworthy  and  condemned.  In  October,  1864, 
ordered  to  command  "  Ponola,"  West  Gulf  Squadron, 
and  captured,  under  the  guns  of  batteries  at  Matagorda, 
Texas,  the  schooner  "  Dale"  and  the  boats  of  the  torpedo 
station,  with  twenty  men;  broke  up  the  establishment. 
Engaged  the  batteries  at  Galveston  in  attempting  the 
destruction  of  a  blockade-runner,  the  "  Let  Her  Be."  In 
July,  1865,  he  was  ordered  home,  and  was  on  duty  at  the 
New  York  Navy-Yard  during  1866.  From  1867101869 
he  commanded  steamers  "  1  Iuron,"  "  Kansas,"  and  "  Paw- 
nee" on  South  Atlantic  Station.  He  was  commissioned 
commander  in  1868.  During  1871-72  he  was  upon  ord- 
nance and  rendezvous  duty  in  New  York,  and  in  1873 
commanded  the  monitor  "  Manhattan"  at  Key  West  dur- 
ing the  critical  period  of  a  serious  misunderstanding  with 
Spain. 

In  1874-75  Commander  Erben  was  in  command  of 
the  "Tuscarora,"  of  the  North  Pacific  Squadron,  and 
employed  in  running  deep-sea  soundings.  He  then  had 
a  term  of  shore-duty  at  the  navy-yard,  Portsmouth,  New 
Hampshire;  but  went  to  sea  again,  from  1878  to  1882,  in 
command  of  the  nautical  school-ship  "  St.  Mary's."  He 
was  promoted  captain  in  1879,  and  commanded  the  "  Pen- 
sacola," in  188^-84,  in  cruise  around  the  world.  He  then 
had  another  turn  of  duty  at  the  Portsmouth  Navy-Yard, 
and  then  was  on  special  duty  at  New  York  for  three 
years. 

In  the  early  part  of  1 891  Captain  Erben  was  ordered 
as  governor  to  the  Naval  Asylum  at  Philadelphia,  but, 
being  promoted  commodore  in  1892,  was  soon  transferred 
to  the  important  command  of  the  New  York  Navy- Yard, 
which  he  now  holds. 


133 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular* 


COMMANDER   R.  D.  KVANS.  U.S.N. 

Commander  Robley  Dunglison  Evans  was  born  in 
Virginia,  but  was  appointed  a  midshipman  from  the 
Territory  of  Utah  on  September  20,  i860,  lie  was  at 
the  Naval  Academy  when  that  institution  was  transferred, 
temporarily,  from  Annapolis  to  Newport,  Rhode  Island, 
on  account  of  the  war.  The  term  of  his  class  at  the 
Academy  was  shortened  on  account  of  the  pressing 
necessity  for  officers,  and  he  became  ensign  on  Octo- 
ber 1,  1863.  Being  ordered  to  the  steam-frigate  "Pow- 
hatan," he  first  served   iii    the  West    India    Squadron, 


and  then,  in  1864-65,  in  the  North  Atlantic  Blockading 
Squadron. 

He  landed  with  the  force  of  seamen  and  marines  for 
the  land  assault  upon  Fort  Fisher,  ami  received  two 
severe  wounds  from  rifle-shots, -from  the  disabling  effects 
of  which  he  suffered  for  a  considerable  time. 

On  Jul\'  25,  1866,  he  was  commissioned  as  lieutenant, 
and  was,  during  that  year,  attached  to  the  navy-yard  at 
Philadelphia  ;  being  afterwards  transferred  to  ordnance 
duty  at  the  Washington  Navy- Yard. 

He  next  made  a  cruise  in  the  flag-ship  "  Piscataqua," 
of  the  Asiatic  Squadron,  from  1867  to  1869.  During 
this  cruise,  on  March  12,  1868,  he  was  promoted  to  be 
lieutenant-commander.  lie  was  attached,  with  this  rank, 
to  the  Washington  Navy- Yard,  1870-71  ;  and  to  the 
Naval  Academy  in  1871-72. 

From  1873  to  1876  he  cruised  in  the  " Shenandoah," 
second-rate,  and  the  "  Congress,"  second-rate,  of  the 
European  Squadron;  and,  during  ^^7/-/^,  was  in  com- 
mand of  the  training-ship  "  Saratoga." 

He  was  commissioned  commander  in  July,  1878,  and, 
after  service  at  the  Washington  Navy- Yard,  was  light- 
house inspector  from  1882  to  1886.  In  1886-87  he  was 
chief  inspector  of  steel  for  the  new  cruisers.  During 
1887-89  he  held  the  position  of  secretary  of  the  Light- 
House  Board. 

During  1890  he  was  on  leave  of  absence. 

He  was  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  "  Yorktown" 
in  July,  1891,  which  command  he  holds  at  present. 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


139 


CAPTAIN  AND  BREVET  MAJOR  EVARTS  S.  EWING, 
U.S.A.  (deceased). 

Captain  and  Brevet  Major  Evarts  S.  Ewing  was 
born  in  Giles  Count}',  Tennessee,  March  25,  1S41.  lie- 
always  had  a  strong  desire  to  go  through  West  Point, 
and  at  one  time  was  offered  an  appointment,  but  bravely 
declined  in  accordance  with  the  wishes  of  his  parents. 
They  hoped  he  might  continue  the  work  of  his  father 
in  the  Presbyterian  ministry.  However,  within  a  week- 
after  the  firing  on  Fort  Sumter,  Evarts  Ewing  was  riding 
over  the  country,  recruiting  a  company  of  volunteers  to 
enter  the  war  of  the  Rebellion.  Southern  born,  yet  his 
sympathies  were  with  his  country  and  the  State  which 
was  at  that  time  his  home. 

Through  his  efforts  and  those  of  a  few  others,  Com- 
pany D  of  the  First  Iowa  Cavalry  was  soon  formed,  and 
Evarts  Ewing  lacked  but  five  votes  of  being  made  the 
first  lieutenant.  He  was  then  offered  the  position  of 
second  lieutenant,  but  refused  it,  saying  he  would  carry 
a  musket  as  a  plain  private.  So  he  rode  away  only  bugler 
and  private  of  Company  D,  but  before  leaving  the  State- 
was  made  quartermaster-sergeant  of  the  regiment,  and 
for  a  time  had  sole  charge  of  that  department,  there  being 
no  commissioned  officer  over  him.  He  became  chief 
bugler  and  commissary-sergeant,  and  served  in  these 
grades  until  September  12,  1863.  His  campaigns  were 
for  the  most  part  west  of  the  Mississippi,  in  those  many 
smaller  engagements  which,  although  less  famous,  were 
none  the  less  heroically  fought  than  the  great  battles  with 
whose  names  we  are  more  familiar.  Perhaps  his  most 
marked  gallantry  was  shown  in  the  battle  of  Prairie 
Grove.  He  was  appointed  captain  and  commissary  of 
subsistence  January  13,  1805,  and  was  honorably  mus- 
tered out  October  9,  1865.  He  was  brevetted  major, 
lieutenant-colonel,  and  colonel  of  volunteers,  October  6 
of  the  same  year,  for  "faithful  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices." 

Colonel  Ewing  entered  the  regular  service  as  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Sixteenth  Infantry,  February  23,  1866, 
and  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  March  19  the  same- 
year.  The  brevets  of  captain  and  major,  U.  S.  Arm}', 
were  conferred  upon  him  March  2,  1867,  for  "gallant 
and  meritorious  services."  He  was  transferred  to  the 
Thirty-fourth  Infantry  September  21,  1866,  and  upon  the 
consolidation  of  regiments  was  transferred  back  to  his 
old  regiment,  the  Sixteenth,  in  which,  to  his  last  day,  he 
always  maintained  the  greatest  pride  and  interest. 

He  was  serving  in  Washington  in  1867  as  aide-de-camp 
to  General  O.  O.  Howard,  when  General  Joseph  A.  Mower 
applied  to  the  War  Department  for  an  especially  efficient 
and  responsible  man  to  act  as  department  quartermaster 
on  his  staff,  and  Major  Ewing  was  relieved  of  his  position 
on  General  Howard's  staff  to  fill  this  place  on  General 
Mower's. 


Since  then  he  served  with  his  regiment  at  the  various 
posts  where  he  was  stationed.  He  was  on  duty  in 
New  Orleans  in  1876  during  the  famous  White  League 
troubles,  and  later  at  different  posts  of  the  Indian  Ter- 
ritory, Kansas,  and  Texas.  He  served  as  regimental 
quartermaster  of  the  Sixteenth  Infantry  from  March  9, 
1880,  to  April  30,  1880,  when  he  was  promoted  to  captain 
of  Company  15. 

Major  Ewing  was  retired  from  active  service  the  3d  of 
January,   1885,  for  disability  in  line  of  duty  (sec.   1251 
rev.  stat.). 

In  May,  1885,  Major  Ewing  was  honored  by  an  invi- 
tation from  the  board  of  managers  of  the  World's  Fair 
in  New  Orleans  to  take  command  of  the  large  inter- 
state encampment  of  militia  to  take  place  at  the  close  of 
the  exposition.  He  accepted  the  offer,  and  won  a  most 
enviable  reputation  among  all  who  understood  military 
matters. 

Among  many  other  honors,  Major  Ewing  might  claim 
that  of  being  the  father  of  target  practice  in  the  U.  S. 
Army,  it  being  through  his  letters,  written  to  the  Army 
and  Navy  Journal,  and  the  example  he  set  by  his  untiring 
efforts  in  that  direction  in  his  own  company,  that  the  War 
Department  first  became  interested  in  what  is  to-day  so 
prominent  a  feature  of  our  arm}-.  Major  Ewing  was  the 
first  commissioned  officer  in  the  Department  of  Texas  to 
be  given  a  marksman's  button. 

His  nature  was  a  remarkable  combination  of  the  poet 
and  the  soldier  ;  from  childhood  his  highest  aims  were  in 
a  military  line,  but  next  to  this  he  hoped  to  achieve  fame 
in  the  literary  world. 

Shortly  after  his  distinguished  services  at  the  New 
Orleans  encampment,  he  received  an  offer  from  the  Presi- 
dent of  Honduras  to  take  command  of  the  armies  of  that 
republic.  This  offer,  for  various  personal  reasons,  he 
reluctantly  declined  to  accept.     He  died  June  7,  1892. 


140 


OFFICERS  OF  THE  ARMY  AND  XAVY  (regular) 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  J.    P.    FARLEY.   U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  J.  P.  Farley  (Ordnance  Corps, 
U.  S.  Army)  was  born  in  Washington,  1).  C,  March  2, 
1839.  He  was  graduated  at  the  U.  S.  Militar}  Academy 
June  24,  [861;  assigned  to  the  Second  U.  S.  Artil- 
lery, and  transferred  to  the  <  )rdnance  Corps  October  24, 
1 86 1. 

I;,  fore  and  during  the  Bull  Run  campaign  he  served 
as  aide  on  the  staff  of  the  general  commanding  the  de- 
fences of  Washington,  and  later,  during  the  summer  and 
fill  of  thai  year,  with  Horse  Battery  A,  Second  Artillery, 
covei  ing  the  appn  iai  lies  t<  1  Washingti  in  and  Alexandria, 
Virginia. 

Special  Order  No.  174,  Folly  Island,  South  Carolina, 
[uly  8,  [863,  was  indorsed  by  Lieutenant-Colonel  R.  H. 
[ackson,  captain  First  LJ.  S.  Artillery,  as  follows:  "Lieu- 
tenant Farley  reported  to  me  in  obedience  to  the  within 
order,  and  remained  on  duty  in  charge  of  one-half  of  the 
battel ies  of  the  hunt  line  until  the  capture  by  our  tr< iops 
of  the  south  end  of   Morris  Island  on  July   IO,  1863. 

"  I  hike  pleasure  in  testifying  that  to  his  ability,  ex- 
ample, and  gallant  conduit  in  the  action  of  the  10th  of 
July,  1S63,  which  resulted  in  the  capture  of  Morris  Island, 
the  splendid  practice,  the  admirable  sighting,  and  the 
destructive  effects  oi  the  artillery  under  his  command 
were  in  a  great  measure  due. 

"  This  conduct  was  the  more  praiseworthy  on  his  part, 
as  he  volunteered  to  command  troops  on  that  occasion 
out  of  the  line  of  his  duty  as  an  ordnance  officer. 

"  Lieutenant  Farley's  name  received  highly  honorable 
mention  in  my  report  ('War  of  Rebellion  Records,'  Vol. 
XXVIII.)  of  the  part  taken  by  the  artillery  under  my 
command  in  the  capture  of  the  south  end  of  Morris 
Island." 

Lieutenant   Farley  again  volunteered  his  servii 
aide  to  General  Truman  Seymour  during  the  bombard- 


ment and  assault  on  Fort  Wagner,  South  Carolina,  July 
18,  1863.  The  general  in  indorsing  the  foregoing  order, 
No.  174,  says:  "Lieutenant  Farley  was  a  member  of  my 
staff  during  a  considerable  part  of  that  summer  (  1863). 
lie  was  one  of  the  most  active,  intelligent,  and  useful  of 
my  right-hand  assistants  and  advisers, — was  always  ready 
for  any  labor,  however  toilsome  and  disagreeable,  and 
assuredly  the-  work  of  the  artillerist  and  ordnance  officer 
on  Foll_\- and  Moiris  Islands  during  that  eventful  summer 
was  very  trying;  lie  was  patient  and  persevering  under 
unusual  difficulties;  he  was,  in  fact,  one  of  the  compara- 
tively  few  of  whom,  when  charged  with  the  accomplish- 
ment of  ail}'  special  duty,  I  was  absolutely  sure  it  would 
be  conducted  skilfully  to  its  desired  end." 

( reneral  Seymour,  in  an  official  report,  "  War  of  Rebel- 
lion Record,"  Vol.  XXVIII.,  referring  to  a  successful 
engagement  with  the  enemy  on  Morris  Island,  South 
Carolina,  accords  to  Lieutenant  Farley  "  no  small  share 
of  the  glory  of  this  day." 

The  later  service  of  Lieutenant  Farley  (1864-65)  with 
Lieutenant-General  U.  S.  Grant  was  recognized  by  the 
general  in  the  following  terms:  "  I  take  pleasure  in  tes- 
tifying to  your  efficiency  as  an  ordnance  officer  while 
serving  in  the  armies  operating  against  Richmond. 

"  During  the  time  you  were  in  charge  of  the  extensive 
and  very  important  Ordnance  Depot  at  City  Point, Vir- 
ginia, your  duties  were  performed  to  my  entire  satisfac- 
tion, anil,  as  far  as  my  official  and  personal  knowledge 
extend,  to  the  perfect  satisfaction  of  the  armies  you 
supplied." 

In  this  connection,  revelling  to  the  field  service  of 
Lieutenant  Farley,  General  Seymour  says:  "  Approved, 
as  it  has  been,  by  the  greatest  of  our  commanders,  my 
own  commendations  are  of  little  value  in  comparison; 
but  the)-  are  the  expressions  of  a  profound  appreciation 
of  all  that  can  confer  honor  and  distinction  upon  one  of 
the  most  worthy  young  officers  I  knew  during  the  war." 

Lieutenant  Farley  was  brevctted  captain  "  for  meri- 
torious services  in  the  Ordnance  Department  during  the 
war,"  and  his  field  service  is  recognized  in  orders  and 
reports,  "  War  of  the  Rebellion  Records,"  Vol.  XXVIII. 

Since  the  war  he  has  served  at  the  Military  Academy  ; 
at  arsenals,  foundries,  proving  grounds,  and  on  various 
boards,  such  as  the  Ordnance  Board,  the  Experimental 
Testing  Board,  and  a  Board  for  the  Selection  of  a  Maga- 
zine Small-Arm  lor  the  Service.  He  is  the  author  of 
"Professional  and  Scientific  Papers,"  published  by  the 
War  Department,  anil  for  which  work  he  has  received 
official  commendation. 

Colonel  Farley  is  the  son  of  Captain  John  Farley  (Class 
of  [823,  U.  S.  M.  A.),  First  U.  S.  Artillery;  grandson  of 
Captain  John  Farley,  LT.  S.  Corps  of  Artillery,  War  of 
1812;  and  great-grandson  of  Robert  Breat,  paymaster- 
general,  Lr.  S.  A.,  [819. 


W/fO   SERVED   IN  THE   CI  VIE    WAR. 


141 


CAPTAIN  NORMAN  H.  FARQUHAR,  U.S.N. 

Captain  Nokman  II.  Farquhar  is  at  present  chief  of 
the  Bureau  of  Yards  and  Docks,  Navy  Department,  with 
the  rank  of  commodore.  He  was  born  in  Pennsylvania 
April  1  1,  1S40,  and  graduated  from  the  Naval  Academy 
in  1859.  While  still  a  midshipman,  serving  in  different 
vessels  of  our  African  Squadron,  he  was  detailed  to  bring 
to  the  United  States  a  captured  slaver,  the  "Triton," 
with  a  crew  of  ten  men  and  no  other  officer.  Still  a 
midshipman  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  great  Rebellion, 
he  became  lieutenant  in  a  very  few  months,  and  served 
on  board  the  steamer  "  Mystic"  and  the  steam  gun-boat 
"Mahaska,"  of  the  North  Atlantic  Squadron;  the 
steamer  "  Rhode  Island,"  of  the  West  India  Squadron; 
and  the  "Santiago  de  Cuba,"  of  the  North  Atlantic 
Squadron.  Lieutenant  Farquhar  was  present  at  both 
attacks  upon  Fort  Fisher,  and  there  and  elsewhere  was 
distinguished  for  his  coolness  and  conduct  under  fire. 
General  B.  F.  Butler,  in  his  official  report  of  the  attack  on 
Fort  Fisher,  North  Carolina,  dated  January  3,  1865, 
speaks  of  Captain  Farquhar  (then  lieutenant)  as  follows  : 
"  Lieutenant  Farquhar,  of  the  navy,  having  in  charge  the 
navy  boats  which  assisted  in  the  landing,  deserves  great 
credit  for  the  energy  and  skill  with  which  he  managed 
the  boats  through  the  rolling  surf." 

In  [865  he  was  promoted  to  be  lieutenant-commander, 
and  then  served  for  some  time  at  the  Naval  Academy. 
He  next  served  in  the  "Swatara,"  on  the  European 
Station,  in  1868-69;  anc'  a*:  tne  navy-yard,  Boston,  in 
1870,  being  thence  ordered  as  executive-officer  of  the 
United  States  steamship  "Severn,"  from  which  ship  he 
went  to  the  command  of  the  "Kansas,"  and  was  em- 
ployed in  surveying  duties.  After  another  tour  of  service 
at  the  Boston  Navy- Yard,  he  joined  the  United  States 
steamship  "Powhatan"  in  1X72,  and  on  December  12 
of  that  year  was  made  commander  in  the  navy.  He 
was  then  stationed  at  the  Naval  Academy,  at  Annapolis, 
in  command  of  the  "Santee,"  and  in  charge  of  buildings 
and  grounds  for  about  six  years;  commanding  the 
"Portsmouth"  in  1878,  and  in  command  of  "Quinne- 
baug"  and  "Wyoming,"  European  Squadron,  from  [878 
to  1881.  He  then  became  commandant  of  "cadets"  at 
the  Naval  Academy,  in  which  position  he  remained  five 
years;  commanding  the  "Constellation"  on  the  practice 
cruise  with  the  midshipmen  in  1883  and  1884. 

He  was  commissioned  as  captain  March  4,  [886,  and 
was  ordered  to  command  the  flag-ship  "Trenton,"  in  the 


Pacific.  The  country  will  long  remember  the  wreck  of 
the  "Trenton"  ami  other  vessels  at  Apia,  Samoa,  during 
a  dreadful  hurricane.  On  this  occasion,  by  good  seaman- 
ship, Captain  Farquhar  saved  the  lives  of  the  four  hun- 
dred and  fifty  officers  and  men  who  composed  the  ship's 
company. 

For  his  services  on  this  occasion  the  Humane  Society 
of  Massachusetts  awarded  Captain  Farquhar  its  gold 
medal,  with  a  letter  couched  in  very  complimentary 
terms.  Captain  Farquhar  has  probably  commanded 
more  vessels  than  any  officer  of  his  grade,  but  has  held 
no  command  afloat  since  that  of  the  "Trenton."  In 
August,  1889,  he  was  senior  member  of  the  Board  of 
Visitors  at  the  Torpedo  Station,  Newport,  and  was 
appointed  a  member  of  the  Light-House  Board  in  the 
latter  part  of  the  same  year,  but  did  not  serve  long  in 
that  capacity,  as  he  was,  on  March  6,  1890,  appointed 
chief  of  the  Bureau  of  Yards  and  Docks  at  the  Navy 
Department,  as  we  have  said  above.  Commodore  Far- 
quhar is  the  holder  of  a  gold  medal  from  the  Naval 
Institute,  given  in  1885,  for  an  essay  entitled  "Induce- 
ments for  Obtaining  Seamen  in  the  Navy."  Many  of 
the  suggestions  contained  in  that  paper  have  since  been 
adopted  by  the  department.  "  Captain  Farquhar  is 
universally  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  accomplished, 
progressive,  and  trustworthy  officers  in  the  navy.  Like 
all  men  of  capacity  and  courage,  he  is  considerate  to 
those  under  him,  while  exacting  prompt  obedience  to 
official  orders." 


142 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


ADMIRAL   DAVID   GLASGOW   FARRAGUT,  U.S.N. 
(dei  eased). 

It  seems  hopeless,  in  the  brief  space  allotted,  to  even 
mention  the  points  in  the  career  of  this  distinguished 
head  of  our  navy;  but,  fortunately,  the  whole  country, 
and  the  whole  world,  indeed,  is  familiar  with  them,  and 
everywhere — from  the  Winter  Palace  at  St.  Petersburg 
to  the  fisherman's  hut  upon  the  shores  of  the  Pacific — his 
likeness  is  to  be  found.  Farragut  was  wounded  in  the 
bloody  battle  between  the  "  Essex"  and  the  British  ships 
"Phoebe"  and  "Cherub,"  in  March,  i S 1 4 ,  when  his 
commanding  officer  regretted  "that  he  was  too  young 
for  promotion."  He  lived  to  command  at  New  Orleans, 
Vicksburg,  and  Mobile  Bay,  and  yet  was  only  sixty-nine 
whenhedied.  But  very  much  was  compressed  into  those 
years.  lie  served  in  three  wars,  as  well  as  against  the 
West  Indian  pirates,  and  he  observed  the  military  and 
naval  operations  of  his  time  throughout  the  world  with 
his  native  sagacity, all  of  which  tended  to  ripen  his  mind 
for  the  great  work  before  him.  Admiral  Farragut  was  a 
di  cendant  of  Don  Pedro  Ferragut,  called  "El  Conquis- 
tador," from  his  successes  in  battle  against  the  Moors 
of  Spain.  They  had  estates  in  Minorca,  and  his  father 
was  born  there,  and  emigrated  to  America  in  1776. 
He  took  part  in  the  war  of  the  Revolution,  and  was  the 
friend  and  companion  of  General  fackson  during  his 
Indian  campaigns.  He  married  in  North  Carolina,  set- 
tled in  Tennessee,  where  his  distinguished  son  was  born, 
and  finally  entered  the  naval  service  as  sailing-master. 

Admiral  Farragut,  through  Commodore  David  Porter, 
received  his  midshipman's  warrant  when  less  than  ten 
years  old.  and  in  1S11  he  went  to  sea  with  Porter.  When 
the  ship's  company  of  the  "  Essex"  returned  to  the 
I  hiited  States  in  the  cartel  "  Essex  Junior"  he  was  pi 
at     1  hool  until  the  peace  of   1  S  1  5 . 


He  then  made  two  cruises  to  the  Mediterranean,  avail- 
ing himself  of  favorable  opportunities  for  study  and  travel. 
Under  his  old  commander,  Porter,  he  served  during 
1823-24,  in  the  suppression  of  piracy  in  the  West  Indies, 
and  always  took  pride  in  having  obtained  a  command 
then  at  the  age  of  twenty-two.  In  1S25  he  was  a  lieu- 
tenant of  the  "  Brandy  wine,"  w  hen  she  took  Lafayette 
home.  He  served  on  the  coast  of  Brazil  as  executive- 
officer  of  the  "  Delaware,"  seventy-four,  and  in  command 
of  two  vessels.  While  in  command  of  the  "  Erie,"  in  the 
Gulf,  he  noted  carefully  the  French  bombardment  of 
Vera  Cruz.  Served  in  our  own  war  with  Mexico,  in  the 
"Saratoga;"  then  on  ordnance,  court-martial,  and  navy- 
yard  duties.  In  I S54  he  was  sent  to  California  to  estab- 
lish the  navy-yard  at  Mare  Island.  During  his  four- 
years'  service  there  his  coolness  and  judgment  in  deal- 
ing with  the  delicate  question  of  Federal  and  State 
jurisdiction,  during  the  reign  of  the  "Vigilance  Com- 
mittee" of  1856,  not  only  saved  the  government  from 
being  drawn  into  a  local  quarrel,  but  also  saved  blood- 
shed. During  1859-60  Farragut  commanded  the 
"  Brooklyn,"  and,  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  great  Re- 
bellion, was  living  in  Norfolk,  Virginia,  as  he  had  done 
for  many  years.  Local  opinion  and  local  pressure  had 
no  effect  upon  a  man  of  his  broad  views,  and  he  moved 
to  the  North,  and  took'  up  his  residence  on  the  Hudson. 
In  January,  1862,  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of 
the  West  Gulf  Squadron,  his  mission  being  to  unseal 
that  great  artery  of  commerce  ami  travel,  the  Missis- 
sippi, and  all  that  such  an  undertaking  entailed.  He 
seemed  confident  of  success  from  the  first,  great  as  the 
task  before  him  was.  He  wrote:  "As  to  being  pre- 
pared for  defeat,  I  certainly  am  not.  Any  man  who  is 
prepared  for  defeat  would  be  half-defeated  before  he 
commenced.  I  hope  for  success,  shall  do  all  in  my 
power  to  secure  it,  and  trust  in  God  for  the  rest."  The 
result  of  that  continual  strain  of  combat  for  so  man}' 
months  is  a  matter  of  common-school  history,  ami  need 
not  be  recounted  here.  The  same  may  be  said  of  his 
operations  at  Mobile  Bay  in  1804.  He  received  the 
thanks  of  Congress,  and  was  commissioned  rear-admiral 
July  K>,  i,Xf>2;  vice-admiral  December  21,  1864,  and 
was  finally  promoted  to  the  rank  of  admiral  Jul)-  26, 
1866.  In  1867  he  went  to  the  command  of  the  Euro- 
pean Squadron,  and  made  an  extended  cruise,  being 
everywhere  received  with  the  most  marked  attention. 
At  this  time,  when  past  sixty-six,  Admiral  Farragut,  with 
his  rounded,  active  figure,  and  firm,  clean-shaven  face, 
gave  one  the  impression  of  being  a  much  younger  man. 
He  spoke  several  languages  very  fluently,  and  was  a 
very  close  observer,  ami  an  indefatigable  reader.  Noth- 
ing escaped  his  keen  eve,  and  when  he  felt  himself  among 
friends  his  observations  were  often  very  dry  and  even 
witty.      He  died  on  August  14,  1870. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


143 


REAR-ADMIRAL  JOHN  C.    FEBIGER,    U.S.N. 
(retired). 

Rear-Admiral  John  C.  Febiger  was  born  in  Penn- 
sylvania and  appointed  from  Ohio,  his  warrant  as  mid- 
shipman bearing  date  of  September  14,  1838.  His  first 
service  was  in  the  frigate  "  Macedonian,"  of  the  West 
India  Squadron,  1838-40.  He  was  then  attached  to  the 
sloop-of-war  "  Concord,"  mostly  upon  the  Brazil  coast, 
during  1841-43.  In  the  latter  year  he  was  wrecked  in 
the  "  Concord"  on  the  east  coast  of  Africa,  and  was  then 
attached  to  the  brig  "  Chippola,"  purchased  by  the  gov- 
ernment at  Rio  Janeiro  and  used  to  recover  and  dispose 
of  the  equipment  of  the  "  Concord."  Engaged  in  this 
duty  until  1844.  On  May  20  of  that  year  he  was  made 
passed  midshipman,  and  served  in  the  frigate  "  Potomac," 
of  the  Home  Squadron,  for  two  years.  He  then  made  a 
cruise  to  the  Pacific  in  the  sloop-of-war  "  Dale,"  and  was 
from  her  transferred  to  the  "  Columbus,"  74,  in  which 
ship  he  came  home. 

Again  attached  to  the  sloop-of-war  "  Dale,"  he  made 
a  cruise  upon  the  coast  of  Africa,  and  upon  his  return 
was  employed  upon  the  Coast  Survey  for  several  years. 

He  was  promoted  to  master  1852,  and  was  commis- 
sioned lieutenant  in  the  navy  April  30,  1853.  In  1858-60 
he  was  attached  to  the  sloop-of-war  "  Germantown,"  of 
the  Past  India  Squadron,  and  upon  his  return,  in  1 861, 
was  ordered  to  the  sloop-of-war  "  Savannah." 

Commissioned  commander  in  the  navy  August  11, 
1862.  Commanded  the  "Kanawha,"  of  the  West  Gulf 
Blockading  Squadron,  in  1862-63,  and  was  in  the  en- 
gagement off  Mobile  Bay  April  3,  1862. 

During  the  year  1863  Commander  Febiger  com- 
manded the  "  Osage,"  "  Neosho,"  and  "  Dafayette,"  of 
the  Mississippi  Squadron ;  and  in  1864-65  commanded 
the  "  Mattabeset,"  of  the  North  Atlantic  Blockading 
Squadron.     During  this  period   he   participated   in   the 


spirited  engagement  with  the  rebel  ram  "  Albemarle,"  in 
Albemarle  Sound,  Ma)-,  1S64. 

In  the  years  1866-68  he  commanded  the  "  Ashuelot," 
of  the  Asiatic  Squadron. 

Commissioned  captain  May  6,  1868,  and  commanded 
the  steam-sloop  "  Shenandoah,"  of  the  Asiatic  Squadron, 
in  1868-69.  While  commanding  the  "  Shenandoah"  he 
entered  and  surveyed  Ping-Yang  Inlet,  on  the  west  coast 
of  Corea. 

From  1869  to  1872  he  was  inspector  of  naval  reserved 
lands.  In  1872-74  he  commanded  the  U.  S.  steamer 
"  Omaha,"  of  the  South  Pacific  Squadron.  He  was  pro- 
moted to  commodore  August  9,  1874.  After  this  he 
became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Examiners,  and  then 
commandant  of  the  navy-yard  at  Washington,  D.  C,  for 
nearly  four  years.  He  was  then  upon  special  duty  in 
Washington,  D.  C,  and  a  member  of  the  Retiring  Board. 

Promoted  to  rear-admiral  February  4,  1882.  Retired 
upon  his  own  application  July  1,  1882. 


144 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  {regular) 


MAJOR  E.   G.   FECHET,   U.S.A. 

Major  E.  G.  Fechet  (Sixth  Cavalry)  was  born  July 
i  i,  1844,  in  Michigan.  1  le  is  the  son  of  Alfred  Edmond 
Fechet,  M.D.,  a  native  of  France,  and  graduate  of  the 
College  of  France,  who  came  to  the  United  States  in 
1840. 

Young  Feehet  entered  the  volunteer  service  June  19, 
1861,  as  sergeant  of  Company  A,  Seventh  Michigan  In- 
fantry, and  participated  in  the  Maryland  campaign  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in  the  battle  of 
Antietam,  September  17,  1862,  at  which  time  he  was  shot 
through  the  right  lung.  He  was  promoted  second  lieu- 
tenant, to  date  from  that  battle,  and  first  lieutenant  June 
iS,  [863.  He  resigned  June  31,  1863,  on  account  of 
illness  resulting  from  his  wound.  On  recover}-,  he  again 
entered  the  volunteer  service  as  quartermaster-sergeant 
of  the  Tenth  Michigan  Cavalry,  but  was  promoted  sec- 
ond lieutenant  January  23,  1804,  and  'first  lieutenant 
April  1,  1865.  He  was  in  several  minor  engagements 
in  [864,  in  East  Tennessee,  and  commanded  the  Knox- 
ville  Depot  of  Ordnance  November,  [865,  and  was  hon- 
orably mustered  out  of  service  November  21,  1865.  He 
was  appointed  to  regular  service  as  second  lieutenant  of 
Eighth  Cavalry  July  28,  1866,  and  brevetted  first  lieu- 
tenant and  captain  March  2,  1 867,  "  for  gallant  conduct 
at  the  battle  of  Antietam."  In  February  marched  in 
command  oi  Troop  I  from  San  Francisco  to  Fort 
Whipple,  Arizona,  and  participated  in  a  severe  fight  with 
the  Hualapi  and  Tonto  Apache  Indians.  He  was  pro- 
moted first  lieutenant  July  31,  1867, and  captain  May  J3, 
1870. 

Rejoining  his  regiment  in  January,  [ 870,  he  tools  •  om- 
mand  of  Troop  G,  anjd  changed  stations  to  New  Mexico, 
arriving  at  Fort  Selden  in  the  March  following.  Captain 
Fechet  commandei  I  .1  deta<  hmenl  of  troops  in  an  engage- 
ment with  the  Mescalero  Apaches,  capturing  their  entire 


camp  and  herd,  and  forcing  the  tribe  to  return  to  Stan- 
ton reservation.  He  marched  with  his  regiment  to  Texas, 
on  change  of  department,  arriving  at  Ringgold  Barracks 
in  March,  1  S76,  where  he  remained  to  i88i,\vhen  he  was 
transferred  to  Fort  Clark,  which  post  he  did  duty  at  until 
September,  1887.  Then  he  commanded  Camp  Pena 
Colorado  to  May,  1888,  when  he  marched  with  his  regi- 
ment from  Texas  to  Dakota.  He  left  Pena  Colorado 
on  the  19th  of  May,  and  arrived  at  Fort  Yates,  North 
Dakota,  September  17,  the  distance  marched  being  two 
thousand  one  hundred  miles. 

While  in  command  of  his  troop  at  Fort  Yates,  Captain 
Fechet  became  somewhat  conspicuous  in  the  Sioux  cam- 
paign of  1890-91,  by  having  been  engaged  in  the  affair 
which  resulted  in  the  death  of  the  famous  chief  Sitting 
Bull,  having  on  that  occasion  commanded  the  troops 
participating  therein.  The  following  extract  from  a 
communication  from  General  Miles,  in  the  field,  on  this 
subject,  to  General  Thomas  H.  Ruger,  commanding  the 
department  of  Dakota,  is  here  given  : 

"The  division  commander  has  received  official  report 
of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Drum,  Twelfth  Infantry,  and 
Captain  Fechet,  Eighth  Cavalry,  regarding  the  arrest  of 
Sitting  Bull.  He  desires  me  to  express  his  approval  of 
the  good  judgment  displayed  by  the  officers  and  the 
assistance  of  agent,  the  fortitude  of  the  troops  and 
bravery  of  the  Indian  police.  It  required  no  ordinary 
courage  to  go  into  an  Indian  camp  of  well-armed  war- 
riors and  arrest  the  chief  conspirator  on  the  eve  of  his 
departure  to  join  the  large  body  of  his  followers  then  in 
defiant  hostility  to  the  government,  and  engaged  in  rob- 
bing  its  citizens  and  looting  their  houses.  It  was  from 
Sitting  Bull  that  emissaries  have  been  for  months  going 
to  other  tribes  inciting  them  to  hostility,  and  he  died 
while  resisting  the  lawful  officials  of  the  government. 
Even  after  lie  had  been  peaceably  arrested,  he  raised  the 
cry  of  revolt,  and  incited  his  men  to  shoot  down  the 
government  police  in  the  lawful  discharge  of  their  duty. 
The  fearless  action  of  Captain  Fechet  and  his  command 
entitles  them  to  great  credit,  and  the  celerity  of  his 
movements  showed  the  true  soldierly  spirit. 

"  The  division  commander  desires  that  his  sympathy 
be  expressed  to  those  who  have  suffered  from  wounds, 
and  the  families  of  the  dead  brave,  loyal,  Indian  police, 
and  his  thanks  to  all  who  took  part  in  the  arrest  that  lias 
already  resulted  in  the  surrender  of  more  than  one  hun- 
dred defiant,  lawless  savages,  and  with  other  measures 
has  done  much  to  prevent  the  destruction  of  many  peace- 
able homes  and  innocent  lives.  By  command  of  Major- 
<  '.('ilir.il  Miles.  (Signed) 

M.  1'.  Mais,  A.D.C." 

Captain  Fechet  was  promoted  major  of  the  Sixth 
Cavalry  April  20,  [891, 


WHO   SERVED    IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


145 


CAPTAIN  EDWARD   FIELD.   U.S.A. 

Captain  Edward  Field  (Fourth  Artillery)  traces  his 
lineage  in  unbroken  thread  from  the  distinguished  as- 
tronomer and  student,  Sir  John  Field,  to  whose  researches 
England  was  indebted  for  the  explanation  and  intro- 
duction of  the  Copernican  system.  Emigrating  from 
the  mother-country  long  before  the  revolt  of  the  infant 
colonies,  his  ancestors  were  among  the  first  to  take  up 
arms  against  the  sea  of  troubles  which  so  crowded  upon 
the  young  republic  at  its  birth.  Richard  Stockton, 
member  of  the  Continental  Congress  and  signer  of  the 
Declaration  of  Independence,  was  his  great-great-grand- 
father. 

Richard  Stockton  Field,  attorney-general  of  the  State 
of  New  Jersey,  United  States  Senator,  and  United  States 
District  Judge,  was  the  father  of  Captain  Field,  and  a 
resident  of  the  classic  old  town  of  Princeton  when,  in 
1 84 1,  the  son  was  born  who  became  the  first  of  the 
family  to  permanently  identify  himself  with  the  army  of 
the  nation.  Naturally  no  Princeton  lad  thought  of  going 
elsewhere  for  education,  and  it  was  at  the  time-honored 
college  of  his  native  place  that  Edward  Field  was  matric- 
ulated in  1857,  and  graduated  in  [861,  just  at  the  out- 
break of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion.  Always  an  enthusi- 
astic horseman,  he  lost  no  time  in  seeking  service  with 
the  cavalry,  and  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  in 
the  gallant  First  New  Jersey  that  won  such  renown  in 
the  old  Second  Division  of  the  Cavalry  Corps  in  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac.  Early  in  1862,  however,  he  was 
tendered  an  appointment  in  the  Fourth  Artillery  of  the 
regular  army,  and  within  a  month  had  joined  Light 
Battery  "  C"  of  that  regiment  just  in  time  to  embark  for 
the  Peninsula. 

Fair  Oaks,  Peach  Orchard,  and  Savage  Station  gave 
him  man)-  an  opportunity  of  testing  the  metal  of  which 
he  was  made.  But  White  Oak  Swamp  was  the  fight 
that  tried  men's  souls,  so  far  at  least  as  Battery  "  C" 
was  concerned.  For  hours  its  eight  guns  were  hotly 
engaged.  Hazzard,  its  brave  and  impetuous  commander, 
received  his  death-wound,  and  Field's  comrade,  Lieu- 
tenant Arthur  Morris,  was  knocked  lwrs  de  combat,  while 
men  and  horses  suffered  severely  from  the  deadly  fire  of 
the  enemy. 

Antietam,  Halltown,  Fredericksburg,  and  Chancellors- 
ville  were  the  next  battles  in  order  ;  and  in  the  last  named 
Field  won  high  credit  and  the  thanks  of  General  Geary 
for  fighting  his  battery,  even  after  it  was  relieved,  and 
hammering  the  rebel  infantry  an  entire  hour  at  close 
range  despite  heavy  losses.  This  was  at  the  Chancellor 
House  salient. 

In    October,    1863,  Lieutenant   Field  was    transferred 
to  Horse    Battery  "  E"  of   his    regiment,  fighting   with 
it  at  Buckland   Mills  and  Raccoon  Ford,  following  the 
'9 


cavalry  on  Sheridan's  raid,  and  backing  them  in  all 
the  stirring  combats  at  Todd's  Tavern,  Spottsylvania, 
and  Yellow  Tavern,  and  winning  another  brevet  at 
Meadow  Bridge,  not  far  from  the  field  where  his  first 
was  gained  at  White  ( )ak  Swamp. 

The  war  over,  the  Fourth  had  a  spell  of  rest  and  a 
hard  time  transforming  horse-battery  men  into  garrison 
gunners.  They  were  sent  to  the  Pacific  coast  just  in 
time  to  be  ordered  into  the  lava  beds  against  the  Modocs, 
ami  to  lose  four  gallant  officers  and  a  score  of  men  in 
that  thankless  and  inglorious  warfare.  Field  took  his 
full  share  of  the  campaign  ;  had  another  touch  of  frontier 
duty  in  1877,  when  sent  after  Chief  Joseph  and  the  Nez 
Perces,  and  still  again  was  ordered  down  into  Arizona, 
where  the  Apaches  of  the  Siena  Blanca  had  their  out- 
break in  1 88  1. 

This  concluded  the  frontier  service  of  the  Fourth,  for 
the  time  being  at  least.  But  Field  was  of  too  active  a 
temperament  to  stagnate  in  a  stone  fort,  when  once  again 
they  appeared  on  the  Atlantic  coast.  In  such  time  as  his 
duties  would  permit  he  devoted  himself  to  the  instruction 
of  the  neighboring  National  Guardsmen,  proving  always 
a  welcome  visitor  at  their  camps  and  armories.  In  1882 
lie  was  detailed  to  visit  and  inspect  the  troops  of  Rhode 
Island;  in  18X4,  of  New  York;  in  1886,  of  Maine;  and 
his  reports  on  their  condition  and  efficiency  were  widely 
read. 

The  captain  has  achieved  literary  honor  in  other  fields, 
having  been  selected  to  deliver  the  Decoration  Day 
address  at  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  in  1882,  and  having 
subsequently  addressed  the  National  Guard  Association 
of  New  York  in  18S4;  the  West  Point  Association  in 
July,  1882,  and  the  Military  Service  Institute,  at  Gov- 
ernor's Island,  in  1885. 

For  some  time  past  Captain  Field  has  been  stationed 
at  the  new  Fort  McPherson,  close  to  Atlanta. 


I4'J 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  [regular) 


CAPTAIN  M.  J.  FITZ    GERALD,   U.S.A.  (retired). 

Captain  M.  J.  Fitz  Gerald  was  born  in  Athlone, 
County  Westmeath,  Ireland,  September  24,  1837.  He 
arrived  in  Baltimore,  Maryland,  about  1847  or  1848. 
He  enlisted  January  5.  1855,  at  Fort  McHenry,  Alan- 
land,  and  was  assigned  to  Company  E,  First  Artil- 
lery, at  Fortress  Monroe,  Virginia.  He  was  ordered  to 
Florida  with  his  company  in  the  winter  of  1855—56,  and 
served  during  the  war  against  Billy  Bowlegs  and  his  tribe, 
part  of  the  time  as  acting  hospital  .steward  in  the  field. 
1  [e  was  then  ordered  with  his  company  to  Fort  Moultrie, 
South  Carolina,  in  the  fall  of  1858,  and  performed  the 
duties  of  hospital  steward  during-  the  epidemic  of  yellow 
fever  at  that  post.  I  [e  was  promoted  corporal  Company 
E,  First  Artillery,  in  1858,  and  discharged  in  November, 
[859.  He  re-enlisted,  and  was  transferred  to  the  Ord- 
nance Corps  in  January,  [ 860,  and  was  assigned  to  duty  at 
['.  S.  Arsenal,  Charleston,  South  Carolina,  lie  remained 
thereuntil  the  surrender  of  the  arsenal  to  the  State  of 
South  Carolina,  December  30,  i860  (as  artificer  and  act- 
ing fii  it  sergeant  of  the  detachment).  The  disagreeable 
duty  devolved  upon  him  to  lower — the  fust  time  in  its 
history — our  flag  in  the  presence  of  trait,  irs.  I  Ie  remained 
a  prisoner  in  the  arsenal  until  after  the  firing  on  the  "Star 
of  the  West,"  when  he  proceeded  to  the  U.  S.  Arsenal  at 
Augusta,  Georgia,  reporting  to  Captain  Elsie,  late  Second 
U.  S.  Artillery.  I  Ie  remained  there  until  the  surrender  of 
the  arsenal,  and  was   then  ordered  to  Washington    D.  C.    I 


where  he  was  discharged,  at  his  own   request,  to  enable 
him  to  accept  a  position  under  the  State  of  South  Caro- 
lina;   but,    instead,    he    proceeded    to    Fort    McHenry, 
Maryland,  and  enlisted,  and  was  then  appointed  hospital 
steward  at  that  post.     From  there  he  was  transferred,  as 
chief  hospital  steward,  to  the  general  hospital  at  Fred- 
erick, Maryland,  until  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the 
Ninth  Infantry,  and  ordered  to  duty  with  his  company, 
C,  at  San  Juan  Island,  Washington  Territory,  June,  1863  ; 
he  remained  on  duty,  in  joint  military  occupation  of  the 
group  of  islands  with  the  British  troops,  until  October, 
[865,  when  he  was  relieved  and  ordered  to  the  Presidio 
1  'I  San  Francisco,  California,  and  assigned  to  duty  as  post 
adjutant,  acting  commissary  of  subsistence,  and   acting 
stant  quartermaster   until   May,  1866,  when  relieved 
and  ordered  to  Fort  Bidwell,  California,  relieving  compa- 
nies of  the  Second  California  Cavalry.     He  commanded 
the  post,  consisting  of  Companies  C,  Ninth  Infantry,  and 
A,  First  Cavalry,  and  performed  the  duty  of  acting  assist- 
ant commissaiy  of  subsistence  and  acting  assistant  quar- 
termaster until  the  middle  of  1867,  when  he  was  relieved 
and  ordered  to  the  command  of  Fort  Crook,  California. 
From  this  point  he  was  ordered  back  to  Fort  Bidwell 
and  placed  on  duty  as  acting  assistant  quartermaster  and 
acting  assistant  commissary  of  subsistence  until  Novem- 
ber,  1868,  when  detailed   on   general   recruiting  service, 
rejoining  his    regiment  at  Omaha   Barracks,  Nebraska, 
prior  to  its  consolidation,  in  1869,  and  assigned  to  Com- 
pany C,  but  soon  transferred  to  Company  F,  and  changed 
station  to  Sidney  Barracks  to  command   company  and 
post.     From  this  he  was  relieved  and  ordered,  with  his 
company,  to  <  >maha  Barracks  in  1871  ;  to  Fort  Russell, 
Wyoming  Territory,  in  1872;  to  the  Sioux  Reservation, 
Camps   Sheridan  and   Robinson,  Nebraska,  in  1875;  to 
field  duty  on  White  River,  Nebraska,  in  1876. 

Captain  Fitz  Gerald  was  wounded  at  Red  Cloud  Agency 
in  [876.  1  Ie  commanded  his  company  in  Chicago,  Illinois, 
during  the  riots  of  1877;  after  which  he  commanded  the 
quartermaster's  depot  at  Cheyenne,  Wyoming  Territory, 
until  ordered  to  Fort  McKinney,  Washington  Terri- 
tory. 

From  there  he  was  placed  on  the  retired  list  in  May, 
1879,  on  account  of  wounds  and  injuries,  at  his  own 
request. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  March  4,  1864,  and 
captain  December  31,  1873,  and  commanded  companies 
from  March  4,  1864,  to  1868,  and  from  1869  to  1879. 


WHO   SERVED   IN    THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


H7 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  DANIEL  W.  FLAGLER,  U.S.A. 

Brigadier-General  Daniel  \V.  Flagler  (Chief  of 
Ordnance)  was  born  in  New  York  March  24,  1835,  and 
graduated  at  the  Military  Academy  June  24,  1861.  He 
was  promoted  brevet  second  and  second  lieutenant  of 
ordnance  the  same  day,  and  first  lieutenant  August  3, 
1S61,  and  captain  March  3,  1863.  He  served  during  the 
rebellion  of  the  seceding  States,  1861  to  1866;  in  drill- 
ing volunteers  at  Washington,  D.  C.,  July  1-15,  1861  ; 
in  the  Manassas  campaign  and  in  the  defences  of  Washing- 
ton July  and  August,  1861  :  assistant  ordnance  officer  at 
Allegheny  Arsenal,  Pennsylvania,  and  on  foundry  duty 
at  Fort  Pitt  Foundry,  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  inspect- 
ing ordnance  for  fitting  out  the  Mississippi  River  Flotilla, 
August  to  December,  1861  ;  as  chief  of  ordnance  to  Gen- 
eral Burnside's  Expedition  to  North  Carolina,  Decem- 
ber, 1 86 1,  to  August,  1862  ;  in  charge  of  transportation 
of  siege-train  across  country,  New  Berne  to  Fort  Macon, 
North  Carolina,  and  of  construction  of  approaches  and 
batteries  in  front  of  Fort  Macon,  March  and  April,  1862  ; 
in  the  Maryland  campaign  (Army  of  the  Potomac)  as 
assistant  ordnance  officer  and  aide-de-camp  September 
and  October,  1862  ;  as  chief  ordnance  officer,  November, 
1862,  to  November,  1863  ;  in  hospital  October  and  No- 
vember, 1863;  on  inspection  duty  at  the  West  Point 
Foundry,  New  York,  November,  1863,  to  May,  1864; 
assistant  to  chief  of  ordnance,  LT.  S.  A.,  Washington, 
D.  C,  May,  1864,  to  June,  1865,  and  inspecting  arms, 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  February,  1865  ;  in  charge  of 
Tredegar  Iron  Works,  Richmond,  April  and  May,  1S65. 

General  Flagler  participated  in  the  battle  of  Bull  Run 
July  21,  1861  ;  the  battle  and  capture  of  Roanoke  Island 
February  7-8,  1862  ;  battle  of  New  Berne,  North  Carolina, 
March  14,  1862,  and  in  command  of  mortar  batteries  in 
bombardment  of  Fort  Macon,  resulting  in  capture  April 
26,  1862  ;  engaged  in  the  battle  of  South  Mountain  Sep- 
tember 14,  1862;  battle  of  Antietam  September  17,  1862; 
engaged  in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg  December  13, 
1862  ;  battle  of  Chancellorsville,  Virginia,  May  2-4,  1863,  ! 
and  battle  of  Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania,  July  1-3, 
1863. 

He  was  brevetted  captain  March  14,  1862,  for  gallant 
services  at  battle  of  New  Berne,  North  Carolina  ;  major 
April  26,  1862,  for  gallant  services  at  siege  of  Fort  Ma- 
con, North  Carolina;  lieutenant-colonel  March  13,  1865, 
for  distinguished  services  in  the  field  during  the  war  of 
the  Rebellion. 

After  the  war  closed  he  was  employed  on  a  tour  of 
inspection  of  Western  arsenals,  with  chief  of  ordnance, 
U.  S.  A.,  May,  1865  ;  in  charge  of  receiving  arms  from 
disbanded  volunteers  from  Delaware  and  Pennsylvania  at 
Wilmington,  Delaware,  and  Philadelphia  and  Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania,  May  and  June,  1865  ;  on  special  ordnance 


inspection  duty  in  Kentucky,  Tennessee,  Georgia,  and 
Alabama,  June  to  September,  1865;  assistant  ordnance 
officer,  Watervliet  Arsenal,  New  York,  ( )ctober  to  De- 
cember, 1 865  ;  in  command  of  Augusta  Arsenal  and 
Powder- Works,  Georgia,  January,  1S66,  to  May,  1871, 
having  charge  also  of  Confederate  ordnance  establish- 
ments, depots,  and  stores,  and  disposal  of  same,  at  At- 
lanta, Macon,  Athens,  and  Savannah,  Georgia,  January, 
1866,  to  January,  1869;  and  on  special  ordnance  inspec- 
tion duty  at  Fort  Fisher,  North  Carolina,  December, 
1866;  Selma,  Alabama,  February,  1869;  and  Fort 
Pickens,  Florida,  February,  1871  ;  in  command  of  Rock- 
Island  Armory  and  Arsenal  June,  1871,  to  May  31,  1886; 
member  of  Board  on  Heavy  Gun- Carriages,  at  New 
York,  January  to  March,  1873;  special  inspection  of 
Fort  Union  Arsenal,  New  Mexico,  with  view  of  break- 
ing up  same,  September,  1880;  on  Board  at  Indianap- 
olis, Indiana,  in  regard  to  removal  of  Indianapolis  Ar- 
senal, January,  1883;  on  ordnance  inspection  duty,  San 
Antonio,  Texas,  Fort  Lowell,  Arizona,  and  Benicia, 
California,  February  and  March,  1883;  in  command  of 
Frankford  Arsenal,  Pennsylvania,  May  31,  1886,  to  No- 
vember 11,  1889;  president  of  Board  on  Site  for  Gun 
Foundry  March  22  to  May  14,  1887  ;  president  of  Board 
on  Comparative  Merits  of  Morse  and  Service  Reloading 
Cartridges,  March  3  to  May  1,  1888;  on  special  duty  to 
select  site  and  make  plans  for  Columbia  Arsenal,  Ten- 
nessee, May  29  to  June  30,  1888;  president  of  Board  for 
Testing  Rifled  Cannon  and  Projectiles  in  1889  ;  in  com- 
mand of  Watertown  Arsenal,  Massachusetts,  from  No- 
vember 29,  1SS9,  to  1 89 1. 

He  was  promoted  major  June  23,  1874;  lieutenant- 
colonel  August  23,  1881  ;  colonel  September  15,  1890; 
and  was  appointed  brigadier-general  and  chief  of  ordnance 
January  23,  1891. 


OFFICERS    OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


COLONEL  DELANCEY  FLOYD-JONES,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Colonel  Delancey  Floyd-Jones  was  born,  1826,  in 
(  jueens  County,  State  of  New  York.  He  was  graduated 
at  the  l!.  S.  Military  Academy  in  the  Class  of  1S46. 
Upon  graduating  he  was  appointed  to  the  Seventh  Regi- 
ment of  Infantry,  then  serving  in  Mexico  under  General 
Taylor,  which  he  proceeded  to  join  in  September  of  that 
year. 

After  a  few  months'  service  with  General  Taylor's 
army,  he  was  promoted  to  the  Fourth  Regiment  of  In- 
fantry, which  was  transferred  to  Worth's  division  of  ( ren- 
eial  Scott's  army,  and  formed  the  advance  in  the  landing, 
and  at  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz.  Alter  the  surrender  of 
that  city,  his  company  formed  a  part  of  the  garrison  of 
San  Juan  d'UHoa. 

The  regiment  proceeded  with  the  army  en  route  for  the 
City  nl"  Mexico,  and  for  a  time  formed  a  part  of  the  gar- 
rison of  the  Castle  of  Perote,  and  the  city  of  Puebla. 
Lieutenant  Floyd-Jones  took-  part  in  the  various  en- 
■  ments  in  the  Valley  of  Mexico,  notably  in  the  battles 
of  Molino  del  Rey,  Chapultepec,  and  the  taking  of  the 
City  of  Mexico.  For  his  i  onduct  at  the  battle  of  Molino 
del  key,  he  was  especially  commended  by  Captain  — 
afterwards  General — Anderson,  of  Fort  Sumter  fame, 
on  which  he  was  brevetted  first  lieutenant. 

At  the  close  ol  the  Mexican  War  he  was  assigned  to 
duty  on  the  Northern  Lakes,  and  served  foi  a  time  as 
aide-de-camp  to  General  Brady.  In  [852  his  regiment 
transferred  to  the  Pacini  coast,  via  the  Isthmus  of 
Panama;  while  serving  in  that  department  he  took-  part 
in  the  war  against  the  Rogue  River  Indians,  a  severe 
but  successful  campaign,  lasting  some  six  months. 

On  the  breaking  on(  of  the  Rebellion  he  was,  at  the 
instance  of  General  Winfield  Scott,  made  major  of  the 
Eleventh  Infantry,  and  joined  his  regiment,  which  was 
being  recruited  at   Fort   Independence,    Boston   harbor. 


The  regiment  was  made  a  part  of  the  Army  of  the  Poto- 
mac, and  under  his  command  moved  with  that  army  in 
its  advance  upon  Yorktown,  his  regiment  being  among 
the  first  to  open  the  trenches  in  the  siege  of  that  place. 

Colonel  Floyd-Jones  continued  to  serve  with  the  Army 
,:i~  the  Potomac  and  took  part  in  the  Peninsula,  Man- 
assas, Antietam,  Fredericksburg,  Chancellorsville,  and 
Gettysburg  campaigns. 

1  [e  was  frequently  commended  by  his  brigade  com- 
manders, and  at  the  battle  of  Chancellorsville  Colonel 
Burbank  says,  "  Where  all  did  so  well  it  is  difficult  to 
discriminate,  but  I  desire  to  mention  by  name  the  regi- 
mental commander,  Major  De  Lancey  Lloyd-Jones,  Llev- 
enth  Infantry,  for  the  great  coolness  with  which  he 
commanded  his  regiment." 

In  February,  1868,  General  George  Sykcs,  in  recom- 
mending Colonel  Lloyd-Jones  for  the  brevet  of  brigadier- 
general,  says,"  This  officer  served  under  my  com- 
mand from  March,  1S62,  until  the  fall  of  1863,  and 
was  present  with  the  division  of  regular  infantry  in  the 
Peninsula,  Manassas,  Antietam,  Fredericksburg,  Chan- 
cellorsville, and  Gettysburg  campaigns  of  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac.  lie  was  often  favorably  mentioned  in  the 
reports  of  his  brigade  commander,  and  in  the  fight  on  the 
Old  Turnpike  near  Chancellorsville  on  the  1st  of  May, 
1S63,  distinguished  himself  at  the  head  of  his  regiment. 

"As  commander  of  the  Fifth  Corps  I  had  the  oppor- 
tunity to  observe  the  zeal  of  Colonel  Lloyd-Jones  in  the 
campaign  and  battle  of  Gettysburg,  and  for  these  special 
instances  and  his  services  during  the  Rebellion  respect- 
fully recommend  him  for  the  brevet  of  brigadier-general 
in  the  army. 

"Colonel  Floyd-Jones  is  one  of  the  few  officers  of  his 
grade  who  have  not  yet  received  this  recognition  of  his 
services,  and  when  so  many  have  received  it,  whose 
duties  in  the  field  are  not  to  be  mentioned  with  those   of 


<  olonel  Floyd 

held  from  him 

(Signed) 


■Jones,  I  think-  it  should  no  longer  be  with- 


"  George  Sykes, 
"  Lieutenant- Colonel  Fifth  Infantry, 
"  Brevet  Major-General  U.S.A." 
The  colonel  has  been  three  times  brevetted  for  gallant 
conduct  in  battle,  viz. :  First  lieutenant  for  Molino  del 
Rey,  Mexico;  lieutenant-colonel  for  the  Peninsula  cam- 
paign, Virginia,  and  colonel  for  the  battle  of  Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania.  Much  of  Colonel  Floyd- Jones's  service 
has  been  on  the  Western  frontier.  He  retired  from 
active  duty  in  1879,  after  thirty-three  years'  service,  nine- 
teen of  which  was  in  the  Indian  country.  He  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  well-known  family  of  Lloyd-Jones,  of  Long 
Island,  and  has  his  home  at  South  Oyster  Bay,  Long  Isl- 
and. I  fe  has  travelled  extensively,  and  an  outline  of  his 
journey  around  the  woild,  made  in  1885-86,  has  been 
published,  under  the  title  of  "  Letters  from  the  Far  East." 


WHO  SERVED  I IV  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


149 


LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER  CHARLES  W.  FLUSSER, 

U.S.N,  (deceased). 

Lieutenant-Commander  Charles  W.  Flusser  was  a 
native  of  Maryland,  but  was  appointed  midshipman  from 
Kentucky  in  July,  1847.  Of  this  date,  not  a  large  one, 
three  members  were  killed  in  battle  during  the  Civil 
War, — Cummings,  Gwin,  and  Flusser. 

The  latter  was  commissioned  lieutenant  in  September, 
1855,  and  lieutenant-commander  in  July,  1862. 

During  his  early  years  of  service  on  the  Home  Sta- 
tion, the  Brazils,  the  East  Indies,  and  elsewhere,  his 
career  was  that  usual  to  the  junior  naval  officer.  He 
was  always  noted  for  attention  to  duty,  and  a  quiet,  con- 
tained manner,  approaching  reticence  in  personal  inter- 
course. But  those  who  knew  him  well  also  knew  that 
his  quiet  demeanor  concealed  a  warm  heart  and  a  gallant 
spirit. 

When  the  expedition  to  Roanoke  Island  was  in  course 
of  preparation,  Flusser  was  ordered  there  in  command 
of  the  "  Commodore  Pern-,"  a  side-wheel  steamer  with 
four  heavy  guns.  Roanoke  Island  was  the  grand 
strategic  point  for  the  North  Carolina  Sounds,  and  the 
preparations  on  both  sides  showed  the  importance 
attached  to  that  position.  The  success  was  complete  on 
both  land  and  shore  ;  and  in  the  chase  of  the  rebel  flotilla 
their  flag-ship  "  Sea-Bird"  was  run  into  and  sunk  by 
Flusser  in  the  "  Commodore  Perry,"  who  took  as  pris- 
oners nearly  all  her  officers  and  crew.  In  July,  in  com- 
mand of  three  light-draught  vessels  with  a  company  of 
soldiers  on  board,  he  made  a  reconnoissance  of  the  Ro- 
anoke River,  and  fell  under  a  sustained  and.  galling  fire 
of  concealed  riflemen  on  the  banks.  Flusser  had  been 
ordered  to  go  to  a  certain  point, — and  he  did  it,  in  spite 
of  the  opposition  of  fire,  which  he  could  not  return  with- 
out delay.  He  reached  his  point  and  carried  off  the 
steamer  "  Nelson,"  belonging  to  the  Confederacy.  He 
returned  with  one  killed  and  ten  wounded,  having 
accomplished  his  mission. 

His  fight  at  Franklin,  on  the  Blackwater  River,  on 
the  3d  of  October,  deserves  to  be  read  in  full.  After 
getting  up  the  river,  Flusser  did  not  wait  for  the  co-oper- 
ating troops,  but  pushed  on,  to  find  a  terrific  fire  from 
concealed  riflemen  on  the  banks,  which  made  the  work- 
ing of  the  guns  most  difficult.  Flusser  was  a  particu- 
larly cool  and  daring  man,  and  finding  himself  in  a  trap 
determined  to  fight  it  out  until  the  troops  came  up. 
He  threw  Xl.-inch  shell  into  Franklin,  and  with  his  32- 
pounder   he  poured  grape  and  canister  into  the  woods. 


With  another  32-pounder  he  fought  mi  the  other  side, 
— and  with  his  IX. -inch  gun  he  shelled  the  strongest 
position  of  the  enemy.  Till  this  time  his  guns'  crews 
were  exposed  to  a  hot  rifle-fire  which  came  from  con- 
cealed positions.  The  enemy  had  cut  trees  down  across 
the  narrow  river  behind  him,  but,  "  neck  or  nothing,"  he 
got  round,  put  on  steam,  and  pierced  his  way  through 
and  over  the  obstruction.  In  all  these  enterprises  in  the 
Sounds  he  was  a  leading  spirit.  In  many  of  them  little 
was  to  be  gained  but  hard  knocks, — yet  he  was  always 
ready.  "He  was  a  terror  to  the  marauding  troops  of 
the  enemy,  who  made  a  note  of  all  his  movements." 

On  the  1 8th  of  April,  1864,  after  a  heavy  fight  about 
Plymouth,  North  Carolina,  in  which  both  army  and 
navy  were  concerned,  the  "  Miami"  and  "  Southfield," 
being  under  Flusser's  command,  were  anchored  below 
the  town  to  prevent  a  flank  movement  of  the  Confederates. 
Just  then  the  news  was  received  that  the  ram  "  Albe- 
marle" was  on  her  way  down,  and  the  two  vessels  were 
chained  together  to  meet  her.  In  less  than  five  minutes 
the  collision  occurred.  The  ram  struck  the  "  Miami" 
on  the  port  bow,  and  the  "  Southfield"  on  the  starboard 
bow,  causing  the  latter  to  sink  rapidly.  Both  vessels 
were  firing  into  the  ram  with  their  100-pounder  rifles, 
and  XL-inch  Dahlgren  guns,  but  apparently  made  no 
impression,  although  alongside.  Flusser  fired  the  first 
three  shots  himself,  the  third  shot  being  a  ten-second 
Dahlgren  XL-inch  shell.  Directly  after  this  shot  Flusser 
was  killed  by  a  fragment  of  a  shell, — -whether  from  the 
ram,  or  from  the  one  from  the  "  Miami"  rebounding,  is 
doubtful. 


ISO 


OFFICERS  OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


COMMANDHR  WILLIAM  M.   FOLGER,   U.S.N. 

Commander  William   M.  Folger  is  a  native  of  Ohio, 

and  was  appointed  a  midshipman  from  that  State  in 
September,  1861.  He  remained  at  the  Naval  Academy 
until  November  22,  1864.  He  was  then  attached  to  the 
receiving-ship  "  North  Carolina,"  at  New  York,  and  the 
school-ship  "  Sabine,"  New  London,  from  February  to 
JuK-,  1865.  He  then  made  a  three-years'  cruise  in  the 
steam-sloop  "  Hartford,"  flag-ship  of  the  Asiatic  Squad- 
ron. Promoted  to  lieutenant  March  ir,  1868,  and  com- 
missioned lieutenant-commander  in  December  of  the  same 


year.  After  being  stationed  at  the  Norfolk  Navy- Yard, 
he  was  ordered  to  the  flag-ship  "  Franklin,"  of  the  Euro- 
pean Squadron,  and  served  in  that  vessel,  and  in  others  of 
that  squadron,  from  1868  to  1872.  Upon  his  return  to  the 
Linked  States  he  was  upon  ordnance  duty  for  two  years. 
In  1875-76  he  was  on  leave  of  absence  in  luirope,  and 
during  1877  was  attached  to  the  steam-sloop  "  Marion," 
on  the  European  Station.  From  1887  to  1S89  he  was 
on  duty  at  the  Naval  Academy  at  Annapolis;  and  then 
made  a  cruise  in  the  "  Swatara,"  of  the  Asiatic  Squad- 
ron. In  1882  he  was  attached  to  the  Bureau  of  Ord- 
nance, Navy  Department;  and  was  then  for  three  years 
upon  ordnance  duty  at  Annapolis,  when  the  naval  prov- 
ing and  experimental  ordnance  work  was  carried  on. 

He  was  promoted  to  be  commander  in  March,  18S5, 
and  commanded  the  "  Quinnebaug,"  on  the  European 
Station,  during  1886-88.  After  his  return  he  was  in- 
spector of  ordnance  at  the  navy-yard  at  Washington 
from  1888  to  1890.  In  the  last  named  year  he  was 
appointed  and  confirmed  by  the  Senate  as  Chief  of  the 
Bureau  of  Ordnance,  with  rank  of  commodore,  which 
office  he  fills  at  present.  Commodore  Folger  has  been 
for  several  years  identified  with  the  extensive  and  im- 
portant work  connected  with  the  new  ordnance  provided 
for  the  navy,  and  the  establishment  of  the  plant  neces- 
sary for  making  the  same;  as  well  as  with  the  ex- 
haustive trials  of  armor-plate  of  various  descriptions. 
In  this  way  his  name  has  become  familiar  to  scientific 
engineers,  as  well  as  to  military  and  naval  men  of  all 
countries. 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


i5i 


SURGEON-GENERAL  JONATHAN  M.  EOLTZ,  U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Surgeon-General  Jonathan  M.  Foltz  was  born  in 
Pennsylvania,  and  entered  the  service  from  Maryland,  as 
assistant  surgeon,  in  April,  183 1.  He  first  served  in 
the  frigate  "  Potomac,"  on  the  Pacific  Station,  and  upon 
his  return  home  was  attached  to  the  Medical  Bureau, 
and  to  the  navy-yard  at  Washington.  He  received  his 
commission  as  surgeon  in  December,  1838,  and  was  in 
charge  of  the  United  States  Naval  Hospital  at  Port 
Mahon  during  the  years  1839-40.  He  afterwards  made 
a  three  years'  cruise  on  the  Brazil  Station,  in  the  frigate 
"  Raritan."  He  was  attached  to  the  Washington  Navy- 
Yard  in  1850;  and  from  185 1  to  1854  served  in  the 
"Jamestown,"  on  the  coast  of  Brazil.  His  next  service 
was  at  the  Rendezvous  at  Philadelphia,  and  at  the  Naval 
Asylum  in  the  same  city. 

After  a  short  service  in  the  steam-frigate  "  Niagara," 
he  was,  on  the  formation  of  Farragut's  fleet  for  the 
capture  of  New  Orleans,  ordered  as  fleet-surgeon.  Dur- 
ing all  Farragut's  actions  in  1862-63,  he  occupied  the 
post  of  fleet-surgeon,  a  most  responsible  and  onerous  one. 

In  1864-66  he  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Exami- 
ners, and  president  of  the  board  in  1867.  When  Farra- 
gut  went  upon  his  European  cruise  in  1868-69,  Foltz 
was  again  his  fleet-surgeon.  He  was  commissioned 
medical  director  in  March,  1871,  and  was  chief  of  the 
Bureau  of  Medicine  and  Surgery,  1871-73. 

He  died  in  Philadelphia  in  April,  1887.  Dr.  Foltz 
was  a  man  who  impressed  all  with  whom  he  came  in 
contact  as  a  thorough-going  and  reliable  person.  He  had 
no  hobbies  in  his  professional  views,  which  were  sound 


and  sensible,  without  pretension.  When  President  Bu- 
chanan was  in  the  White  House,  and  became  indisposed 
or  ill,  his  first  act  was  to  send  for  Foltz,  who  was  stationed 
in  Philadelphia  at  the  time  Mr.  Buchanan  was  in  the 
presidential  chair :  so  Farragut  came  to  rely  upon  him, 
and  with  reason.  When  the  admiral  became  ill  while 
on  his  travel  in  Europe,  during  his  last  cruise,  he 
hastened  back  to  the  "  Franklin,"  at  Spezzia,  for  the  care 
which  he  required.  The  estimation  in  which  Dr.  Foltz 
was  held  by  his  townsmen  of  Lancaster,  Pennsylvania, 
was  evidenced  by  an  immense  attendance  upon  his  funeral 
in  that  ancient  city,  where  his  remains  lie  close  to  those 
of  Reynolds,  a  townsman,  and  the  hero  and  martyr  of 
the  first  day  of  Gettysburg. 


1^2 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


REAR-ADMIRAL   ANDREW   HULL   FOOTE,   U.S.N. 
(deceasi  d). 

Rear-Admiral  Andrew  Hull  Foote  was  born  in 
Connecticut  12th  September,  1806.  He  was  a  son  of 
S.  A.  Foote,  United  States  Senator.  Foote  entered  the 
navy  as  a  midshipman  in  1822,  and  served  under  the 
elder  Porter  in  breaking  up  the  piratical  haunts  in  the 
West  Indies.  He  became  lieutenant  in  1830.  In  [849- 
50-5  1,  while  in  command  of  the"  Perry,"  he  did  effective 
service  in  the  suppression  of  the  African  .slave-trade.  In 
1856  he  was  in  China,  in  command  of  the  "Plymouth," 
during  hostilities  between  the  Chinese  and  the  English. 
While  protecting  American  property  he  was  fired  upon 
by  the  forts  on  Canton  River.  Lie  obtained  permission 
from  Commodore  Armstrong  to  demand  an  apology,  and, 
when  this  was  refused,  he  attacked  the  forts,  four  in 
number,  with  the  sloops  "Portsmouth"  and  "Levant," 
breached  the  largest,  and  carried  them  by  storm.  His 
lo  was  forty,  that  of  the  enemy  four  hundred.  When 
the  Civil  War  began  he  was  selected  to  command  the 
flotilla   forming  upon  the  Western  waters.     It  was  most 


exacting  duty,  and  he  himself  said  the  hardest  he  ever 
performed.  In  February,  1862,  having  a  number  of 
vessels  in  readiness,  he  moved  against  Fort  Henry,  in 
.  connection  with  General  Grant's  forces,  had  a  hotly- 
contested  engagement,  and  carried  the  fort  before  the 
army  got  up.  His  conduct  on  this,  as  on  other  occa- 
sions, was  conspicuously  fine.  A  few  days  after  Fort 
Donelson  was  attacked  by  the  united  forces,  ami,  dur- 
ing a  prolonged  engagement,  had  several  of  his  vessels 
disabled  and  was  himself  wounded.  In  conjunction  with 
General  Lope  he  next  operated  against  Island  No.  10, 
the  strong  works  there  surrendering  to  him  on  April  7. 
His  wound,  which  his  impetuous  spirit  had  caused  him 
to  neglect,  now  became  so  troublesome  that  he  was 
forced  to  give  up  his  command.  In  June  he  received 
the  thanks  of  Congress,  and  was  made  a  rear-admiral. 
I  le  was  also  appointed  chief  of  the  Bureau  of  Equipment 
and  Recruiting.  In  June,  1863,  he  was  selected  to  suc- 
ceed Rear-Admiral  Dupont  in  command  of  the  fleet  off 
Charleston;  but,  while  on  his  way  to  assume  this  com- 
mand, he  died  at  New  York  June  26,  1863.  He  was 
a  man  of  a  high  type  of  Christian  character,  with  most 
genial  and  lovable  traits,  but  uncompromisingly  firm  in 
his  principles,  especially  in  regard  to  temperance  reform 
in  the  navy,  where  he  was  the  means  of  abolishing  the 
spirit-ration.  Admiral  Smith  said  of  him:  "Rear- 
Admiral  Foote's  character  is  well  known  in  the  navy. 
One  ot  the  strongest  traits  was  great  persistence  in  any- 
thing he  undertook  .  .  .  He  was  truly  a  pious  man, 
severely  an  honest  man,  and  a  philanthropist  of  the  first 
order.  He  was  one  of  our  foremost  navy  officers — none 
before  him."  By  his  being  the  first  to  break  the  Con- 
federate line  of  defence,  in  an  hour  of  great  depression. 
he  raised  the  hope  and  prestige  of  success.  Courageous 
and  successful,  he  was  thoroughly  devoted  to  his  pro- 
fession, and  united  the  characteristics  of  both  the  new  and 
old  schools  of  the  navy. 

He  wrote  "Africa  and  the  American  Flag,"  which 
was  published  in  1 S 3 4 ,  and  excited  much  attention  at 
the  time. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


153 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  JAMES  FORNEY,  U.S.M.C. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  James  Forney  (United  States 
Marine  Corps)  was  born  in  Lancaster,  Pennsylvania,  on 
January  17,  1 844,  the  son  of  J.  W.  Forney. 

Colonel  Forney  was  commissioned  a  second  lieuten- 
ant March  1,  1861,  and  served  on  board  the  flag-ship 
"Roanoke;"  became  a  first  lieutenant  in  September; 
was  in  command  of  the  Marine  Barracks  at  Washing- 
ton ;  was  in  command  of  the  Marine  Barracks  at  Ports- 
mouth, New  Hampshire;  ordered  to  the  steam-sloop 
"  Brooklyn,"  West  Gulf  Squadron,  and  in  her  partici- 
pated in  the  capture  of  Forts  Jackson  and  St.  Philip, 
and  the  city  of  New  Orleans.  In  the  official  report  is 
stated,  "  Lieutenant  James  Forney,  commanding  marines, 
had  two  guns  assigned  him,  and,  with  his  men,  fought 
most  gallantly."  Admiral  Farragut  detailed  him  to  go 
on  shore  and  raise  the  flag  on  the  Custom-House  of 
New  Orleans.  It  was  the  first  hoisted  there,  and  he 
brought  off  the  Confederate  flag,  and  delivered  it  to 
Captain  Craven,  of  the  "  Brooklyn."  For  these  services 
he  was  brevetted  a  captain.  While  attached  to  the  West 
Gulf  Squadron  he  participated  in  the  actions  at  Clial- 
mette,  Port  Hudson,  Grand  Gulf,  first  and  second  attacks 
on  Vicksburg,  Donaldsonville,  Bayou  Sara,  and  Galves- 
ti  in,  Texas.  At  Brazos  Santiago  he  cut  out  and  captured 
four  vessels,  with  valuable  cargoes,  from  under  the  rebel 
batteries.  He  was  commissioned  captain  in  April, 
1864. 

In  July  of  that  year,  when  a  Confederate  army  under 
Early  threatened  the  capital,  Forney  had  command  of 
the  troops  at  Havre  de  Grace,  Maryland.  General  French, 
in  his  report  of  the  ensuing  operations,  writes  thus  :  "The 
army  of  the  Confederates,  under  Jubal  Early,  was  at  the 
gates  of  Washington  ;  communication  with  the  northern 
cities  was  cut  off;  Gilmore's  cavalry  had  captured  a 
passenger  train  (made  prisoner  of  General  Franklin) 
and  then  destroyed  it,  and  burned  the  bridge  over  Gun- 
powder River.  The  War  Department  shared  in  these 
fears  of  disaster,  and,  by  telegraph,  all  the  available 
troops  at  the  West  were  ordered  to  assemble  at  Havre 
de  Grace,  Maryland.  At  the  same  time  a  despatch 
requested  me  to  assume  command  of  them.  In  less 
than  eight  hours'  time  three  thousand  men  had  reported, 
of  all  arms  of  the  service.  Captain  Forney  was  first  on 
the  ground,  with  a  splendid  battalion  of  troops  of  the 
Marine  Corps,  and  eight  field  howitzers.  These  troops 
were  at  once  advanced  ;  a  part  covered  the  reconstruction 
of  the  bridges,  and  others  were  made  to  demonstrate 
upon  the  rebel  rear  and  flanks,  preparatory  to  an  advance. 
The  same  day  the  travel  through  to  Baltimore  was  opened. 
Early,  threatened  in  every  direction,  fell  back." 

For  this  duty  Captain   Forney  received  the  brevet  of 
lieutenant-colonel,  "  for  meritorious  services  in  defeating 
a  rebel  raid  at  Gunpowder  Bridge." 
20 


After  the  war  Forney  served  in  the  flag-ship  "  Hart- 
ford," in  the  Asiatic  Squadron,  as  fleet  marine  officer, 
from  1865  to  1868.  During  an  unusually  severe  and 
exhausting  expedition  in  the  Island  of  Formosa,  in  June, 
1867,  he  commanded  the  marines.  The  climate,  the 
nature  of  the  ground,  and  the  bush-fighting  of  the  natives 
rendered  this  service  a  particularly  trying  one.  He  was 
recognized  by  a  brevet  of  major  "for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  in  the  action  with  the  savages  at  Formosa, 
June  13,  1867." 

In  October,  1870,  Colonel  Forney  commanded  the 
marines  in  the  riots  which  took  place  in  Philadelphia  in 
consequence  of  the  enforcement  of  the  Fifteenth  Amend- 
ment, being  the  first  vote  of  the  colored  population. 

Aided  the  revenue  officers  in  the  task  of  breaking 
up  illicit  distillation  in  Philadelphia  ;  and  in  September 
of  1873  joined  the  "  Minnesota"  steam-frigate. 

In  1875  and  1876  he  was  fleet  marine  officer  of  the 
North  Pacific  Squadron;  in  August,  1876,  assumed  the 
command  of  the  marines  at  League  Island,  and  in 
1877-78  commanded  the  marines  at  Norfolk,  Virginia. 
In  the  summer  of  1877,  during  the  labor  riots,  he  com- 
manded the  second  battalion  of  marines,  who  were  com- 
plimented in  general  orders  by  the  Secretary  of  the 
Navy  and  by  General  Hancock.  Colonel  Barry,  of  the 
Second  Artillery,  brevet  major-general  commanding, 
says  : 

"  On  relieving  the  marines  from  further  duty  under  my 
command,  I  shall  express  the  opinion  of  Major-General 
Hancock,  and  shall  find  great  pleasure  in  giving  expres- 
sion also  to  my  own  conviction,  'that  the  services  and 
military  appearance  and  conduct  of  the  battalion  of 
Luiited  States  marines,  commanded  by  Captain  Forney, 
have  been  such,  while  serving  in  this  command,  as  to 
entitle  them  to  commendation  and  thanks.'  " 

In  command  at  League  Island,  Pennsylvania. 


154 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


COMMANDHR  J.   M.   FORSYTH,  U.S.N. 

Commander  James  McQueen  Forsyth  was  born 
on  Long  Island,  Bahamas,  January  I,  1S42.  He  came 
to  Philadelphia  when  eleven  years  old,  and  was  edu- 
cated in  the  public  schools  of  that  city.  At  the  age 
of  fifteen  he  went  to  sea  in  the  merchant  service,  and 
then,  before  he  was  twenty  years  of  age,  on  August  I, 
1 861,  entered  the  naval  service  as  a  volunteer,  under 
Commander  H.  S.  Stellwagen,  who  appointed  him 
second-class  pilot  for  the  Hatteras  Expedition,  and  who 
favorably  mentioned  him  in  his  report  of  the  capture 
of  Forts  Clark  and  Hatteras.  In  September,  1861,  he 
was  made  acting  master's  mate,  and  served  thenceforth 
in  various  grades  through  the  war,  in  the  North  and 
South  Atlantic  and  the  West  Gulf  Squadrons.  He  was 
present  in  the  engagements  under  Farragut  from  Forts 
Jackson  and  St.  Philip  to  Vicksburg,  the  fight  at  Grand 
Gulf,  and  the  engagements  with  the  rebel  ram  "Arkan- 
sas." For  good  service  in  these  actions  he  was  made 
acting  ensign  in  September,  1862;  was  then  attached 
to  the  "  Water-Witch,"  "  Pawnee,"  and  monitor  "  Nan- 
tucket," of  the  South  Atlantic  Squadron  ;  took  part  in 
expeditions  up  St.  John's  River,  and  various  engagements 
with  Sumter,  Moultrie,  and  other  works  at  Charleston. 
Promoted  to  acting  master  August  1,  1864.  He  was  one 
of  the  officers  detailed  to  take  north  the  captured  rebel 
ram  "Columbia,"  in    May.    1865.     From    1865   to   1868 


served  as  navigator  and  executive-officer  of  the  "  Nyack," 
of  the  Pacific  Squadron. 

Commissioned  as  master  in  the  regular  navy  March, 
1868,  and  as  lieutenant  December  18,  1868.  During 
1868  and  1869  he  was  executive-officer  of  the  "  Pur- 
veyor," on  special  service.  After  duty  on  board  the 
receiving-ship  "  Potomac,"  he  became  navigator  and 
executive-officer  of  the  iron-clad  "  Saugus,"  of  the  North 
Atlantic  Squadron,  and  then  executive-officer  of  the  iron- 
clad "  Ajax."  He  was  next  stationed  at  the  navy-yard 
at  Philadelphia  from  May,  1871,  to  December,  1872,  and 
then  joined  the  "  Supply"  as  executive-officer.  This 
vessel  was  employed  on  special  service  in  connection  with 
the  Vienna  Exposition  from  January  to  December,  1873. 
For  some  months  after  this,  Lieutenant  Forsyth  was 
stationed  at  the  Philadelphia  Navy- Yard.  From  March, 
1874,  to  February,  1877,  he  was  navigating  officer  of  the 
"  Powhatan,"  North  Atlantic  Station.  Ill  health  caused 
him  to  take  three  months'  sick-leave,  but  he  was  ordered 
to  the  course  in  torpedo  instruction  that  summer,  and  for 
the  rest  of  1877  and  the  whole  of  1878  he  was  on  duty 
at  League  Island.  He  was  promoted  lieutenant-com- 
mander May  9,  1878;  served  as  executive-officer  of  the 
"Constellation"  in  her  special  service  of  Irish  relief, 
March  to  June,  1880,  and  then  was  for  some  months 
upon  "  waiting  orders."  In  1 88 1 ,  after  three  months'  ser- 
vice in  the  receiving-ship  "  Colorado,"  he  was  ordered 
to  the  "  Lancaster,"  of  the  Mediterranean  Squadron,  as 
navigating  and  executive-officer,  where  he  remained  until 
September,  1884.  The  "  Lancaster"  was  flag-ship  during 
this  period. 

Lieutenant-Commander  Forsyth  was  on  leave  from 
November,  1884, to  April,  1885,  when  he  was  ordered  to 
League  Island  as  ordnance  officer,  and  remained  there 
until  June,  1886.  At  that  date  he  was  ordered  to  the 
U.  S.  Naval  Home  as  assistant  to  the  executive-officer, 
and  remained  on  that  duty  until  Jul)-,  1889.  He  was 
promoted  to  be  commander  February  14,  18S9. 

Commander  Forsyth  was  ordered  to  the  command  of 
the  school-ship  "  Saratoga,"  but  the  orders  were  revoked 
at  his  own  request,  and  he  was  then  detailed  for  the 
command  of  the  "  Tallapoosa,"  of  the  Brazil  Squadron. 
This  vessel  was  condemned  and  sold  on  the  station  in 
the  early  spring  of  1S92,  and  Commander  Forsyth  re- 
turned to  the  United  States  bv  mail-steamer. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


1 55 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  ROYAL  T.  FRANK,  U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Royal  T.  Frank  (Second  Ar- 
tillery) was  born  in  Gray,  Cumberland  County,  Maine, 
May  6,  1836,  his  ancestors  being  among  the  pioneer 
settlers  of  that  State.  He  was  appointed  to  the  Military 
Academy  at  West  Point  in  1854,  and,  graduating  four 
years  later,  was  assigned  to  the  Eighth  Infantry,  which 
he  joined  in  New  Mexico  in  1859.  In  the  following 
summer  he  participated  in  a  campaign  against  the  Kiowa 
and  Comanche  Indians  of  that  Territory,  and  on  the 
23d  of  July,  while  in  command  of  Companies  E  and  K 
of  his  regiment,  was  engaged  in  a  severe  skirmish  with 
a  largely  superior  number  of  those  Indians  near  Hatch's 
Ranch,  New  Mexico.  His  prompt  and  soldier-like  con- 
duct in  that  affair  was  highly  commended  by  the  depart- 
ment commander,  and  was  mentioned  in  orders  from  the 
head-quarters  of  the  army  announcing  the  operations  of 
that  year. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  May  14,  1861,  and 
in  May,  1861,  while  en  route  with  a  battalion  of  his  regi- 
ment under  the  command  of  Brevet  Lieutenant-Colonel 
J.  V.  D.  Reeves,  from  El  Paso,  Texas,  to  the  coast,  he 
was  surrendered  a  prisoner  of  war  near  San  Antonio, 
and  was  held  a  prisoner  in  Texas  until  exchanged  in 
February,  1862,  when  he  rejoined  his  regiment  in  the 
defences  of  Washington,  having  been  promoted  captain 
February  27,  1862. 

He  was  in  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
and  during  the  Peninsula  campaign  was  on  provost  duty 
at  the  head-quarters  of  that  army.  I  le  commanded  his 
regiment  during  the  Maryland  and  Rappahannock  cam- 
paign, and  was  on  duty  with  it  during  the  Gettysburg 
campaign.  From  1864  to  1866  was  acting  assistant 
adjutant-general  of  the  general  recruiting  service.  He 
was  made  brevet  major  for  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices during  the  Peninsula  campaign,  and  brevet  lieu- 
tenant-colonel for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the 
battle  of  Fredericksburg,  Virginia. 

After  the  war  he  was  on  duty  in  the  South,  and  during 
the  reconstruction  period  commanded  the  posts  or  dis- 
tricts of  Wilmington,  North  Carolina,  and  Darlington, 
South   Carolina,  and  subsequently  was  in  command  at 


several  other  posts  until  December,  1870,  when  he  was 
transferred  to  the  First  Artillery.  With  that  regiment 
he  served  at  various  points,  North  and  South,  and  was 
engaged  with  it  at  different  times  in  suppressing  civil 
disturbances  incident  to  the  internal  revenue  laws,  the 
political  troubles  in  the  South  in  1876,  and  the  labor 
troubles  in  Pennsylvania  in  1877.  In  the  performance 
of  these  duties  he  was  in  command  at  several  important 
points,  and  was  mentioned  in  the  reports  of  General 
Hancock  and  others  for  especially  valuable  services.  In 
1 88 1  his  regiment  was  transferred  to  the  Pacific  coast, 
where  he  served  until  1886,  commanding  the  posts  of 
Alcatraz  Island  and  Fort  Point,  San  Francisco  harbor. 
In  June  he  was  ordered  to  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  and 
assigned  to  duty  at  the  Artillery  School  as  superintendent 
of  the  departments  of  engineering,  law,  and  military  art ; 
subsequently  as  senior  instructor  in  the  latter  depart- 
ment. In  November,  1888,  he  was  assigned  to  the  com- 
mand of  the  Artillery  School  and  of  the  post  of  Fort 
Monroe. 

Colonel  Frank  was  transferred  from  the  Infantry  to  the 
First  Artillery  as  a  captain  December  15,  1870.  He  was 
promoted  major  January  2,  1881,  and  lieutenant-colonel 
of  the  Second  Artillery  January  25,  1889. 


1 56 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


RKAR-ADMIRAL  SAMUEL   R.  FRANKLIN,  U.S.N. 

(Kl  TIKI  D). 

Rear-Admiral  Samuel  R.  Franklin  was  bom  in  Penn- 
sylvania, and  appointed  midshipman  from  that  State, 
February  18,  1841.  First  served  on  the  frigate  "United 
States,"  in  the  Pacific,  and  then  in  the  "  Relief,"  store- 
ship.  Present  at  the  demonstration  upon  Monterey, 
when  no  resistance  was  offered,  and  the  place  was  occu- 
pied without  a  battle.  Midshipman  Franklin  was  de- 
tained abroad  by  the  event,  and  was  not  ordered  to  the 
Naval  School  until  1847.  Passed  midshipman  August 
10,  1847.  Served  in  razee  "  Independence,"  Mediter- 
ranean, for  three  years,  and  on  the  Coast  Survey  for  two 
years.  Commissioned  lieutenant  September  14,  1855; 
Naval  Academy,  1855-56;  sloop  "Falmouth,"  Pra7.il 
Squadron,  1857-59;  sloop"  Macedonian,"  Home  Squad- 
ron, 1859-60;  sloop  "  Dakota,"  Atlantic  cast,  1861-62. 
When  the"  Merrimac"  came  out,  on  the  8th  March,  1862, 
Lieutenant  Franklin  was  a  volunteer  on  board  the 
"Roanoke"  at  the  time  the  "Congress''  and  "Cumber- 
land" were  destroyed.  The  "  Roanoke"  was  engaged 
with  the  batteries  at  Sewell's  Point,  but  grounded  soon 
.ifter,  and  was  not  fairly  in  action  with  the  rebel  iron- 
clad. July  [6,  [862,  was  commissioned  as  lieutenant- 
commander,   and    ordered    to   command   "Aroostook," 


gun-boat,  James  River  Flotilla.  In  1863  proceeded  in 
same  vessel  to  the  West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron  ; 
was  upon  special  duty  in  New  Orleans  in  1864;  chief 
of  staff  of  West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron,  under  Bell, 
Palmer,  and  Thatcher  ;  was  the  naval  representative  in 
the  demand  for  the  surrender  of  the  city  of  Mobile,  in 
the  spring  of  [865.  After  the  war  commanded  "Sagi- 
naw," North  Pacific  Squadron,  1866-67;  on  special  duty 
in  regard  to  laying  a  cable  across  Bering's  Straits. 

Commissioned  commander  September,  1866;  ordnance 
duty,  navy-yard,  California,  1868-69.  In  1869-70  com- 
manded "  Mohican,"  North  Pacific  Squadron,  and  took 
the  scientific  party  to  Plover  Bay,  Siberia,  to  observe  the 
total  eclipse  of  the  sun. 

Equipment  duty,  Mare  Island  Navy-Yard,  1870-72; 
commissioned  captain  August  13,  1872;  commanded 
"Wabash,"  European  Station,  1873;  also  served  as  chief 
of  staff  to  Admiral  Case.  When  the  flag  was  shifted 
to  the  "  Franklin,"  Captain  Franklin  commanded  her, 
and  was  chief  of  staff  to  Rear-Admiral  Worden  ;  presi- 
dent of  Board  for  Promotion  of  Officers,  navy-yard,  Nor- 
folk, 1877;  promoted  to  commodore  May  1881  ;  special 
duty,  Washington,  1881—83;  previous  to  which  served 
as  hydrographer  to  the  Bureau  of  Navigation  ;  superin- 
tendent of  Naval  Observatory,  1884-85.  In  that  posi- 
tion represented  United  States  of  Colombia  in  the  In- 
ternational Conference  to  establish  a  prime  meridian  ; 
promoted  rear-admiral  January,  1885;  ordered  to  com- 
mand of  European  Station  February,  1885,  with  "  Pensa- 
cola"  as  flag-ship.  Remained  on  that  station  until  re- 
lieved, and  retired,  under  operation  of  the  law,  in  Au- 
gust, 1887. 

.Although  Admiral  Franklin  was  on  the  retired  list, 
he  was,  in  February,  1889,  appointed  by  President  Cleve- 
land as  one  of  the  delegates  on  the  part  of  the  United 
States  to  the  International  Marine  Conference,  and  was 
chosen  president  of  that  body  upon  its  assembly  at 
Washington,  on  October  16,  1889.  Admiral  Franklin 
had  two  brothers  in  the  army.  One  was  the  very  dis- 
tinguished General  William  B.  Franklin,  the  commander 
of  an  army  corps  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac.  The 
other,  younger,  was  in  the  Twelfth  Infantry,  and  resigned, 
soon  after  the  late  war,  to  engage  in  the  superintendence 
of  extensive  iron-works. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


'57 


COLONEL  AND   BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  WILLIAM 
B.  FRANKLIN,  U.S.A. 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General  William  B. 
Franklin  was  born  in  Pennsylvania,  and  graduated  at 
the  Military  Academy  July  i,  1843.  He  was  promoted 
brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Topographical  Engi- 
neers in  1845  ;  he  was  detailed  as  topographical  officer  on 
General  Kearney's  expedition  to  the  South  Pass  of  the 
Rocky  Mountains,  in  the  same  year. 

Promoted  second  lieutenant  in  the  same  corps  Septem- 
ber 21,  1846,  he  served  in  the  war  with  Mexico,  partici- 
pating in  General  Wool's  march  through  Coahuila  during 
1846-47,  being  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Buena  Vista 
February  22-23,  l%47>  anc'  brevetted  first  lieutenant  for 
this  engagement  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct." 

On  Jul)-  21,  1848,  Lieutenant  Franklin  was  ordered  to 
the  Military  Academy  as  assistant  professor  of  natural 
and  experimental  philosophy,  which  he  retained  until 
January  9,  1852. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  March  3,  1853,  and 
captain  in  his  corps  July  1,  1857,  was  secretary  of  the 
Light-House  Board  from  March  3,  1857,  until  November 
1,  1S59,  when  he  was  detailed  as  superintending  engineer 
in  charge  of  the  extension  of  the  capitol  (including  the 
new  dome),  and  of  the  General  Post-Office  at  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  until  March  3,  1861,  when  he  was  made  chief 
of  the  Construction  Bureau  of  the  U.  S.  Treasury  De- 
partment and  superintending  engineer  of  the  Treasury 
Building  Extension  until  May  14,  [861,  at  which  date  he 
was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Twelfth  U.  S.  Infantry. 

Colonel  Franklin  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of 
volunteers  May  17,  [861,  and  was  engaged  at  New  York 
City  until  June  30,  1 86 1,  in  receiving  and  forwarding 
volunteers.  He  then  entered  the  field,  ami  was  in  com- 
mand of  a  brigade  in  the  Manassas  campaign,  being 
engaged  in  the  battle  of  first  Bull  Run  July  21,  1861. 
He  was  placed  in  command  at  Alexandria,  Virginia, 
August  1,  1 861,  and  from  September  1,  1861,  to  March, 
1862,  was  in  command  of  a  division  in  the  defences  of 
Washington.  He  entered  on  the  Peninsula  campaign 
with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  in  command  of  a  divi- 
sion, in  March,  1862,  and  was  assigned  to  the  command 
of  the  Sixth  Army  Corps  in  the  following  May,  which 
he  retained  until  August,  1862,  being  engaged  in  the 
siege  of  Yorktown,  combat  of  West  Point,  Virginia  (in 
command);  action  at  Golding's  Farm,  battle  of  White 
Oak  Bridge,  battle  of  Savage  Station,  battle  of  Malvern 
Hill,  and  skirmish  at  Harrison's  Landing. 

Appointed  major-general  of  volunteers  July  4,  1862, 
and  participated  in  the  Maryland  campaign,  being  en- 
gaged (in  command)  at  the  battle  of  Crampton's  Gap, 
South  Mountain  ;  and  was  also  engaged  at  the  battle 
of  Antietam,  September  17,  1862.     After  McClellan's  re- 


lief from  the  command  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  he 
was  placed  in  command  of  the  Left  Grand  Division 
(First  and  Sixth  Corps)  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  to 
January  24,  1863,  having  been  engaged  in  the  battle  of 
Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  December  11- 14,  1862;  was 
on  waiting  orders  to  June  27,  1863,  when  he  was  ordered 
to  the  Department  of  the  Gulf,  being  in  command  of  the 
troops  in  and  about  Baton  Rouge,  Louisiana,  to  August 
15,  1863,  when  he  commanded  the  expedition  to  Sabine 
Pass,  Texas,  and  was  in  command  of  the  Nineteenth 
Army  Corps,  and  of  the  troops  in  Western  Louisiana, 
and  took  part  in  the  Red  River  Expedition,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  battle  of  Sabine  Cross-Roads,  April  8,  1864, 
where  he  was  wounded,  but,  continuing  on  duty,  was  in 
the  battle  of  Pleasant  Hill,  April  9,  1864,  and  action  of 
Monette's  Crossing  of  Cane  River,  April  23,  1864. 

While  on  sick-leave  from  April  29  to  December  2, 
1S64,  he  was  captured  by  rebel  raiders  in  the  Philadel- 
phia and  Baltimore  Railroad  cars,  July  11,  1864,  but 
escaped  during  the  next  night;  was  president  of  board 
for  retiring  disabled  officers,  at  Wilmington,  to  Novem- 
ber 10,  1865,  when  he  was  granted  leave  of  absence  to 
March  15,  1866,  when  he  resigned  from  the  army, 
having  resigned  his  volunteer  commission  November  10, 
1865.  March  13,  1865,  he  was  brevetted  major-general 
U.  S.  Army  "  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the 
field  during  the  Rebellion." 

Upon  entering  civil  life,  General  Franklin  became  gen- 
eral agent  of  Colt's  Fire-Arms  Mf.  Co.,  at  Hartford,  Conn., 
from  November  15,  1865.  He  is  the  only  citizen  of  the 
United  States  upon  whom  has  been  conferred  the  French 
decoration  of  "Grand  Officier  de  la  Legion  d'Honneur." 
Has  been  President  of  the  Board  of  Managers  of  the 
National  House  for  Disabled  Volunteer  Soldiers  since 
April  21,  1880. 


1 58 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR  HENRY   BLANCHARD   FREEMAN,    U.S.A. 

Major  Henry  Blanchard  Freeman  (Sixteenth  In- 
fantry) was  born  in  Ohio  January  17,  1837.  At  the  com- 
mencement of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  he  entered  the 
regular  service  as  private  in  Company  B,  Second  Battalion, 
Eighteenth  Infantry,  July  8,  1861  ;  was  promoted  first 
sergeant,  and  was  discharged  November  4.  1861 ,  to  accept 
the  appointment  of  second  lieutenant  of  the  Eighteenth 
Infantry  to  date  from  October  30,  1861. 

1  le  served  in  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland  in  1862-63, 
and  was  engaged  in  siege  of  Corinth,  Perryville,  Ken- 
tucky, Hoover's  Gap,  Tennessee,  Monroe  Cross  Ro 
North  Carolina,  cavalry  combat  at  Solemn  Grove,  North 
1  arolina,  and  the  battles  of  Murfreesborough  and 
Chickamauga.  He  was  made  prisoner  of  war  in  Sep- 
tember, [863,  and  escaped  from  Libby  prison,  Rich- 
mond, through  the  famous  tunnel,  February  14,  1864, 
but  was  recaptured  three  days  later  on  Appomattox 
River,  above  City  Point.  He  was  one  of  the  officers 
placed  under  the  fire  from  Union  batteries  at  Charleston, 
South  Carolina,  in  August,  1864.  He  again  escaped 
from  a  railway  train  on  the  Savannah  and  Charleston 
Railroad,  the  same  month,  but  surrendered  to  avoid  star- 


vation. In  November,  1864,  he  escaped  from  prison,  Camp 
Sorghum,  near  Columbia,  South  Carolina,  in  November, 
1S64,  and  was  recaptured  ten  days  later.  For  the  fourth 
time  he  escaped  from  prison  at  Columbia,  South  Caro- 
lina, February  14,  1S65,  and  joined  General  Sherman's 
army,  and  was  with  the  Seventeenth  Corps  from  that  date 
to  April,  1865,  when  he  was  on  duty  with  the  head- 
quarter.-, of  Kilpatrick's  Cavalry  Corps,  from  Winsbor- 
ough,  South  Carolina,  to  Fayetteville,  North  Carolina. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  May  30,  1862,  and 
captain  J  Lily  28,  1866,  and  received  the  brevets  of  cap- 
tain December  31,  1862,  for  "gallant  and  meritorious 
services  in  the  battle  of  Murfreesborough.,  Tennessee;" 
and  major  September  20,  1 863,  for  "gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  in  the  battle  of  Chickamauga,  Georgia." 

Lieutenant  Freeman  was  adjutant  of  the  First  Battal- 
ion of  the  Eighteenth  Infantry  from  March  16,  1863 
to  November  1,  1865,  and  was  acting  assistant  adjutant- 
general  of  the  Seventeenth  Army  Corps  from  February 
14,  1865  to  April,  1865. 

Captain  Freeman  served  with  his  regiment  on  the 
frontier  in  the  Department  of  the  Platte  at  Forts  Phil 
Kearney  and  Reno  from  1 866  to  1869,  and  was  on  the 
Republican  River  campaign  of  the  latter  year.  Depart- 
ment of  Dakota  from  April,  1870,  to  1882.  He  com- 
manded two  companies  and  a  detachment  of  the  Seventh 
Infantry  against  the  half  breeds  on  Milk  River,  Montana, 
in  the  fall  of  1871,  and  then  was  stationed  at  Camp 
Baker,  Montana,  to  July,  1875.  He  was  in  command  of 
six  companies  of  the  Seventh  Infantry  in  the  Sioux  cam- 
paign of  1876,  and  commanded  the  escort  to  the  Sitting 
Bull  Commission  to  Fort  Walsh,  Canada,  in  1877.  He 
was  in  command  of  the  troops  at  Rock  Springs,  Wyo- 
ming, from  July  13,  1887,  to  September  20,  1889,  and 
was  then  detailed  on  special  recruiting  service  at  St.  Paul, 
Minnesota,  December  16,  1890,  when  he  was  detailed  as 
a  member  of  the  board  to  select  a  magazine-gun  for  the 
army,  on  which  duty  he  is  at  present  in  New  York 
City. 

He  was  promoted  major  of  infantry  June  19,  iS9i,and 
assigned  to  the  Sixteenth  Regiment. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


159 


MAJOR-GENERAL  JOHN  CHARLES  FREMONT,  U.S.A.. 
F.R.G.S.  (deceased). 

Major- General  John  Charles  Fremont,  F.R.G.S., 
Chevalier  of  the  Prussian  "  Order  of  Merit,"  etc.,  was 
of  Huguenot  parentage  on  his  father's  side,  and  con- 
nected with  the  Washington  family  on  his  mother's.  He 
received  from  the  Charleston  College  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  and  Master  of  Arts  ;  his  mathematical  attain- 
ments especially  fitted  him  for  his  after-life.  In  1838  he 
was  appointed  second  lieutenant  Topographical  Engi- 
neers, U.S.A.,  and  was  Nicollet's  assistant  in  the  two 
explorations  north  of  the  Missouri  in  1838-39.  After 
the  second  of  these  he  married  Jessie  Benton,  daughter 
of  Senator  Thomas  H.  Benton.  In  1S42  he  made  the 
first  of  the  great  explorations  in  the  then  unmapped 
West,  and  continued  them  through  the  years  1842, 
1843-44,  1845-46-47,  1848-49,  1853-54.  The  third 
resulted  in  the  conquest  of  California  by  Captain  Fre- 
mont, to  whom  the  government  sent  as  special  messenger 
Lieutenant  Archibald  Gillespie,  with  instructions  that 
the  President  intended  to  take  possession  of  California. 
Captain  Fremont  was  the  only  army  officer  then  in  that 
Mexican  province,  and  he  acted  for  his  government. 

Later,  General  Kearney  attempted  to  supersede  Com- 
modore Stockton,  the  provisional  military  governor. 
Failing  this,  he  ordered  Captain  Fremont  to  desert 
Stockton.  Captain  Fremont  refused,  and  was  court- 
martialled,  being  thus  kept  from  the  command  of  his 
regiment  during  the  Mexican  War.  He  was  sentenced  to 
dismissal,  but  the  President  disapproved  of  and  re- 
mitted the  sentence.  Colonel  Fremont  considered  the 
sentence  unjust,  and  resigned.  Lie  had  previously  re- 
ceived a  double  brevet  at  the  instigation  of  General 
Scott,  and  had  been  appointed  military  governor  of  Cali- 
fornia. He  then  made  the  exploration  of  1848-49,  in 
which  one-third  of  the  party  died  from  exposure  and 
starvation.  He  was  appointed  by  the  government  com- 
missioner to  run  the  boundary  between  the  United  States 
and  Mexico  ;  and,  later,  elected  first  V.  S.  Senator  from 
California  to  Congress.  In  1853  he  made  his  last 
exploration  across  the  Rocky  Mountains  ;  the  last  two 
explorations  were  made  at  his  own  expense.  In  1856  he 
was  nominated  for  the  Presidency  by  the  just-formed 
Republican  part)',  which  was  defeated.  He  was  in  Eng- 
land at  the  breaking  out  of  the  war  in  1861  ;  offered  his 
services,  and  commenced  buying  arms  for  the  govern- 
ment on  his  own  credit  and  responsibility ;  received  his 
appointment  as  major-general  in  the  regular  army  and 
was  assigned  to  command  the  Western  Department.  He 
was  given  by  President  Lincoln  unlimited  powers  in  his 
own  department.  In  three  months  he  organized  and 
equipped  one  hundred  thousand  men,  having  to  buy  and 
manufacture  most  of  the  weapons  and  clothing.  He 
recognized  the  abilities  of  LT.  S.  Grant,  and  gave  him  his 


first  independent  command,  against  the  advice  of  those 
who  had  known  Captain  Grant,  and  after  the  War  1  tepart- 
ment  and  General  McClellan  had  refused  to  do  so.  He 
was  the  first  to  build  iron-clad  gun-boats.  August  30, 
1861,  General  Fremont  issued  his  proclamation,  emanci- 
pating the  slaves  of  rebels  in  his  department.  He  cleared 
Missouri  of  rebels,  but,  owing  to  political  influences, 
General  Fremont  was  superseded  by  Hunter  on  the  eve 
of  battle.  Hunter  immediately  retreated  from  a  far  in- 
ferior force,  his  trains  and  rear-guard  suffering  severe- 
loss  at  the  rebels'  hands.  General  Fremont  was  then 
placed  in  command  of  the  Mountain  Department,  Vir- 
ginia, and  came  in  on  Jack-son's  rear  during  the  latter's 
retreat  down  the  Valley  of  the  Shenandoah  in  [862,  pur- 
suing him  for  six  days,  and  fighting  a  battle  with  ten  thou- 
sand five  hundred  men  against  Jackson's  seventeen  thou- 
sand, the  forces  under  Fremont  remaining  on  the  field. 

Serious  political  and  personal  controversy  between 
Fremont  and  Lincoln  caused  the  latter  to  refuse  Fre- 
mont another  command,  and  Fremont  resigned,  to  accept, 
fune  4,  1864,  the  nomination  to  the  Presidency,  tendered 
him  by  the  convention  which  met  at  Cleveland,  Ohio. 
The  division  of  the  Republican  party  following  the  rival 
candidacy  of  Fremont  and  Lincoln  would  have  resulted 
in  the  election  of  the  Democratic  candidate,  and  Lincoln 
sent  Senator  Zach.  Chandler  to  Fremont,  to  ask  him  to 
withdraw,  and  General  Fremont  did  so,  to  save  the  party. 

General  Fremont  now  embarked  his  large  fortune  in 
the  building  of  a  trans-continental  railway,  but  through 
the  dishonest}'  of  agents  lost  every  dollar.  In  March, 
1878,  a  full  release  on  all  accounts  and  charges  was  given 
General  Fremont,  the  courts  having  found  that  the 
charges  made  against  him  in  1872  by  these  agents  were 
altogether  false.  In  1878  General  Fremont  was  appointed 
Governor  of  Arizona  Territory.  In  1890  General  Fre- 
mont was  placed  on  the  retired  list  of  the  army,  with  his 
former  rank  of  major-general.     Died  July  13,  1890. 


i6o 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  {regular) 


CAPTAIN  J.   H.   GAGF.BY.   U.S.A. 

Captain  I.  H.  Gageby  (Third  Infantry)  was  born  at 
fohnstown,  Pennsylvania,  September  5,  1836.  He  is  of 
Scotch-Irish  descent.  His  grandfather,  James  Gageby, 
was  in  Independence  Hall  when  the  Declaration  of  Inde- 
pendence was  read,  and  fought  through  the  entire  Revo- 
lutionary War  and  afterwards  settled  111  Westmoreland 
Count)-,  Pennsylvania. 

Entered  the  army  as  sergeant  of  Company  K,  Third 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  April  19,  1 861,  and  was  actively 
engaged  at  the  battle  of  Falling  Waters,  Virginia,  July 
2,  1S61.  lie  enlisted  in  the  Nineteenth  U.  S.  Infantry 
October  25,  1861,  and  was  appointed  first  sergeant 
from  the  date  of  his  enlistment.  His  company  joined 
the  Army  of  the  Potomac  at  Harrison's  Landing  July  4, 
1862,  and  was  with  it  through  the  battles  of  South 
Mountain  and  Antietam,  Maryland,  and  Fredericksburg, 
Virginia,  when  it  was  transferred  to  the  Army  of  the 
( iumberland  March,  1863. 

He  was  appointed  a  second  lieutenant  of  the  Nine- 
teenth Infantry  June  1,  1S63,  and  promoted  first  lieuten- 
ant December  28,  1 863. 

He  was  in  command  of  Company  G,  Nineteenth  In- 
fantry, at  the  battle  of  Hoover's  Gap,  Tennessee,  June 
20,  [863,  for  which  he  was  brevetted  for  "  gallant  and 
meritorious  services  in  action." 

lie  was  actively  engaged  in  several  severe  skirmishes 
during  the  march  to  the  battle  of  Chickamauga,  in  which 
latter  engagement  he  was  wounded  and  made  a  prisoner 
of  war  September  20,  1S63,  and  was  again  brevetted  for 
gallant  anil  meritorious  services  in  this  battle. 


He  remained  a  prisoner  of  war  in  the  different  South- 
ern prisons, — Atlanta,  Augusta,  Libby  Prison,  Virginia; 
Danville,  Virginia;  Macon,  Georgia  ;  Charleston,  South 
Carolina  (under  the  fire  of  our  own  artillery  in  1S64); 
Columbia,  South  Carolina;  Charlotte,  Raleigh,  Golds- 
borough,  and  Wilmington,  North  Carolina,  from  which 
place  he  was  exchanged  on  parole  March  1,  1865. 
Total  length  of  imprisonment,  seventeen  months  and 
ten  days. 

Lieutenant  Gageby  was  one  of  Colonel  Rose's  party, 
when  the  latter  commenced  work  on  the  second  tunnel 
to  escape  from  Libby  Prison,  at  Richmond,  Virginia. 
Although  he  did  not  actually  work  in  the  tunnel,  he 
performed  the  necessary  duty  in  the  prison  to  prevent  its 
discovery  while  in  progress.  He  was  Number  23,  of  the 
one  hundred  and  ten  who  escaped  by  the  famous  tunnel 
in  February,  1864,  but  he  was,  unfortunately,  recaptured 
and  confined  in  the  dungeon  at  Libby  Prison  several 
days,  and  subsequently  transferred  to  the  prisons  farther 
South. 

Lieutenant  Gageby  was  appointed  a  captain  July  28, 
1 866,  and  assigned  to  the  Thirty-seventh  United  States 
Infantry. 

In  the  winter  of  1868-69  he  was  in  command  of  the 
Infantry  column  with  Colonel  Evans's  expedition  against 
the  Comanches,  and  was  actively  engaged  in  the  fight 
with  those  Indians  all  day  of  Christmas,  186S,  in  which 
their  village  of  sixty  lodges  was  destroyed.  Colonel 
Evans's  letter  to  him,  concerning  the  fight,  says,  "  The 
marching  of  your  men  was  the  talk  and  wonder  of  the 
column,  and  you  held  the  line  until  their  supplies  were 
destroyed;  and  on  no  one  did  I  place  more  dependence 
than  yourself,  and  you  are  eminently  deserving  of  a 
brevet  for  this  fight, — certainly  as  much  so  as  my- 
self." 

Captain  Gageby  participated  also  in  the  campaign  of 
General  Brooke  against  the  Mesceleros  and  Sierra 
Diablo  Lipan  Apache  Indians  in  April  and  May,  1869, 
and  was  then  transferred  to  the  Third  Infantry  August 
1 1 ,  1 S69. 

From  1874  to  1S77,  the  captain  was  employed  on 
"  reconstruction  duty"  in  the  Bayou  Teche  district  ot 
Louisiana,  and  several  letters  commendatory  of  his  ser- 
vice there  are  on  file  in  the  War  Department,  from  Mr. 
Packard  and  others. 

He  was  on  leave  at  his  home  in  Johnstown,  Pennsyl- 
vania, at  the  time  of  the  great  flood  in  1889,  and  was 
placed  on  duty  there  for  several  months  by  order  of  the 
Secretary  of  War. 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


161 


CAPTAIN  FRANK  DILLON   GARRETTY,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Frank  Dillon  Garrettv  (Seventeenth  In- 
fantry) was  born  in  Ireland  February  4,  1 829.  He 
entered  the  military  service  as  second  lieutenant  of  Com- 
pany G,  Fifteenth  Kentucky  Infantry,  December  14, 
1 861.  He  served  with  the  Army  of  the  West  during 
the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  and  was  with  his  regiment 
in  the  spring  of  1862,  at  the  capture  of  Howling  Green, 
Kentucky;  Nashville,  Murfreesborough,  Shelbyville,  and 
Fayetteville,  Tennessee ;  and  Huntsville,  Alabama.  He 
marched  with  his  regiment,  August  31,  1862,  to  Perry  - 
ville,  Kentucky,  and  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Perryville, 
October  8,  1862,  where  he  was  wounded.  He  was 
honorably  discharged  June  2j,  1863,  for  physical  disa- 
bility. 

He  received  his  commission  as  first  lieutenant  of  the 
Veteran  Reserve  Corps  October  2,  1863,  and  was  guard- 
ing prisoncrs-of-war  at  Indianapolis,  and  Camp  Doug- 
las, at  Chicago,  during  the  years  1864-65.  He  was  on 
duty  in  the  State  of  Louisiana  from  January,  1866,  to 
April,  1869,  as  agent  and  acting  commissioner  of  the 
Freedmen's  Bureau.  While  on  this  duty,  he  was  com- 
missioned as  second  lieutenant  of  the  Forty-third  In- 
fantry July  28,  1866,  and  first  lieutenant  January  11, 
1868.  He  was  ordered  on  duty  in  the  State  of  Iowa,  as 
agent  of  the  Sac  and  Fox  Indians,  1869-70.  On  the 
15th  of  December,  1870,  Lieutenant  Garretty  was  trans- 
ferred to  the   Seventeenth   Infantry,  and   was   on    dutv 


with  his  regiment  in  Dakota,  from  1871  to  1886,  partici- 
pating with  his  company  on  the  Stanley  expedition  in 
1872,  and  also  on  the  Custer  campaign  of  1876. 

Lieutenant  Garretty  was  promoted  captain  June  26, 
1882,  and  moved  with  his  regiment  from  Dakota  to  Fort 
D.  A.  Russell,  Wyoming,  in  1886.  He  was  on  recruit- 
ing duty  at  Chicago,  Illinois,  and  St.  Paul,  Minnesota, 
from  1886  to  1888,  and  with  his  company  and  regiment 
during  1889-90,  when  he  was  again  placed  on  recruiting 
duty  in  October,  1890. 


1 62 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


COLONEL  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL   GEORGE 
W.  GETTY,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Colonel  and  Bkevet  Major-Genekal  George  W. 
Getty  was  born  in  Georgetown,  D.  C,  in  1819,  and 
was  graduated  at  the  Military  Academy  in  the  Class 
oi  1840.  Receiving  his  appointment  as  second  lieu- 
tenant (if  the  Fourth  U.  S.  Artillery,  he  was  assigned 
to  duty  in  the  State  of  Michigan,  and  was  engaged 
during  the  fall  and  winter  of  1840-41  in  removing  the 
Pottawatomie  tribe  of  Indians  from  that  State  to  their 
reservation  west  of  the  Mississippi  River,  and  on  the 
Northern  frontier  during  the  Canada-border  disturbances, 
1841-42;  served  in  the  war  with  Mexico,  1847-48,  and 
was  in  the  battles  of  Contreras,  Churubusco,  and  Molino 
del  Rev;  the  storming  of  Chapultepec  and  assault  and 
capture  of  City  of  Mexico,  and  received  the  brevet  of 
captain  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  in  the  battles 
of  Contreras  and  Churubusco;"  was  afterwards  engaged 
in  the  Florida  hostilities  against  the  Seminole  Indians, 
1849-50  and  1856-57;  on  frontier  duty,  1857-60,  in 
quelling  disturbances  in  that  State.  Served  during  the 
Rebellion,  being  engaged  with  Confederate  batteries  on 
the  Potomac  River  near  Budd's  Ferry,  Maryland;  Vir- 
ginia Peninsula  campaign;  engaged  in  the  siege  of 
Yorktown,  battles  of  Gaines'  Mill  and  Malvern  Hill;  in 
the  Maryland  campaign,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  being 
engaged  in  the  battles  of  South  Mountain  and  Antietam, 
and  the  march  to  Falmouth,  Virginia:  served  in  the 
Rappahannock  campaign,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  being 
engaged  in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg,  Virginia;  in 
the  operations  about  Suffolk,  Virginia,  on  the  line  of  the 
Nansemond  River;  in  command  of  the  Third  Division 
of  the  Ninth  Army  Corps  during  the  defence  of  Suffolk, 
April  1  I,  May  3,  1863  ;  in  command  of  storming  column 
in  the  assault  of  Hill's   Point  Works  and  Battery,  April 


19,  1863  ;  in  the  Richmond  campaign,  being  engaged  in 
the  battle  of  the  Wilderness,  where  he  was  severely 
wounded  while  in  command  of  the  division;  in  the  siege 
of  Petersburg,  and  expedition  to  Reams'  Station  and 
Weldon  Railroad,  1864;  in  the  defence  of  Washington 
City,  July  11-12,  1864,  and  in  the  pursuit  of  the  army 
under  General  Early  to  the  Shenandoah  Valley,  July  13 
to  \ugust  9,  1864;  in  the  Shenandoah  campaign,  being 
engaged  in  the  action  of  Charlestown,  battles  of  Opequan, 
Fisher's  Hill,  and  Cedar  Creek-;  served  in  the  siege  of 
Petersburg,  being  engaged  in  the  assaults  of  March  25 
and  April  2,  1865,  upon  the  enemy's  works;  in  the 
pursuit  of  the  Army  of  Northern  Virginia,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  battle  of  Sailor's  Creek,  April  6,  1865,  and 
was  at  the  capitulation  of  General  R.  E.  Lee,  with  that 
army.  General  Getty  was  appointed  lieutenant-colonel 
and  aide-de-camp  in  September,  1861  ;  brigadier-gen- 
eral of  volunteers  September  25,  1862,  in  which  latter 
grade  he  served  until  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  ser- 
vice October  9,  1866.  He  passed  through  the  various 
grades  in  the  regular  service  from  lieutenant  to  major, 
and  was  made  colonel  of  the  Thirty-seventh  U.  S.  In- 
fantry July  28,  1866,  and  afterwards  transferred  to  the 
Third  Infantry,  subsequently  to  the  Third  Artillery,  and 
finally  to  the  Fourth  Artillery,  from  which  he  was  retired 
for  age  October  2,  1883.  General  Getty  was,  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services,  made  brevet  lieutenant-colonel 
during  the  siege  of  Suffolk;  colonel,  for  battle  of  the 
Wilderness  ;  brigadier-general,  for  capture  of  Petersburg  ; 
major-general,  for  services  during  the  war  ;  major-general 
of  volunteers,  for  Winchester  and  Fisher's  Hill,  Virginia. 
The  petition  of  General  Getty  to  Congress  to  be  retired 
on  the  grade  of  major-general  received  the  following 
complimentary  indorsement : 

"  Head-quarters  of  the  Army,  Washington,  D.  C, 
January  26,  1883. —  .  .  .  George  Getty  as  a  boy  and  man, 
through  a  long,  eventful  life,  has  been  a  model  gentleman 
and  soldier,  of  unexceptional  habits,  of  superior  intelli- 
gence, and  high  professional  acquirements.  lie  has  al- 
ways been  selected  in  war  and  peace  for  high  and 
responsible  commands.  Modest  to  a  fault,  he  has  never 
pushed  himself  forward  into  undue  prominence,  but  has 
done  well  all  that  he  was  appointed  to  do,  and  has  always 
been  sought  for  by  his  services  for  posts  requiring  high 
qualification  and  professional  excellence.  ...  I  most  re- 
spectfully represent  that  the  principle  of  common  justice 
seems  to  demand  that  General  Getty  should,  during  his 
lew  remaining  years,  have,  for  the  support  of  himself  and 
of  his  dependent  family,  the  retired  pay  of  a  major-gen- 
eral. Even  this  will  fall  far  short  of  compensation  for  the 
labor  and  responsibility  imposed  on  him  by  superior  au- 
thority in  exacting  from  him  the  work  of  a  major-general 
on  the  pay  of  a  colonel. 

(Signed)  "W.  T.  Sherman,  General." 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


163 


REAR-ADMIRAL  BANCROFT  GHERARDI,   U.S.N. 

Rear-Admiral  Bancroft  Gherardi  is  now  the 
senior  officer  on  the  active  list  of  the  U.  S.  Navy,  and  is 
credited  in  the  official  register  with  nearly  twenty-five 
years  of  sea-service,  while  his  "  shore  duty"  has  comprised 
almost  every  variety  of  employment  which  can  fall  to  the 
lot  of  a  naval  officer.  He  is  the  nephew  of  the  eminent 
historian,  George  Bancroft,  who  was  the  Secretary  of  the 
Navy  to  whom  the  U.  S.  Naval  Academy  is  indebted  for 
its  existence  more  than  to  any  other  one  person  ;  and  who 
was  for  so  many  years,  our  excellent  Minister  at  the  Court 
of  Berlin. 

Admiral  Gherardi  was  born  in  Louisiana  November 
IO,  1832,  but  was  appointed  from  Massachusetts  in  June, 
1 846.  He  made  a  cruise  of  nearly  f<  mr  years  in  the  line- 
of-battle  ship  "  Ohio"  during  the  Mexican  War,  and  after- 
wards. He  then  served  in  the  "  Saranac,"  of  the  Home 
Squadron,  and,  after  a  course  at  the  U.  S.  Naval  Academy, 
became  passed  midshipman  in  1852  ;  after  a  cruise  in  the 
Mediterranean,  he  was  promoted  master  in  1 S 5 5  ;  and 
lieutenant  in  the  same  year.  He  next  served  in  the 
"  Saratoga,"  Home  Squadron;  the  Boston  rendezvous; 
and  the  steam-sloop  "  Lancaster,"  in  the  Pacific.  He 
was  commissioned  lieutenant-commander  July,  1862; 
and  attached  to  the  South  Atlantic  Blockading  Squad- 
ron. In  an  engagement  with  Fort  Macon,  1862  ;  steam- 
sloop  "  Mohican  ;"  on  special  service  in  1S63.  He  was 
then  ordered  to  the  West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron,  in 
which  he  commanded  the  "  Chocura"  and  the  "  Port 
Royal ;"  he  took  part  in  the  battle  of  Mobile  Bay,  August 
5,  1864,  in  the  latter  vessel.  He  next  commanded  the 
"  Pequot,"  in  the  North  Atlantic  Squadron,  until  the  close 
of  the  war. 

He  was  commissioned  as  commander  July  25,  1866, 
and  was  stationed  at  Philadelphia  at  the  naval  ren- 
dezvous and  the  navy-yard  until    1870.     He  then  took 


command  of  the  "Jamestown,"  in  the  Pacific,  and  of  the 
receiving-ship  "  Independence"  at  Mare  Island,  after  leav- 
ing the  "Jamestown." 

He  was  commissioned  as  captain  in  November,  1874, 
and  commanded  the  flag-ship  "  Pensacola,"  of  the  North 
Pacific  Station,  for  two  years.  From  1877  to  1880  he 
was  in  command  of  the  receiving-ship  "  Colorado." 
After  this  he  was  for  three  years  in  command  of  the 
"  Lancaster,"  flag-ship  of  the  European  Squadron.  When 
the  "  Lancaster"  came  home  he  obtained  a  year's  leave 
to  travel  in  Europe,  and  during  that  time  he  received 
his  promotion  as  commodore.  In  1884-85  he  was  a 
member  of  the  Examining  Board,  and  in  1885-86  was 
governor  of  the  Naval  Asylum  at  Philadelphia.  His 
promotion  as  rear-admiral  dates  from  August,  1887, 
when  he  was  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  navy-yard 
at  New  York.  In  1889  he  was  ordered  to  the  command 
of  the  North  Atlantic  Station,  which  he  retains  at  this 
writing. 


164 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   XAVY  (regular) 


BRIGADIER-  AND    BREVET    MAJOR-GENERAL   JOHN 
GIBBON,   U.S.A.   (retired). 

Brigadier-  and  Brevet  Major-General  John  Gib- 
bon was  born  in  Pennsylvania  April  20,  1827,  and  grad- 
uated from  the  Military  Academy  July  1,  [847.  He- 
was  promoted  brevet  second  lieutenant,  Third  Artillery, 
the  same  day,  and  second  lieutenant,  Fourth  Artillery, 
September  13,  1847.  He  served  in  the  war  with  Mexico, 
at  the  City  of  Mexico  and  Toluca,  in  1 847, and  in  garrison 
at  Fort  Monroe  in  1848.  Hewas  then  ordered  to  Florida, 
and  participated  in  the  hostilities  against  the  Seminole 
Indians  until  1S50,  when  hewas  promoted  first  lieutenant 
and  ordered  to  Texas,  serving  at  Fort  Brown  and  Ring- 
gold Barracks  until  1S52.  After  availing  himself  of  a 
leave  of  absence,  hewas  employed  in  removing  the  Semi- 
nole Indians  from  Florida  to  the  west  of  the  Mississippi 
from  May  to  August,  1S54,  upon  the  conclusion  of  which 
he  was  detailed  at  the  Military  Academy  as  assistant 
instructor  ol  artillery,  as  quartermaster,  and  as  a  member 
of  a  board  to  test  breech-loading  rifles  to  1857. 

He  was  promoted  captain  November  2,  1859,  and  was 
on  sick-leave  of  absence  in  1859-60.  In  1860-61  lie  was 
on  frontier  dutyin  Utah,  and  marched  from  Fort  Critten- 
den, Utah,  to  fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  at  the  breaking 
out  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion. 

Captain  Gibbon  served  as  chief  of  artillery  of  General 
McDowell's  division  in  the  fall  and  winter  of  1861-62, 
and  was  appointed  a  brigadier-general  of  volunteers  May 
2,  1862,  and  assigned  to  the  command  of  a  brigade  in 
the  Department  of  the  Rappahannock.  He  took  part  in 
all  the  campaigns  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  was 


engaged  in  the  action  of  Gainesville,  battles  of  second 
Bull  Run,  South  Mountain,  Antietam,  Fredericksburg 
(wounded),  Marye  Heights,  and  Gettysburg,  where  he 
was  severely  wounded  while  commanding  the  Second 
Army  Corps. 

He  was  then  on  leave  of  absence,  on  account  of  wounds, 
to  November  15,  1S63,  when  he  was  placed  in  command 
of  the  draft  depot  at  Cleveland,  Ohio,  for  a  short  time, 
but  subsequently  transferred  to  Philadelphia,  where  he 
remained  until  March  21,  1864. 

Upon  rejoining  for  duty  in  the  field.  General  Gibbon 
was  assigned  to  the  command  of  a  division  in  the  Second 
Army  Corps,  and  participated  in  the  Richmond  campaign 
of  1864,  being  engaged  in  the  battles  of  the  Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania,  North  Anna,  Tolopotomy,  Cold  Harbor,  and 
the  siege  of  Petersburg.  He  was  appointed  major-general 
of  volunteers  June  7,  1864,  and  was  assigned  to  the  com- 
mand of  the  Twenty-fourth  Army  Corps  (Army  of  the 
James  1,  and  while  in  command  of  that  corps  participated 
in  the  campaign  of  1865,  and  was  engaged  in  the  assaults 
on  the  enemy's  works  April  1  and  2,  and  the  pursuit  of 
the  enemy,  terminating  in  the  surrender  of  Lee's  army  at 
Appomattox  Court-House  April  9,  1865,  he  being  one 
of  the  commissioners  to  can'}-  into  effect  the  stipulations 
for  the  surrender. 

He  was  brevetted  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services 
as  follows:  Major,  September  17,  1862,  for  Antietam; 
lieutenant-colonel,  December  13,  1S62,  for  Fredericks- 
burg; colonel,  July  4,  1863,  for  Gettysburg;  brigadier- 
general,  March  13,  [865, for  Spottsylvania;  major-general, 
same  date,  for  capture  of  Petersburg. 

After  being  on  various  duties  until  January  15,  [866, 
General  Gibbon  was  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  ser- 
\  ice,  and  was  a  member  of  the  board  to  make  recom- 
mendations for  brevet  promotions.  He  was  appointed 
colonel  of  the  Thirty-sixth  Infantry  July  28,  1866,  and 
served  with  his  regiment  on  the  frontiers  at  various  posts 
in  the  West  and  Northwest.  He  was,  in  the  consoli- 
dation of  regiments,  transferred  to  the  Seventh  Infantry 
March  15,  1869,3111!  participated  with  his  regiment  in 
the  expedition  against  hostile  Sioux  Indians  in  1S76,  and 
was  also  engaged  with  the  Nez  Perces  Indians  in  1877. 
Wounded  at  battle  of  Big  Hole,  Montana  Territory, 
August  9,  1877. 

General  Gibbon  was  appointed  brigadier-general  U.  S. 
Arm)-  Jul)'  10,  1885,  and  was  assigned  to  the  command 
of  the  Department  of  the  Columbia,  but  in  18S9  was 
placed  in  command  of  the  Military  Division  of  the  Pacific, 
which  command  he  retained  until  retired,  by  operation 
of  law,  April  20,  1 89 1. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


165 


MEDICAL  DIRECTOR  ALBERT  LEARY  GIHON,  U.S.N. 

Medical  Director  Albert  Leary  Gihon  was  born 
in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  September  28,  1833;  re- 
ceived degrees  of  A. B.  1850,  M.D.  1852,  and  A.M.  1854; 
was  Professor  of  Chemistry  and  Toxicology  in  the  Phila- 
delphia College  of  Medicine  and  Surgery,  1853-54. 

Entered  navy  as  assistant  surgeon  May  i,  1855  ;  first 
duty  on  board  receiving-ship  "  Union,"  navy-yard,  Phila- 
delphia ;  attached  to  sloop-of-war  "  Levant,"  East  India 
Station,  1855-58  ;  was  in  the  sloop-of-war  "  Portsmouth's" 
gig,  November  15,  1856,  when  fired  upon  by  the  Chinese 
while  attempting  to  pass  the  Barrier  Forts  on  the  Pearl 
River,  near  Canton,  and  participated  as  one  of  the  landing 
party,  in  the  subsequent  engagements,  which  resulted 
in  the  capture  of  these  forts,  November  16,  20,  21,  and 
22,  1856;  attached  to  brig  "Dolphin,"  1858-59,  dining 
Paraguay  Expedition  ;  and  to  sloop-of-war  "  Preble," 
1859,  on  the  coast  of  Central  America  and  Panama. 

Became  passed  assistant  surgeon  May  1,  i860;  Naval 
Hospital,  Brooklyn,  New  York,  1860-61  ;  brig  "  Perry," 
1 86 1,  on  the  blockade  of  Fernandina,  Florida,  and 
cruising  off  the  Atlantic  coast  of  the  Southern  States, 
capturing  the  rebel  privateer  "Savannah,"  the  first  Con- 
federate letter-of-marque,  May  1,  1861. 

Promoted  to  surgeon,  August  1,  1861  ;  naval  rendez- 
vous, New  York  ;  sloop-of-war  "  St.  Louis,"  1862-65,  on 
special  service  upon  European  Station  and  cruising 
among  the  Atlantic  Islands  after  Confederate  steamers 
"  Alabama,"  "  Florida,"  ami  "  Georgia";  and  in  latter  part 
of  1S64  on  blockade  of  coast  of  South  Carolina;  senior 
medical  officer,  navy-yard,  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire, 
1865-68; 

He  was  attached  to  United  States  ship  "  Idaho,"  1868- 
70,  anchored  at  Nagasaki,  Japan,  as  hospital-ship  for  the 
Asiatic  Station,  and  was  on  board  during  the  memorable 
typhoon  of  September  21,  1869,  when  ship  was  wrecked 
by  passing  through  centre  of  a  cyclone,  with  barometer 
at  27.62  in. ;  for  services  rendered  Portuguese  colony  at 
Dilly,  Island  of  Timor,  and  the  Portuguese  men-of-war 
"  Principe  Dom  Carlos"  and  "  Sa  da  Bandeira,"  received 
from  the  King  of  Portugal,  with  the  consent  of  Congress, 
the  decoration  of  Knight  of  the  Military  Order  of  Christ ; 
for  services  to  H.  B.  M.  ships  "  Flint"  and  "  Dawn,"  the 
thanks  of  the  British  government ;  and  for  similar  services 
to  the  French  gun-boat  "  Scorpion"  those  of  the  Com- 
mander-in-Chief of  the  French  East  India  Station  ;  special 
duty  at  New  York,  1870;  subsequently  marine  rendez- 
vous, Phila. ;  and  later  member  of  Naval  Medical  Board 
of  Examiners  at   Phila.,    1870-72,  and   at  Washington, 

I872-73- 

Promoted  to  medical  inspector  November  7,  1872; 
special  duty  at  Bureau  of  Medicine  and  Surgery,  Navy 
Department,  1873,  and  same  year  ordered  to  flag-ship 
"  Wabash"    as    surgeon-of-the-fleet    on    the    European 


Station  ;  at  Key  West,  Florida,  with  naval  expedition  of 
[874,  and  returned  to  European  Station  as  surgcon-of- 
the-fleet,  on  board  the  flag-ship  "Franklin,"  1874-75; 
head  of  medical  department  at  Naval  Academy,  Annap- 
olis, Maryland,  1875-80;  at  request  of  chief  of  Bureau 
of  Medicine  and  Surgery  designed  and  superintended 
construction  of  model  of  hospital-ship  for  Centennial 
Exhibition  at  Philadelphia,  1867,  and  at  same  Exhibition 
presented  "Ambulance  Cot,"  bearing  his  name,  which 
was  approved  by  Board  of  Officers,  Jul}'  5,  1877,  and 
adopted  for  use  in  the  navy;  appointed  Inspector  of  Re- 
cruits and  Recruiting  Stations,  November  20,  187S. 

Commissioned  medical  director  August  20,  1879;  in 
charge  of  Naval  Hospital,  Norfolk,  Va.,  1880;  member 
of  Board  of  Inspection  of  the  Navy,  1880-83  ;  in  charge 
of  the  Naval  Hospital,  Washington,  D.  C,  1883-86;  of 
Naval  Hospital,  Mare  Island,  California,  1886-88;  and 
of  Naval  Hospital,  Brooklyn,  New  York,  1888-92. 

Has  represented  the  Medical  Department  of  the  Navy 
since  1876  to  the  present  time  in  the  prominent  national 
medical,  sanitary,  and  climatological  associations  and  in- 
ternational medical  congresses,  and  been  honored  by 
election  to  their  highest  offices  ;  is  member  of  various 
American  and  foreign  historical  and  scientific  societies, 
fellow  and  ex-president  of  the  American  Academy  of 
Medicine,  and  member  of  the  military  order  of  the  Loyal 
Legion  of  the  United  States. 

He  is  the  author  of  numerous  papers  and  addresses 
on  Naval  Hygiene,  Public  Health,  Sanitary  Reform, 
State  Medicine,  Higher  Medical  Education,  Vital  Statis- 
tics, Medical  Demography,  and  Climatology;  contri- 
butor to  literary  magazines  and  other  periodicals,  and  of 
articles  on  medical  and  surgical  subjects  to  professional 
journals  and  other  publications;  and  since  1887  one  of 
the  editors  of  the  "Annual  of  the  Universal  Medical 
Sciences." 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   XAVY  IREGUlab) 


CAPTAIN  ERASMUS  C.  GILBREATH,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Erasmus  C.  Gilbreath  (Eleventh  Infantry) 
was  born  in  Guernsey  County,  Ohio,  May  13,  1840,  and 
entered  the  volunteer  service  as  first  lieutenant  of  tin 
Twentieth  Indiana  Infantry  July  22,  1861.  Hewas  pro- 
moted captain  December  7,  1862,  and  major  of  the  same 
regiment  July  27,  1863.  He  served  in  the  First  Brigade, 
First  Division  of  the  Third  Army  Corps,  from  June  8, 
1862,  to  the  breaking  up  of  the  Third  Corps  in  March, 
1  Si  14,  participating  in  the  campaigns  of  that  corps  with 
the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  engaged  in  the  action  at 
Chickamicomico,  near  Fort  Hatteras,  the  "  Merrimac" 
fight  with  the  "  Congress"  and  "  Cumberland,"  action  at 
1  >ak  Grove,  Virginia,  Seven  Days'  Battles,  skirmish  at 
Rappahannock  Station,  battles  of  second  Bull  Run, 
Chantilly,  Fredericksburg  (where  he  was  wounded), 
Chancellorsville  (slightly  wounded),  Gettysburg,  Kelly's 
Ford,  Mine  Run  (especially  Locust  Grove),  the  Wil- 
derness, Spottsylvania,  Cold  Harbor,  siege  of  Peters- 
burg,— including  all  the  movements  and  operations  of 
the  Third  Division  Second  Army  Corps,  from  March  to 
1  ii  tober,  1864. 

Honorably  mustered  out  of  the  Twentieth  Indiana  In- 
fantry <  >ctober  19,  1864,  and  was  appointed  captain  and 
assistant  quartermaster  of  volunteers  January  23,  1865, 
from  which  position  he  was  mustered  out  July  28,  180;, 
and  appointed  lieutenant-colonel  in  Hancock's  Corps,  on 
the  approval  of  Major-General  Hancock,  February  14, 
1865.  He  1  ommanded  the  Twentieth  Indiana  during  the 
battle  of  Gettysburg,  from  the  time  of  the  death  of  Colonel 
Wheeler,  at  the  beginning  of  the  action,  to  the  1  lose  of 
the  fighting  on  the  2d  ;  Lieutenant-Colonel  Taylor  having 
been  wounded,  acted  as  major  from  the  4th  of  fuly,  1863, 
when  commissioned,  though  not  formally  mustered  into 
service  as  major  until  July   2;,  [863.     He  commanded 


the  Seventeenth  Maine  Infantry,  by  order  of  Major-Gen- 
eral D.  B.  Birney,  from  June  17  to  about  June  30,  1864, 
and  was  in  command  of  that  regiment  in  the  charge 
on  the  Confederate  lines  in  front  of  Petersburg,  June  17, 
1864,  and  again  in  the  charge  at  the  Hare  House,  June 
18,  1864. 

Captain  Gilbreath  entered  the  regular  service  as  first 
lieutenant  of  the  P'ifteenth  Infantry  February  23,  1866, 
was  transferred  to  the  Twenty-fourth  Infantry  September 
j  1,  [866,  ami  again  transferred  to  the  Eleventh  Infantry 
April  25,  1869. 

He  was  assigned  to  various  complicated  duties  in 
connection  with  the  reconstruction  of  the  States  of  Mis- 
sissippi and  Texas  ;  in  Mississippi,  sub-commissioner 
of  Freedmen's  Bureau  in  charge  of  that  district,  having 
charge  of  the  counties  now  called  Copiah,  Simpson, 
Lincoln,  Lawrence,  Amite,  Pike,  and  Marion, —  eighteen 
thousand  freedmen  living  in  the  district.  He  had  charge 
of  the  registration  and  election  in  the  counties  named  in 
October,  1867  (see  testimony  of  Brevet  Major-General 
A.  C.  Gillem,  U.S.A.,  before  the  Committee  on  the  Con- 
duct of  the  War,  given  in  1 868  in  relation  thereto).  In 
Texas  he  had  charge  of  the  reconstruction  and  reor- 
ganization of  Montgomery  County  from  September, 
1 868,  to  May,  1869,  promoted  captain  of  Company  11, 
Eleventh  Inf.  December  23,  1873.  He  was  in  command  of 
Company  II,  Eleventh  Infantry,  in  the  campaign  against 
hostile  Comanche  Indians,  from  November  8,  1874,  to 
January  20,  1875,  when  he  was  compelled  to  go  on  sick 
report  on  account  of  wound  received  at  Fredericksburg, 
Virginia,  December  [3,  1862,  and  on  sick-leave  of  absence 
from  same  cause  from  May  17,  1875,  to  March  27,  1876. 
Hewas  in  command  of  c<  impanyin  the  movement  October 
22,  1870,  at  Standing  Rock,  Dakota  Territory,  the  result 
of  which  movement  was  the  disarming  of  the  Blackfeet 
and  Yankton  Indians  at  that  Agency.  He  selected  the 
site  for  and  established  the  depot  at  Terry's  Landing, 
Montana  Territory,  at  the  head  of  navigation  on  the 
Yellowstone  River.  He  took  the  field  with  his  company 
against  hostile  Bannock  Indians  from  August  31  to  Sep- 
tember 13,  1  878,  and  was  then  in  charge  of  the  construc- 
tion of  the  military  telegraph  line  from  Fort  Custer, 
Montana  Territory,  to  the  Yellowstone  River — 48  miles 
— from  December  3  to  16,  1S78.  He  was  appointed  in- 
spector ol  Indian  Supplies  at  the  Crow  Agency,  Montana 
Territory,  from  September  5,  1 879,  to  July  2S,  1880. 
While  inspector  of  Indian  Supplies  at  the  Crow  Agency, 
Montana  Territory,  he  assisted  the  agent  for  the  three 
thousand  three  hundred  Crow  Indians  in  negotiating  a 
treaty  by  which  they  gave  up  and  sold  two  million  acres 
of  land  at  the  west  end  of  their  reservation,  and  he  signed 
this  treaty  in  his  official  capacity. 

Captain  Gilbreath  i-  a  member  of  the  G.  A.  R.,  Loyal 
Legion,  and  the  Second  and  Third  Corps  societies. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


167 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL    AND   BREVET   BRIGADIER- 
GENERAL   GEORGE  W.  GILE,   U.S.A.  (retired). 

Lieutenant- Colonel  and  Brevet   Brigadier-Gen- 

eral  George  W.  Gile  was  born  in  Bethlehem,  N.  H., 
January  2?,  1830.  His  record  of  service  was  furnished 
by  Adjutant-General  R.  C.  Drum  to  a  committee  of 
Congress  in  1884,  and  is  given  herewith  : 

"He  entered  the  service  April  23,  1861,  as  first  lieu- 
tenant Twenty-second  Penn.  Inf.,  and  served  to  August  7, 
1 86 1 ,  upon  which  date  he  was  honorably  mustered  out, 
his  term  of  service  having  expired. 

"He  re-entered  the  service  Sept.  16,  1861,  as  major 
Eighty-eighth  Penn.  Inf.,  and  was  promoted  lieutenant- 
colonel  Sept.  I,  1862,  and  colonel  Jan.  24,   [863. 

"  He  served  with  his  regiment  in  the  defences  of  Wash- 
ington, the  Arm}'  of  Virginia,  and  the  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  from  Oct.  I,  1 86 1,  to  Sept.  17,  1862,  upon  whii  li 
date  he  was  wounded  in  the  battle  of  Antietam,  while  in 
command  of  his  regiment;  was  absent  by  reason  of 
wound  until  honorably  discharged  on  account  of  dis- 
ability, March  2,  1S63.  Was  appointed  major  in  the 
Veteran  Reserve  Corps  May  22,  1863,  and  colonel  Sept. 
29,  1863. 

"  He  served  as  a  member  of  a  Board  of  Examiners 
for  the  Veteran  Reserve  Corps  to  some  time  in  Novem- 
ber, 1863  ;  commanded  a  brigade  engaged  in  the  defences 
of  Washington  July  10  to  13,  1864,  and  for  energy  and 
good  conduct  in  assisting  to  repel  the  attack  on  Fort 
Slocum,  D.  C,  he  was  brevetted  brigadier-general ;  com- 
manded the  garrison  of  Washington  to  September,  1865  ; 
on  duty  in  the  Bureau  of  Refugees,  Freedmen,  and  Aban- 
doned Lands  in  S.  C.  to  Jan,  4,  1S67;  upon  which  date 
he  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  ser- 
vice. 

"  He  was  appointed  first  lieutenant  Forty-fifth  U.  S.  Inf. 
to  date  from  July  28,  1866,  and  promoted  captain  Feb. 
4,  1868. 

"  He  received  the  brevets  of  captain  'for  gallant  and 
meritorious  services  in  the  second  battle  of  Bull  Run;' 
major  '  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle 
of  South  Mountain,  Maryland  ;'  and  lieutenant-colonel 
'  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of 
Antietam. 

"  He  served  in  the  Bureau  of  Refugees,  Freedmen, 
and  Abandoned  Lands  in  S.  C.  from  Jan.  5,  1867,  to  Oct. 
10,  1868;  and  in  Florida  with  brevet  rank  to  July  15, 
1870;  on  duty  at  head-quarters  Bureau  of  Refugees, 
Freedmen,  and  Abandoned  Lands,  Washington,  until  he 
was  retired  from  active  service,  with  the  full  rank  of 
colonel,  Dec.  15,1 870,  for  disability  resulting  from  wounds 
received  in  line  of  duty,  under  section  32  of  the  act  of 
Congress  approved  July  20,  1S66,  which  authorized  re- 
tirement in  such  cases  with  the  full  rank  of  the  command 


held  by  the  officer  when  the  disabling  wounds  were  re- 
ceived ;  retired  with  the  rank  of  lieutenant-colonel,  the 
actual  rank  in  the  volunteer  service  held  by  him  when 
wounded,  March  3,  1875,  under  the  provisions  of  an 
act  of  Congress  approved  that  date." 

Incidental  to  his  field  service  he  participated  with  his 
regiment  in  the  battles  of  Cedar  Mountain,  three  days  at 
Rappahannock  Station,  Thoroughfare  Gap,  Bull  Run, 
second  Chantilly,  South  Mountain,  and  Antietam.  Was 
in  command  from  and  during  the  battle  of  Bull  Run  to 
Antietam. 

At  the  second  battle  of  Bull  Run,  Major  Gile  com- 
manded the  Eighty-eighth  Penn.  Vol.  This  regiment 
was  one  of  the  four  comprising  Tower's  brigade,  and  of 
the  conduct  of  that  brigade,  General  Pope,  in  his  official 
report,  speaks  as  follows  : 

"  Tower's  brigade,  of  Ricketts's  division,  was  pushed 
forward  into  action  into  support  of  Reynolds's  division, 
led  forward  in  person  by  General  Tower  with  conspicu- 
ous skill  and  gallantry. 

"  The  conduct  of  that  brigade  in  plain  view  of  all  the 
forces  on  our  left  was  especially  distinguished,  and  drew 
forth  heart)-  and  enthusiastic  cheers.  The  example 
of  that  brigade  was  of  great  service  and  infused  new 
spirit  into  all  the  troops  who  witnessed  their  intrepid 
conduct." 

He  was  stationed  in  the  city  of  Washington  from 
November,  1863,  to  close  of  war;  during  this  time  he 
commanded  a  regiment,  brigade,  and  the  garrison  of 
Washington,  which  consisted  of  two  brigades  of  infantry, 
a  battery  of  artillery,  and  a  detachment  of  cavalry. 

He  commanded  President  Lincoln's  second  inaugural 
and  funeral  escort.  Was  general  officer  of  the  day  on 
the  occasion  of  the  final  review  of  the  armies  at  the  close 
of  the  war. 


[68 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


COLONEL   AND   BREVET    MAJOR-GENERAL    QJJINCY 
A.  GILLMORE,  U.S.A.  (deceased). 

Colonel  and  Brevet  Major-General  Quincy  A. 
Gillmore  was  burn  in  Ohio  and  graduated  from  the 
U.  S.  Military  Academy  July  i,  [849.  He  was  pro- 
moted brevet  second  lieutenant  Corps  of  Engineers 
the  same  day;  second  lieutenant  September  5,  1853; 
in  t  lieutenant  July  1,  1S56,  and  captain  August  6,  1861. 
lie  served  on  engineer  duty  in  constructing  Forts  Mon- 
roe and  Calhoun  in  1849-52  ;  was  at  West  Point  attached 
to  company  of  sappers,  miners,  and  pontoniers,  from 
185  2  to  1856;  was  instructor  of  practical  military  engi- 
neering at  West  Point  to  September  15;  treasurer  to 
September  \  1 ,  and  quartermaster  to  September  15,  1856. 
He  was  then  employed  as  assistant  engineer  in  the  con- 
struction <>l  Fort  Monroe,  in  charge  of  the  engineer 
agency  al  New  York  for  supplying  ami  shipping  ma- 
terials for  fortifications  to  1861. 

He  served  during  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  as  chief  en- 
gineer of  the  Port  Royal  Expeditionary  Corps,  1 86 1-62, 
being  present  at  the  descent  upon  Hilton  Head,  South 
Carolina,  November  6,  1861,  and  engaged  in  the  con- 
struction of  fortifications  on  that  island  to  [anuary,  1862; 
then  as  chief  engineer  of  the  siege  of  Fort  Pulaski,  and 
in  command  during  its  bombardment  and  capture,  April 
IO-II,  1862,  being  one  of  the  commissioners  to  arrange 
the  terms  of  capitulation. 

He  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers 
April  28,  1862,  and  was  on  sick-leave  of  ab  enc<  from 
May  to  July  of  that  year.  He  assisted  the  Governor  of 
New  York  in  forwarding  State  troops  until  September 
[2,  1862,  when  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  a 
division  operating  from  Covington,  Kentucky;  of  I  >is- 
trict  of  Wist  Virginia;  of  First  Division,  Army  of  Ken- 
tucky; of  District  of  Central  Kentucky,  and  of  the  United 
States  forces  at  the  battle  of  Somerset,  Kentucky,  from 


September   18,    1862,  to  March   30,  1863.     He  was  ap- 
pointed major-general  of  volunteers  July  10,  1863. 

After  a  short  leave  of  absence,  he  was  placed  in  com- 
mand of  the  Department  of  the  South  and  of  the  Tenth 
Army  Corps,  from  June  12,  [863,  to  June  17,  1864,  being 
engaged  in  command  of  the  operations  against  Charles- 
ton, South  Carolina,  comprising  the  descent  upon 
Morris  Island;  bombardment  and  reduction  of  Fort 
Sumter;  and  siege  and  capitulation  of  Fort  Wagner. 
He  was  then  in  command  of  the  Tenth  Army  Corps  in 
the  operations  on  James  River,  near  Bermuda  Hundred, 
and  engaged  in  actions  of  Swift  Creek,  near  Chester 
Station  ;  assault  and  capture  of  the  right  of  the  enemy's 
intrenchments  in  front  of  Dairy's  Bluff;  battle  of  Drury's 
Bluff;  defence  of  Bermuda  Hundred;  reconnoissance  of 
the  enemy's  lines  before  Petersburg,  and  in  command 
of  two  divisions  of  the  Nineteenth  Corps  in  defence  of 
Washington,  D.  C,  July  1 1,  1864,  and  in  pursuit  of  the 
rebels  under  General  Early  until  July  14,  1864,  when  he 
was  severely  injured  by  the  fall  of  his  horse,  and  was 
granted  sick-leave  of  absence  to  August  21,  1864. 

In  October  and  November,  1S64,  General  Gillmore  was 
president  of  a  board  for  testing  Ames's  wrought-iron 
cannon  ;  and  then  on  a  tour  of  inspection  of  fortifications 
from  Cairo,  Illinois,  to  Pensacola,  Florida,  to  January 
30,  1865,  at  which  time  he  was  assigned  to  the  command 
of  the  Department  of  the  South,  retaining  that  until  the 
following  November.  He  was  brevetted  for  gallant  and 
meritorious  services,  lieutenant-colonel  April  11,  1862,  in 
the  capture  of  Fort  Pulaski,  Georgia;  colonel  March  30, 
1863,  at  the  battle  of  Somerset,  Kentucky;  brigadier- 
general  March  13,  1865,  in  the  capture  of  Fort  Wagner, 
South  Carolina  ;  and  major-general  in  the  assault  on 
Morris  Island,  South  Carolina,  and  the  bombardment  and 
demolition  of  Fort  Sumter.  He  resigned  his  volunteer 
commission  December  5,  1865.  He  was  promoted  major 
of  engineers  June  i,  1863  ;  lieutenant-colonel  January  13, 
1874  ;  and  colonel  February  20,  1883  ;  and  was  employed 
after  the  war  closed  as  assistant  to  the  chief  engineer  of 
the  Third  Division,  Engineer  Bureau  at  Washington  City, 
D.  C,  to  November  8,  1 866  ;  as  member  of  a  special  board 
to  conduct  experiments  in  connection  with  the  use  of 
iron  in  the  construction  of  permanent  fortifications,  and 
member  of  other  boards;  and  was  superintending  en- 
gineer of  the  fortifications  on  Staten  Island,  New  York, 
and  engaged  on  other  important  engineer  duty  until  he 
died  at  Brooklyn,  New  York,  April  7,  1888.  General 
Gillmore  had  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts  conferred  by 
Oberlin  College,  Ohii  >,  1  836,  I  [e  was  the  author  of  a  work 
on  the  "Siege  and  Reduction  of  Fort  Pulaski,  Georgia,  in 
1862;"  of  a  "Practical  Treatise  on  Limes,  Hydraulic 
Cements,  and  Mortars,"  1863;  and  of  "Engineer  and 
Artillery  Operations  against  the  Defences  of  Charleston 
in  1863." 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


169 


REAR-ADMIRAL  LEWIS  M.  GOLDSBOROUGH,  U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Rear-Admiral  Lewis  M.  Goldsborough  was  born 
in  the  city  of  Washington,  in  February,  1805.  As  was 
sometimes  done  in  those  days,  lie  was  appointed  a 
midshipman  when  a  mere  child, — J  Line  18,  18 12.  Of 
course,  he  went  to  school  for  some  time  after,  but, 
by  January,  1S25,  he  attained  the  rank  of  lieutenant. 
He  was  attached  to  the  schooner  "  Porpoise,"  of  the 
Mediterranean  Squadron,  1827-29.  In  1827,  while  first 
lieutenant  of  the  "  Porpoise,"  took  command  of  four 
boats,  with  thirty-five  men  and  officers,  and  retook  an 
English  brig,  the  "  Comet,"  which  was  in  possession  of 
two  hundred  Greek  pirates.  It  was  a  desperate  affair, 
but  successful.  There  were  three  killed  of  the  pirates 
to  one  killed  of  the  boarding-part}-.  The  ward-room 
steward  of  the  "  Porpoise,"  a  mulatto  of  herculean 
strength,  a  volunteer,  killed  eleven  of  the  pirates  with 
his  own  hand.  Lieutenant  John  A.  Carr,  U.S.N.,  long 
since  dead,  killed  the  chief  of  the  pirates,  as  well  as 
several  of  his  band.  At  that  time  no  merchant  vessel, 
unprotected  by  convoy,  could  go  up  the  Greek  Archi- 
pelago; and  the  pirates  once  succeeded  in  capturing 
an  Austrian  man-of-war  brig.  The  action  of  Golds- 
borough  and  his  little  party  had  a  most  salutary  effect, 
and  they  received  thanks  from  several  of  the  Mediter- 
ranean powers.  After  this  Lieutenant  Goldsborough 
made  a  full  cruise  in  the  frigate  "  United  States"  in  the 
Pacific.  He  was  commissioned  commander  in  Sep- 
tember, 1841;  executive-officer  of  the  "Ohio,"  74,  at 
the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz;  commanded  three  hundred 
officers  and  men  of  the  "  Ohio"  at  the  capture  of  Tuxpan  ; 
commanded  the  "  Levant,"  in  the  Mediterranean,  1852-53. 
He  was  superintendent  of  the  Naval  Academy  at  Annap- 
olis— having  been  commissioned  captain  in  1855 — from 
1854  to  1857.  He  commanded  the  flag-ship  "  Congress," 
of  the  Brazil  Squadron,  [859-61.  During  the  joint  ex- 
pedition to  the  North  Carolina  waters,  in  1862,  Flag- 
Officer  Goldsborough  commanded  the  naval  force, — 
being  present  for  duty  far  in  advance  of  the  army.  He- 
had  seventeen  light-draught  vessels,  which  fought  the 
battle  of  Roanoke  Island,  against  the  forts,  the  troops, 
and  the  flotilla,  with  defences,  stationed  there.  On  Feb- 
ruary 5,  1862,  three  columns,  under  the  immediate  com- 
mand of  Commodore  Rowan, — afterwards  vice-admiral, — 
formed  for  action.     On  the  morning  of  the  7th  the  enemy's 


vessels,  eight  in  number,  were  found  behind  an  extensive 
row  of  piles  and  sunken  vessels,  extending  clear  across 
the  Sound.  The  engagement  began  at  10.30  a.m.,  and  at 
4  P.M.  the  batteries  on  the  island  were  silenced  enough  to 
permit  the  landing  of  troops.  By  midnight  over  ten 
thousand  troops  had  disembarked.  On  the  following 
morning  the  army  did  the  fighting,  and  in  the  afternoon 
the  navy  opened  a  passage  through  the  obstructions,  suc- 
cessfully accomplished  by  dark.  On  the  10th  the  remains 
of  the  rebel  fleet  were  captured  in  the  Pasquotank  River 
by  Commodore  Rowan.  On  March  14,  1862,  the  town  of 
New  Berne,  North  Carolina,  was  occupied  by  a  detach- 
ment of  Flag-Officer  Goldsborough's  squadron.  ( )n 
May  10,  1862,  Goldsborough  engaged  and  silenced  the 
batteries  at  Sewell's  Point,  opposite  Fortress  Monroe, 
and  passed  up  to  Norfolk,  which  had  been  evacuated  by 
the  rebels.  He  was  commissioned  as  rear-admiral  in 
July,  1862.  At  the  close  of  the  war  he  was  ordered  to 
command  the  European  Station.  He  returned  home  in 
1868,  and  from  that  time  to  the  date  of  his  death,  in 
February,  1877,  was  on  special  duty  at  Washington. 

Rear-Admiral  Goldsborough  was  a  man  far  beyond 
the  usual  size,  and  of  a  striking  appearance  in  every  way. 
He  was  a  student  all  his  life,  and,  in  addition  to  his  pro- 
ficiency in  professional  matters,  he  was  a  fairly-good 
lawyer  and  an  accomplished  linguist.  He  wrote  very 
well,  and  some  of  his  letters  were  quite  models  of  com- 
position. He  married  a  daughter  of  the  celebrated  William 
Wirt,  and  had  two  children,  a  son  and  a  daughter,  both 
of  whom  he  survived. 


22 


I/O 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR  GRHEN  CLAY  GOODLOE.  U.S.M.C. 

Major  Green  Clay  Goodloe,  paymaster  of  the 
United  States  Marine  Corps,  was  born  at  Castle  Union, 
Madison  County,  Kentucky,  January  31,  1S45,  on  the 
plantation  of  his  grandfather,  Colonel  J.  Speed  Smith,  son 
of  General  1).  S.  Goodloe  and  Sally  Clay  Smith.  Edu- 
-  ated  in  the  classics  and  law  at  Transylvania  University, 
Lexington,  Kentucky.  Belongs  to  a  family  which  has 
maintained  a  leading  place  in  Kentucky  for  generations, 
by  the  distinction  achieved  by  its  members  in  civil  and 
military  positions.  His  ancestors  were  officers  in  the 
patriotic  army  of  the  Revolution.  His  great-grand- 
father, Green  Clay,  served  in  the  wars  of  the  Revolution 
and  181 2.  A  noted  achievement  was  marching  a  force  to 
the  relief  of  General  W.  H.  Harrison,  besieged  by  a  supe- 
rior force  of  British  and  Indians,  at  Fort  Meigs,  on  the 
Maumee.  General  Harrison  placed  him  in  command  of 
three  thousand  men.  His  grandfather,  Colonel  John 
Speed  Smith,  was  aid  to  General  W.  II.  Harrison  in 
the  war  of  1 812  ;  Speaker  of  Kentucky  House  of  Repre- 
sentatives, and  member  of  Congress.  An  uncle  is  the 
veteran  General  Cassius  M.  Clay,  captain  in  the  Mexican 
War;  wounded  and  taken  prisoner;  pioneer  in  abolishing 
slavery;  a  major-general  in  the  army  of  the  United 
States;  minister  to  Russia.  Another  uncle  is  Major- 
General  Green  Clay  Smith,  United  States  Volunteers, 
shot  in  the  knee  in  cavalry  charge  at  1  .ebanon,  Tennessee  ; 
veteran  of  Mexican  War;  lieutenant;  member  of  Con- 
gress ;  governor.  When  the  war  became  imminent,  his 
family  threw  their  powerful  influence  on  the  side  of  the 
Union,  and  no  one  thing  did  more  to  hold  the  State, 
which  wavered,  true  to  her  allegiance.  Major  Goodloe, 
then  a  boy  of  sixteen,  actuated  by  the  soldiery  traditions 
of  lus  family,  was  then  a  member  of  the  Lexington 
Chasseurs,  which  was  loyal  to  the  flag.      Major  Goodloe 


was  a  marker  in  the  company,  and  carried  the  United 
States  flag  the  last  time  it  appeared  in  a  parade  of  the 
Old  Kentucky  State  Guard.  He  was  ordered  by  Colonel 
R.  W.  Hanson,  the  colonel  in  command,  to  take  it  to  the 
armon-,  and  this  precipitated  the  dissension  which  drew 
a  sharp  line  between  the  Union  and  secession  portion 
of  the  Guard,  and  broke  it  up.  Major  Goodloe,  with  the 
rest  of  his  family,  became  active  on  the  side  of  the  Union, 
and  he,  with  one  other  and  a  brother,  were  the  first  to 
arrive,  armed  with  muskets,  at  depot,  in  Lexington,  when 
it  seemed  inevitable  that  a  fight  must  be  made  to  secure 
for  the  troops  the  arms  which  had  been  sent  them  by  the 
government.  He  joined  the  Fourth  Kentucky  Cavalry 
Regiment,  which  he  reached  at  Wartrace,  Tennessee,  as  it 
stood  in  line  of  battle  to  receive  the  attack  of  the  enemy. 
He  was  in  ten  cavalry  battles  and  skirmishes  during  his 
service.  For  his  gallant  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Lebanon, 
Tennessee,  General  Dumont  recommended  his  promotion, 
while  still  on  the  held,  to  first  lieutenant.  When  pro- 
moted he  was  assigned  to  Company  I,  Twenty-third 
Kentucky  Infantry,  and  detailed  as  aide-de-camp  on  the 
staff  of  General  Green  Clay  Smith,  lie  served  in  this 
capacity  on  brigade  and  division  staffs  during  the  cam- 
paign through  Kentucky  and  Tennessee,  participating 
in  many  engagements.  At  the  cavalry  battle  of  Little 
Harpeth,  Forrest's  men  completely  surrounded  and  cut 
him  off,  but  he  broke  through  them.  Johnson's  report 
says,  "  Lieutenant  Clay  Goodloe,  of  General  Smith's 
staff,  in  returning  from  delivering  an  order,  found  himself 
surrounded  by  rebels,  and  had  to  run  the  gauntlet. 
After  emptying  his  holster  pistols,  he  laid  flat  on  his 
horse,  relying  upon  his  spurs  and  his  '  Lexington.'  They 
brought  him  safely  home,  but  he  has  a  bullet-hole 
through  his  pants  to  remind  him  of  the  amiable  inten- 
tions of  his  Southern  brethren  respecting  himself."  In 
the  thorough  rout  of  Morgan's  cavalry  command,  on 
May  4,  1862,  at  Lebanon,  Tennessee,  Surgeon  Adams 
reported,  "  Clay  Goodloe  kept  in  line  with  Colonel 
Smith,  and  was  grazed  on  the  third  joint[of  the  second 
finger  by  a  bullet.  He  attempted  to  hold  poor  Pierce- 
field  on  his  horse  after  he  received  his  fatal  shot.  He 
is  a  gallant  and  noble  boy,  yet  beardless,  but  has  the 
courage  of  .1  veteran."  Every  official  report  contained 
flattering  mention  of  him. 

In  September,  1863,  appointed  cadet  at  West  Point, 
but  resigned  in  1865  ;  commissioned  second  lieutenant, 
United  States  Marine  Corps  April  21,  1869;  promoted 
tirst  lieutenant  January  12,  1S76;  and  made  paymaster 
March  17,  1877.  Married  April  17,  1877,  Miss  Bettie 
Reck,  daughter  of  United  States  Senator  James  Burnie 
Beck  and  Jane  Washington  Thornton.  Mrs.  Goodloe, 
his  wife,  is  a  i;reat-great-great-riiece  of  General  George- 
Washington,  being  related  on  both  sides  of  her  mother 
to  the  Father  of  our  Country. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


171 


LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER  H.  H.  GORRINGE.  U.S.N. 
(deceased). 

Lieutenant  -  Commander    H.    H.   Gorringe   was   a 

native  of  the  West  Indies,  but  was  appointed  a  master's 
mate  in  the  U.  S.  naval  service  from  the  State  of  New 
York  on  October  1,  1862.  He  was  sent  out  to  the  Mis- 
sissippi at  once,  and  remained  there  during  the  whole  of 
the  Civil  War.  Owing  to  his  courage,  seamanship,  and 
devotion  to  duty  he  obtained  remarkable  advancement. 
Three  of  his  promotions  were  for  gallantry  in  battle. 
He  was  made  acting  ensign  in  1863,  promoted  to  acting 
master  in  1864,  and  to  acting  volunteer  lieutenant  in 
1865. 

Lieutenant-Commander  Gorringe  took  part  in  nearly 
all  the  important  battles  of  the  Mississippi  Squadron. 
He  was  promoted  to  be  acting  volunteer  lieutenant- 
commander  Jul)-  10,  1865. 

In  [867  he  commanded  the  steamer  "  Memphis,"  of 
the  Atlantic  Squadron,  and  on  December  18,  1S68,  he 
was  commissioned  lieutenant-commander  in  the  regular 
navy.  He  was  attached  to  the  navy-yard  at  New  York 
during  1868,  and  then  made  a  three  years'  cruise  in  the 
sloop-of-war  "Portsmouth,"  of  the  South  Atlantic  Squad- 
ron, 1869-71.  From  1872  to  1876  he  was  attached  to 
the  hydrographic  office  at  Washington,  and  then  com- 
manded the  "  Gettysburg"  (fourth  rate),  on  special  service 
in  the  Mediterranean,  from  1S76  to  1879. 

In  1880  he  was  upon  leave  of  absence,  and  was  employed 
in  conveying  the  Egyptian  obelisk,  now  in  Central  Park-, 
in  New  York,  from  Alexandria,  Egypt,  to  its  destination. 


A  steamer,  called  the  "  Dessoug,"  was  purchased  for  this 
purpose,  and  the  ingenious  and  seaman-like  manner  in 
which  he  placed  the  huge  monolith  securely  in  her  hold, 
and  the  safety  with  which  he  transported  it,  secured 
general  admiration  and  approval. 

After  this  he  was  engaged  in  a  ship-building  operation 
in  Philadelphia,  having  been  granted  leave  of  absence  for 
that  purpose.     He  died  in  1883. 

Lieutenant-Commander  Gorringe  suffered  much  from 
a  wound  of  the  leg,  received  during  the  war,  which  never 
closed.  This,  with  malarial  troubles  due  to  his  long  and 
continuous  service  in  the  Mississippi,  no  doubt  hastened 
his  death. 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


ASSISTANT  SECRETARY  OE  WAR  LEWIS  A.  GRANT. 

Assistant  Secretary  of  War  Lewis  A.  Grant  was 
mustered  into  the  service  of  the  United  States  September 
16,  1861,  at  St.  Albans,  Vermont,  as  major  with  the  field 
and  staff,  Fifth  Vermont  Infantry  Volunteers,  to  serve  for 
three  years  ;  was  mustered  in  as  lieutenant-colonel,  same 
regiment,  to  date  September  25,  [861  ;  as  colonel,  same 
regiment,  to  elate  September  16,  1862.  The  regiment 
was  assigned  to  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  partici- 
pated in  the  advance  of  that  army  in  the  spring  of  1862. 
During  his  service  with  the  Fifth  Vermont  Infantry  Vol- 
unteers, that  regiment  took  part  in  the  following  battles: 
Yorktown,  Virginia,  April  4  and  May  4,  1862;  Williams- 
burg, Virginia,  May  5,  [862;  Golding's  Farm,  Virginia, 
June  28,  [862  ;  Savage  Station,  Virginia,  June  29,  [862  ; 
White  Oak  Swamp,  Virginia,  June  30,  1862  ;  Crampton's 
Gap,  Maryland,  September  14,  1862;  Antietam,  Mary- 
land, September  17,  1862,  and  Fredericksburg,  Virginia, 
December  13-14,   1862. 

He  was  honorably  discharged  as  colonel  to  date  May 
20,  1864,  to  enable  him  to  accept  an  appointment  as 
brigadier-general  of  volunteers,  lie  was  appointed  brig- 
adier-general U.  S.  Volunteers  April  27,  [864;  accepted 
appi  lintment  May  2 1 ,  1864. 

He  commanded  the  Second  Brigade,  Second  Division, 
Sixth  Army  Corps,  from   February  21,  1863,  to  Decern 
ber  29,   1863;   from   February  2,  1S64,  to  September  29, 
1S64,  and   from   October  8,  1864,  to   December  2,  1864; 


the  Second  Division,  Sixth  Corps,  from  December  2, 
[864,  to  February  11,  1 865  ,  the  Second  Brigade,  same 
division,  from  February  11,  1865,  to  February  20,  1865, 
and  from  March  7,  1865,  to  June  28,  1865. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  the  battles  in  which  he  par- 
ticipated as  a  brigade  or  division  commander :  Freder- 
icksburg and  Salem  Heights,  Virginia,  May  3  to  5,  1863  ; 
Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania,  July  2  and  3,  1863;  Fairfield, 
Pennsylvania,  July  5,  1863;  Rappahannock  Station,  Vir- 
ginia, November  8,  1863;  Mine  Run,  Virginia,  Novem- 
ber 27,  1863;  Wilderness,  Virginia,  May  5  to  7,  1864; 
Spottsylvania  Court-House,  Virginia,  May  8  to  21,  1S64; 
Cold  Harbor,  Virginia,  June  I  to  12,  1S64;  siege  of 
Petersburg,  Virginia,  June  18  to  July  10,  1864;  Charles- 
town,  Virginia,  August  21,  1864;  Gilbert's  Crossing, 
Virginia,  September  13,  1864;  siege  of  Petersburg.  Vir- 
ginia, December,  1864,  to  April,  1865  ;  assault  on  Peters- 
burg, Virginia,  April  2.  1865  ;  Sailor's  Creek,  April  6, 1S65. 

At  the  close  of  the  war  General  Grant  was  hon- 
ored with  the  commission  of  brevet  major-general  U.  S. 
Volunteers,  to  date  from  October  19,  1864,  "for  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  in  the  present  campaign  before 
Richmond,  Virginia,  and  in  the  Shenandoah  Valley;" 
ami  was  honorably  discharged  the  service  .August  24, 
1805,  Under  the  provisions  of  the  act  of  Congress  ap- 
proved June  3,  1884,  and  the  acts  amendatory  thereof,  he 
is  considered  as  commissioned  to  the  grade  of  major 
Fifth  Vermont  Volunteers,  to  take  effect  from  September 
7,  1 861,  to  fill  an  original  vacancy. 

He  was  recommended  August  22,  1866,  by  General 
U.  S.  Grant,  commanding  the  army  of  the  United  States, 
for  appointment  as  a  field-officer  in  the  regular  army  ; 
was  appointed  August  29,  1866,  lieutenant-colonel  Thirty- 
sixth  Regiment  U.  S.  Infantry,  to  date  from  July  28,  1866, 
and  declined  the  appointment  November  6,  1S66. 

General  Grant's  field  services  were  with  or  in  command 
of  the  celebrated  Vermont  brigade  whose  fighting  quali- 
ties were  so  well  known  in  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
and  whose  soldierly  dependence  was  of  such  character 
that  it  was  transferred,  with  the  regular  division  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  in  August,  1863,  to  New  York- 
City,  to  assist  in  quelling  the  riots  occasioned  there  by 
the  draft  for  men.  As  soon  as  this  duty  was  completed, 
the  troops  were,  in  the  fall  of  the  same  year,  retransferred 
to  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac. 

General  Grant  was  appointed  Assistant  Secretary  of 
War  in  I  S90,  which  office  he  now  holds. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


173 


GENERAL  ULYSSES  S.  GRANT,  U.S.A.  (deceased). 

General  Ulysses  S.  Grant  was  born  at  Point  Pleas- 
ant, Clermont  County,  Ohio,  April  27, 1 822,  and  graduated 
at  the  Military  Academy  July  I,  1843.  He  was  promoted 
brevet  second  lieutenant  of  the  Fourth  Infantry  the  same 
day,  and  second  lieutenant  Fourth  Infantry  September  30, 
1845.  He  served  first  at  Jefferson  Barracks,  and  then 
on  frontier  duty  at  Natchitoches  (Camp  Salubrity)  in 
1844-45,  and  then  took  part  in  the  military  occupation 
of  Texas  and  the  war  with  Mexico,  being  engaged  in  the 
battles  of  Palo  Alto,  Resaca  de  la  Palma,  Monterey,  siege 
of  Vera  Cruz,  battle  of  Cerro  Gordo,  capture  of  San 
Antonio,  battle  of  Churubusco,  battle  of  Molino  del  Rey, 
storming  of  Chapultepec,  and  assault  and  capture  of  the 
City  of  Mexico.  He  was  regimental  quartermaster  of 
the  Fourth  Infantry  from  April  1,  1847,  to  Jul)-  23, 
1848,  and  again  from  September  n,  1849,  to  September 
30,  1853. 

He  moved  with  his  regiment  to  the  Pacific  coast  in 
1852,  and  was  at  several  different  stations.  He  was  pro- 
moted captain   August   5,    1853,  but   resigned   Jul)'  31, 

1854 

Upon  leaving  the  army  Captain  Grant  retired  to  private 
life,  and  engaged  in  farming  near  St.  Louis,  Missouri. 
Then  he  became  a  real  estate  agent  at  St.  Louis  until 
i860,  and  subsequently  a  merchant  at  Galena,  Ohio, 
where  he  resided  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion. 

Entering  the  volunteer  service  he  was  in  command 
of  a  company  in  April  and  May,  and  assisting  in  organ- 
izing and  mustering  volunteers  into  service  until  June 
17,  1 861,  when  he  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Twenty- 
first  Illinois  Infantry.  His  first  active  service  was  to 
march  on  Quincy,  Illinois,  and  then  guarding  the  Han- 
nibal and  St.  Joe  Railroad.  He  was  placed  in  com- 
mand, first  at  Ironton,  then  at  Jefferson  City,  and  finally 
of  the  District  of  Southwestern  Missouri,  with  head- 
quarters at  Cape  Girardeau.  This  command  was  subse- 
quently extended  to  embrace  Southern  Illinois  and 
Western  Kentucky.  He  had,  in  the  mean  time,  been 
appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers  May  17, 
1 861. 

General  Grant  commenced  his  operations  by  first 
seizing  Paducah,  Kentucky ;  then  Belmont,  and  then 
invested  and  captured  Fort  Donelson,  with  fourteen 
thousand  six  hundred  and  twenty-three  prisoners,  and 
much  material  of  war.  This  being  the  first  real  Union 
success  of  the  war  placed  General  Grant  before  the  people 
of  the  country  at  large  as  a  rising  soldier  ;  but  many  old 
officers  who  had  known  him  in  the  regular  service 
doubted  his  ability,  and  attributed  his  success  on  this 
occasion  to  "  luck."  He  was,  however,  duly  recognized, 
and  the  appointment  of  major-general  of  volunteers  was 
conferred  upon  him,  to  date  from  February  16,  1862. 


It  would  be  impossible,  in  this  limited  sketch,  to 
enumerate  the  campaigns,  battles,  and  actions  in  which 
this  illustrious  general  participated.  He  followed  up  his 
movements  to  Shiloh,  then  was  placed  in  command  of 
the  District  of  West  Tennessee,  and  was  in  immediate 
command  of  the  right  wing  of  General  Halleck's  army, 
and  directed  the  operations  about  Corinth,  the  Hatchie, 
and  Iuka.  He  was  in  command  of  the  Army  of  the 
Mississippi,  in  the  Vicksburg  campaign,  in  all  its  various 
manoeuvres,  until  he  again  electrified  the  country  by 
the  capture  of  the  city  of  Vicksburg,  July  4,  1863,  with 
stores  and  garrison  of  thirty-one  thousand  five  hundred 
men.  For  this  brilliant  affair  he  was  made  major-general 
of  the  U.  S.  Army. 

General  Grant  was,  on  the  1 6th  of  October,  1863, 
placed  in  command  of  the  Military  Division  of  the 
Mississippi,  including  the  Armies  of  the  Ohio,  Cum- 
berland, and  Tennessee,  and  continued  his  operations 
up  to  the  battle  of  Chattanooga,  for  which  he  received 
the  thanks  of  Congress  December  17,  1863,  and  a  gold 
medal. 

On  March  17,  1864,  he  was  placed  in  command  as 
general-in-chief  of  the  armies  of  the  United  States,  and 
was  called  to  the  East  to  supervise  the  operations  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  and  commenced  in  the  May  fol- 
lowing that  celebrated  campaign  on  the  line  which  ter- 
minated on  the  9th  of  April,  1865,  in  the  surrender  of 
the  Army  of  Northern  Virginia,  under  General  Robert  E. 
Lee. 

He  was  by  act  of  Congress  made  general  of  the  U.  S. 
Army  July  25,  1866;  but  resigned  this  commission  on 
March  4,  1869,  having  been  elected  President  of  the 
United  States,  and  on  that  day  was  inaugurated  as  such. 
After  holding  this  office  for  eight  years,  General  Grant 
retired  to  private  life,  and  died  at  Mt.  McGregor,  near 
Saratoga,  N.Y.,  July  23,  1885. 


174 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL   ADOLPHUS  W.   GREELY, 

U.S.A. 

Brigadier-General  Adolphus  W.  Greei.v  (Chief 
Signal-officer)  was  born  in  Massachusetts.  He  entered 
the  volunteer  service  in  the  early  part  of  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  as  private  of  Company  B,  Nineteenth  Massa- 
chusetts Infantry,  July  26,  1861.  lie  was  afterwards 
promoted  corporal  and  first  sergeant  of  the  same  corn- 
pan)-,  and  served  to  March  18,  1863,  in  the  field  with  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  participating  in  the  Peninsula 
campaign,  and  was  engaged  at  the  siege  of  Yorktown, 
action  of  West  Point,  battles  of  Fair  Oaks,  Peach  Or- 
chard, Savage  Station,  White  <  fak  Swamp,  where  he  was 
wounded,  and  the  battle  "I  Malvern  Hill,  Virginia,  in 
1862.  He  participated  in  the  Maryland  campaign,  and 
was  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Antietam,  where  he  was 
again  wounded.  Pie  also  participated  in  the  Rappahan- 
nock campaign,  and  was  engaged  at  the  battle  of  Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia,  in  1862. 

On  the  [8th  of  March,  [863,  he  was  appointed  second 
lieutenant  of  the  Eighty-first  United  States  Colored 
Infantry,  promoted  first  lieutenant  April  26,  1864,  and 
captain  April  4,  1S65.  With  this  regiment  Lieutenant 
finely  served  in  the  field  with  the  Army  of  the  South- 
west, and  was  engaged   in   the  siege'  of  Port    Hudson, 


Louisiana.  At  the  close  of  the  war  he  was  ordered  on 
recruiting  duty,  and  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the 
volunteer  service  March  22,  1S67,  having  been  appointed 
second  lieutenant  of  the  Thirty-sixth  United  States  In- 
fantry March  7,  1867.  On  the  consolidation  of  regi- 
ments, in  1  869,  Lieutenant  Greely  was  unassigned,  but  on 
the  14th  of  July,  of  that  year,  he  was  assigned  to  the 
Fifth  Cavalry.  He  was  brevetted  major  of  volunteers 
for  faithful  and  meritorious  services  during  the  war. 

After  joining  the  Fifth  Cavalry  he  was  on  frontier  duty 
in  the  West  to  1 869 ;  on  staff  duty  at  Omaha  to  1871  ; 
was  assigned  to  duty  in  the  office  of  the  chief  signal- 
officer  of  the  army,  where  he  served  until  lune,  1881, 
and  was  employed  as  a  station  inspector,  as  superintend- 
ent of  the  construction  of  military  telegraph  lines  in 
Texas,  and  as  a  general  assistant  in  the  Washington 
office. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  May  27,  1875,  and 
captain  June  1 1,  1886. 

He  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  the  Arctic  expe- 
dition of  1880,  but  the  order  was  subsequently  revoked, 
because  of  an  unfavorable  report  made  by  a  board  of 
naval  officers  upon  the  vessel  which  had  been  selected 
for  the  service.  The  Lady  Franklin  Bay  expedition  was 
then  organized  during  the  spring  and  summer  of  1881, 
and  in  July  he  sailed  from  St.  John's,  Newfoundland, 
in  command,  with  the  intention  of  remaining  absent  for 
two  years.  The  object  of  the  expedition  was  to  establish 
a  supply  and  meteorological  station  at  Lady  Franklin 
Bay  and  make  explorations  northward  from  that  place. 
Lieutenant  Greely  was  for  six  years  a  student  of  Arctic 
explorations,  and  his  experiences  of  twelve  years  in  the 
signal  service  in  the  army,  particularly  in  compiling  ob- 
servations and  forecasting  the  daily  weather  reports, 
were  such  as  to  qualify  him  for  the  scientific  part  of  the 
work  ;  the  results  of  his  researches  have  added  valuable 
information  to  the  subject  of  Arctic  explorations,  although 
his  expedition  met  with  the  misfortune  of  being  ship- 
wrecked, and  the  entire  party  reduced  to  a  state  of  star- 
vation before  the  remnants  of  it  were  discovered  by  a 
naval  expedition  sent  to  their  relief. 

On  the  3d  of  March,  1887,  Captain  Greely  was  ap- 
pointed brigadier-general  and  chief  signal-officer,  and 
since  that  time  has  been  on  duty  at  Washington,  D.  C. 


WHO   SERVED   1 TV  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


'75 


COMMANDER  JAMES  G.  GRF.F.N,  U.S.N. 

Commander  James  G.  Green  was  a  native  of  Massa- 
chusetts, and  entered  the  navy  as  master's  mate  May  18, 
1861.  He  served  in  the  U.S.  S.  "Mississippi"  until 
November  27,  1862, — passing  the  forts  at  New  Or- 
leans. 

He  was  promoted  to  acting  ensign  November  27,  1862, 
and  transferred  to  U.  S.  S.  "  Katahdin,"  and  served  in 
that  vessel  on  the  blockade  off  Galveston  until  December, 
1863. 

He  was  ordered  to  U.  S.  S.  "  Wyalusing"  in  1864,  and 
served  in  the  sounds  of  North  Carolina  and  in  the  fight 
with  the  ram  "  Albemarle." 

Promoted  to  acting  master  August  1  1,  1864,  and  was 
ordered  to  command  the  torpedo  tug  "  Belle,"  serving  on 
that  vessel  in  the  North  Carolina  sounds  until  the  close 
of  the  war,  being  present  at  the  final  capture  of  Plymouth. 
Afterwards  he  was  attached  to  the  "  New  Hampshire," 
"  Don,"  "  Osceola,"  "  Vermont,"  and  "  Constellation."  "Huron,"    and,    later,    transferred    them    to    the    Naval 

Having    been    transferred    to  the    regular    service,  as  '  Cemetery,  Annapolis. 
master,  March  12,  1868,  he   served  on  the  Asiatic  Sta-         He  was  attached  to  the  "  Palos,"  Asiatic  Station,  1878 
tion,  in  the  "Aroostook"  and  "  Ashuelot,"  from  1868  to     to  1S81. 
1 87 1.  At  the  hydrographic  office,  Washington,  D.  C,  from 

On  December  18,  1868,  he  was  promoted  to  lieutenant,  I  1SS1  to  1883. 
and  to  lieutenant-commander  July  3,  1870.  He  was   on   the  "Galena"   from    1883   to    1886;    and 

He  was  attached  to  the  receiving-ship  "Ohio"  from     promoted  to  commander  March  6,  1887. 
1871   to    1S73,  and  to  the  Asiatic  Station   from    1873  to  ,       He  commanded  the  "  Alert"  from    1888  to    1889,  and 
1876.  the  "Adams"  in  1890. 

While  attached  to  the  navy-yard  at   Norfolk   he  was         He  was  light-house  inspector,  Sixth  District,  from  1890 
sent  to  recover  the  dead  washed  ashore  from  the  U.  S.  S.  I  to  1892. 


t;6 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


CAPTAIN  GEORGE  GORDON  GREENOUGH.  U.S.A. 

Captain  George  Gordon  Greenough  (Fourth  Artil- 
lery) comes  of  one  of  the  oldest  Boston  families,  and  is 
descended  from  the  ducal  family  of  the  Scottish  clan 
Gordon.  In  one  line  he  descends  from  the  English  Co- 
lonial Governor  Treat,  of  Connecticut.  His  grand-uncle, 
Major  Samuel  Treat,  was  killed  at  Fort  Mifflin,  in  the 
Revolutionary  War.  From  his  mother  he  is  connected 
with  Judge  Cushing,  of  the  U.  S.  Supreme  Court,  and 
with  General  Lincoln,  of  Revolutionary  fame,  and  of  the 
Burrs,  of  Massachusetts,  of  which  Aaron  Burr  was  a 
member. 

Captain  Greenough  was  born  at  Washington,  D.  C, 
December  8,  [844,  and  at  eleven  years  old  was  placed  at 
a  French  school  in  Paris,  where  he  received  his  early 
education.  In  his  sixteenth  year  he  returned  home  and 
entered  the  West  Point  .Military  Academy  June  1, 
1 861. 

During  his  furlough  year  he  had  a  great  desire  to  see 
real  active  service  with  the  army,  which  was  strength- 
ened by  the  invasion  of  the  Confederates  north  of  the 
Potomac,  and  hastening  to  the  front  he  was  placed  upon 
the  staff  of  Major-General  W.  H.  French,  commanding 
the  Third  Army  Corps,  in  the  extreme  advance,  and  was 
sent  forward  with  Colonel  Julius  Hayden,  inspector- 
general  Third  Army  Corps,  to  the  front  line  of  skir- 
mishing on  a  tour  of  observation  at  Falling  Waters,  Vir- 
ginia, on  the  slope  near  the  river,  where  they  were  under 
a  heavy  artillery  fire  from  the  opposite  bank.  He  re- 
mained with  the  army  on  General  French's  staff  as  long 
as  his  furlough  permitted. 

General  French  in  his  report  of  the  actions  of  Wapping 
Height  and  Manassas  Gap,  July  23,  1863,  says,  "I  would 
also  mention  Cadet  Greenough  acting  aide-de-camp,  who 
conveyed  my  orders  with  precision,  and  exhibited  great 
coolness  under  fire." 


Cadet  Greenough  graduated  from  the  U.  S.  Military 
Academy  June,  1865  ;  was  commissioned  second  lieu- 
tenant on  the  23d  in  the  Twelfth  Infantry,  his  commission 
as  first  lieutenant  is  dated  the  23d  of  June,  1865,  and  he 
was  appointed  acting  regimental  adjutant  of  the  Twelfth 
at  Washington,  1865-66.  In  September,  1866,  he  was 
transferred  to  the  Twenty-first  Infantry  and  was  stationed 
at  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  in  command  of  Company  G. 
Lieutenant  Greenough  left  the  post  July,  1868,  to  report 
for  duty  as  instructor  at  West  Point. 

On  the  15th  of  December,  1870,  Lieutenant  Greenough 
was  assigned  to  the  Fourth  Artillery,  and  early  in  1873 
he  joined  Battery  G  at  Black  Point,  California,  with  which 
he  served  in  the  field  through  the  Modoc  war.  During 
the  time  the  troops  were  in  the  Black  Lava,  near  the 
Indians,  Lieutenant  Greenough  went  to  his  battalion  com- 
mander, Colonel  Mendenhall,  and  offered  to  take  Battery 
G  into  the  Black  Lava  at  night,  and  attack  the  Indian 
camp  early  in  the  morning;  his  idea  was  that  the  re- 
mainder of  the  troops  should  be  moved  up  in  readiness 
to  attack  from  different  points  as  soon  as  the  firing 
began.  Later  he  volunteered  to  carry  despatches  alone, 
or  with  an  escort  of  two  men,  through  the  Lava  Beds; 
he  was  not  permitted  to  carry  out  either  of  these  projects 
on  account  of  the  extreme  danger. 

At  the  close  of  the  Modoc  war  he  was  detailed  with 
Captain  Hasbrook  to  convey  the  Modoc  prisoners  to 
Camp  McPherson,  Nevada,  in  October,  1873.  Subse- 
quently he  commanded  Battery  K,  Fourth  Artillery,  in 
the  Powder  River  winter  campaign  against  the  Sioux  and 
Cheyenne  Indians  with  General  Crook. 

On  the  5th  of  September,  1875,  he  started  for  the 
field  in  the  campaign  against  the  Shoshones,  his  pla- 
toon with  two  field-pieces,  as  artillery,  the  rest  as  cav- 
alry, and  rendezvoused  in  Eastern  Nevada,  stopped  the 
rising  without  fighting,  and  returned  to  the  Presidio  on 
the  4th  of  October. 

He  was  detailed  Ma)'  7,  1877,  as  professor  of  military 
science  at  the  University  of  California,  at  Berkeley.  In 
1879  he  went  to  Fort  Canby.  Then  he  went  to  Fort 
Monroe,  Virginia,  until  May  1,  1882,  and  then  went  to 
Fort  Adams. 

On  December  1,  [883,  he  was  commissioned  captain 
Fourth  Artillery,  and  stationed  at  Fort  Adams,  Rhode 
Island,  and  Fort  Warren,  Massachusetts,  from  whence 
he  joined  the  head-quarters  of  his  regiment  at  Fort 
McPherson,  Georgia,  May  29,  1889. 

Captain  Greenough  has  made  several  important  inven- 
tions, among  which  may  be  mentioned  a  reloading  ap- 
paratus for  reloading  shells  ;  a  field  gun-carriage,  and  a 
very  complete  range-finder  for  sea-coast  defences,  by 
which  several  vessels  may  be  followed  at  once  without 
confusion  or  delay.  He  has  written  on  several  impor- 
tant professional  questions.- 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


^77 


REAR-ADMIRAL  JAMES  A.  GREER.  U.S.N. 

Rear-Admiral  James  A.  Greek  was  born  in  Ohio 
February  28,  1833,  and  appointed  midshipman  from  that 
State  January  10,  1848.  He  served  in  the  "Saratoga" 
and  "  Saranac"  of  the  I  lome  Squadron  up  to  1 850  ;  sloop- 
of-war  "St.  Mary's,"  Pacific  Squadron,  1850-52;  frigate 
"Columbia,"  Home  Squadron,  1853.  Then  went  to  the 
U.S.  Naval  Academy  for  the  usual  courseof  stud)-.  Passed 
midshipman  June  15, 1854;  served  in  the  razee  "  Indepen- 
dence," in  the  Pacific,  1854-57  ;  promoted  to  master  Sep- 
tember 15,  1855  ;  commissioned  as  lieutenant  September 
16,  1 855.  After  serving  at  the  navy-yard  at  Norfolk  made 
the  Paraguay  Expedition  in  the"  Southern  Star,"  1858-59; 
steamers  "  Sumter"  and  "  San  Jacinto,"  coast  of  Africa, 
1859-61  ;  on  return,  assisted  in  the  removal  of  Mason 
and  Slidell  from  the  English  mail-steamer  "  Trent  ;" 
lieutenant-commander  July  16,  1862;  sloop  "St.  Louis," 
special  service,  1862-63;  Mississippi  Squadron,  1863-65  ; 
commanded  steamers  "  Carondelet"  and  "  Benton,"  and  a 
division  of  Admiral  Porter's  fleet;  was  at  the  passage  of 
Vicksburg  April  16,  1863;  fought  the  batteries  of  Grand 
Gulf  for  five  hours  April  29,  1863, — an  incident  of  this 
action  was  the  killing  and  wounding  of  twenty-two  per- 
sons on  board  the  "  Benton"  by  one  projectile  ;  in  the  Red 
River  Expedition  in  May,  1863;  was  engaged  in  the 
combined  attack-  on  Vicksburg  May  22,  1863,  and  was 
almost  constantly  under  fire  during  the  forty-five  days  of 
the  siege  of  Vicksburg.  Lieutenant  Greer  was  engaged 
in  the  Red  River  Expedition  during  March  and  April, 
1864,  and  frequently  engaged  with  small  bodies  of  Con- 
federate troops  and  guerillas.  In  August  and  Septem- 
ber, 1864,  he  was  sent  to  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  to  inquire  into 
and  correct  abuses  which  existed  at  the  Naval  Recruit- 
ing Station  at  that  place.  He  was  then  in  command  of 
the  naval  station  at  Mound  City,  Illinois,  being  trans- 
ferred thence  to  the'  command  of  the  flag-ship  "  Black 
Hawk."  During  this  time  he  was  charged  by  Admiral 
Lee  with  the  selecting,  purchasing,  and  contracting  for 
the  conversion  into  gun-boats  of  ten  river  steamers  ;  also 
had  charge  of  the  convoying  of  army  transports  from 
Johnsonville  up  the  Tennessee  River. 

During  a  portion  of  1865  and  [866  was  stationed  at 
the  Naval  Academy,  Annapolis,  and  commissioned  as 
commander  in  July  of  the  latter  year.  Commanded 
steamer  "  Mohongo,"  North  Pacific  Squadron,  1866-67. 
Dining  his  command  of  "Mohongo,"  he  remained  four 
months  at  Acapulco,  Mexico,   to  protect  American   in- 


terests, which  were  endangered  by  the  convulsion  upon 
the  fall  of  Maximilian  ;  the  State  Department  commended 
him  for  his  course  there. 

He  commanded  the  "  Tuscarora,"  North  Pacific  Squad- 
ron, 1868;  on  ordnance  duty,  Philadelphia  Navy- Yard, 
1868-69  ;  Naval  Academy,  1869-73.  In  1873  com- 
manded purchased  steamer  "  Tigress"  on  the  "  Polaris" 
Relief  Expedition.  In  one  month  after  sailing  from  New 
York  found  the  wreck  of  "  Polaris"  at  Littleton  Island, 
latitude  780  23',  North  Greenland.  Cruised  in  search  of 
the  people,  who  had  left  in  their  boats,  without  success,  in 
Baffin's  Bay  and  Davis's  Straits,  until  October  8,  when  it 
was  deemed  expedient  to  return. 

He  was  upon  the  Board  of  Inspection  in  1874-75  ;  com- 
manding "  Lackawanna,"  Pacific  Station,  1875-77  ;  com- 
missioned captain  April  26,  1876;  commanding  training 
frigate  "  Constitution,"  1S77.  In  1878  commanded  sloop 
"  Constellation,"  which  took  exhibits  to  France  for  the 
Paris  Exposition  ;  commanded  steamer"  Hartford,"  South 
Atlantic,  in  1879;  Board  of  Inspection,  1880-82;  navy- 
yard,  Washington,  1882-84;  president  of  Naval  Exam- 
ining and  Retiring  Boards,  1885-87;  commissioned  as 
commodore,  May  19,  1886  ;  as  acting  rear-admiral,  com- 
manded the  European  Station,  1887-89;  president  of 
Board  on  Organization,  Tactics,  and  Drills,  1889;  presi- 
dent of  Examining  and  Retiring  Boards,  1S90;  member 
of  the  Board  of  Visitors  of  the  Naval  Academy,  1891  ; 
chairman  of  the  Light-House  Board,  and  now  serving  as 
such;  April  3,  1892,  commissioned  as  rear-admiral. 


23 


i78 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR   STEPHEN  W.  GROESBECK,  U.S.A. 

Major  Stephen  W.  Groesbeck  (Sixth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Albany,  New  York,  November  26,  1S40.  At  the 
breaking  out  of  the  Rebellion  he  was  teaching  school 
in  fowa.  Encouraged  by  his  uncle,  Stephen  Walley,  of 
Williamstown,  Massachusetts,  he  had  prepared  himself 
tn  enter  Williams  College,  but,  like  many  young  men  of 
the  period,  he  chose  reluctantly  to  forego  the  advantages 
of  school  to  enter  the  service.  He  enlisted  as  a  private 
in  the  Fourth  Iowa  Cavalry  on  October  28,  1861  ;  was 
mustered  in  as  company  quartermaster-sergeant,  and  in 
'  h  tober,  1862,  promoted  to  second  lieutenant.  <  In  the  7th 
day  of  the  following  month  he  bore  a  conspicuous  and 
most  honorable  part  in  the  cavalry  engagement  at  Ma- 
rianna,  Arkansas,  and  later  in  the  same  day  received  in  a 
skirmish,  among  other  wounds,  a  gun-shot  wound  in  the 
left  foot,  the  ball  so  lodging  as  to  defeat  the  efforts  of  the 
surgeons  to  locate  and  remove  it.  Being  wholly  dis- 
abled he  resigned  his  commission  April  4,  1863.  In  jus- 
tice to  him  the  War  Department,  in  subsequent  orders, 
corrected  his  record  to  read  "  honorably  mustered  out 
\pril  4,  [863."  A  year  later,  in  April,  [864,  the  ball  was 
sui  1  essfully  removed  at  Albany,  New  York.  While  dis- 
abled, he  took'  a  course  of  instruction  at  a  commercial 
school  ;  but,  with  the  restoration  of  a  fair  use  of  his  foot, 
he  entered  Colonel  Taggart's  military  school  in  Philadel- 
phia,— a  school  designed  to  fit  young  men  for  commis- 
sions in  the  volunteer  forces.  Experience  gained  with 
troops  in  the  field  gave  him  an  advantage  at  this  school, 
and,  stimulated  by  the  offer  of  a  commission  in  the 
Veteran  Reserve  Corps,  he  quickly  accomplished  the 
course  of  instruction,  graduating  ahead  of  students  who 
had  preceded  him  from  six  to  eighteen  months.  lie 
accepted  a  commission  as  second  lieutenant  in  the  Vet- 
eran Reserve  Corps  in  November,  [864. 


In  January,  1 866,  he  was  assigned  to  duty  in  the 
Bureau  of  Refugees,  Frecdmen,  and  Abandoned  Lands, 
at  Nashville.  Here  he  served  a  short  time  as  aide-de- 
camp on  the  staff  of  Brigadier-General  Clinton  B.  Fisk, 
commanding  the  District  of  Tennessee ;  and,  later,  as 
acting  assistant  adjutant-general  to  the  assistant  com- 
missioner of  the  Bureau  of  Refugees,  Freedmen,  and 
Abandoned  Lands  until  March,  1868.  While  stationed 
in  Nashville  he  read  law  with  D.  W.  Peabody,  of  the 
law-firm  of  Bradley  &  Peabody,  with  a  view  to  better 
equip  himself  for  the  important  and  often  very  delicate 
duties  devolving  upon  officers  serving  in  the  South 
during  the  reconstruction  period;  and  of  ultimately 
making  the  law  his  profession.  He  served  as  a  volun- 
teer until  mustered  out  in  January,  1867,  to  accept  a 
commission  in  the  regular  establishment. 

By  consolidation  of  the  I'orty-second  Infantry,  V.R.C., 
with  the  Sixth  Infantry,  he  became  an  officer  of  the  latter 
regiment.  He  was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant  in  1875, 
and  was  soon  after  appointed  adjutant  of  his  regiment, 
and  served  as  such  for  five  years.  During  the  greater 
part  of  the  years  [881—82  he  served  as  acting  judge- 
advocate  of  the  Department  of  the  Missouri,  and  for  a 
short  time  in  [882  as  instructor  of  law  at  the  Fort  Leav- 
enworth School  of  Application.  In  1885  he  was  again 
appointed  adjutant  of  his  regiment,  serving  in  that  ca- 
pacity for  three  years,  when  he  resigned  the  office  to 
accept  that  of  acting  judge-advocate  of  the  Department 
of  Dakota;  he  served  in  this  position  from  November  r, 
1886,  to  April  28,  1891.  He  was  promoted  captain  in 
July,  1889. 

He  is  a  member  of  the  bar.  His  earl)'  reading  in  the 
law  led  to  his  special  availability  as  a  judge-advocate  of 
courts-martial,  and  as  acting  judge-advocate  of  military 
departments,  in  which  fields  he  has  established  an  en- 
viable reputation  for  judicial  fairness,  ami  for  able  and 
accurate  work,  which  led  to  his  appointment  as  major 
and  judge-advocate  U.  S.  Army,  at  the  death  of  Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Curtis,  on  February  12,  1892. 

An  eye-witness  of  the  fight  at  Marianna  expresses  him- 
self as  follows : 

"  Lieutenant  Stephen  W.  Groesbeck  placed  himself 
at  the  head  of  deponent's  company,  and  appealed  to 
them  to  follow  him,  and  did  lead  it  in  a  full  charge  in 
column  upon  the  left  of  the  enemy's  line,  broke  the  line, 
and,  pursuing  the  advantages  so  gained,  had  put  the 
whole  force  of  the  enemy  to  flight  before  the  main 
command  could  come  up  to  participate  in  the  skirmish. 
.  .  .  Considering  the  fact  that  Lieutenant  Groesbeck  was 
compelled  to  assume  command  under  fire,  the  inspiration 
his  manner  gave  to  the  men  of  deponent's  company, 
and  the  vigor  and  success  of  the  charge,  ...  he  deems 
that  this  (then  young)  officer's  conduct  on  that  day  was 
of  unusual  gallantry  and  merit." 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


i/9 


CAPTAIN  FRANK  C.  GRUGAN,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Frank  C.  Grugan  (Second  Artillery)  was 
born  in  Pennsylvania  April  4,  1842,  and  earl}-  in  the  war 
of  the  Rebellion  entered  the  volunteer  service  as  a 
private  in  an  independent  company  of  heavy  artillery, 
June  4,  [861,  and  served  at  Fort  Delaware  to  August  5, 
1 86 1.  He  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the  One 
Hundred  and  Fourteenth  Pennsylvania  Infantry  August 
15,  1862,  and  promoted  first  lieutenant  September  1,  1863, 
serving  in  the  campaigns  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
and  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Fredericksburg,  Chancel- 
lorsville,  action  of  Orange  Grove,  operations  at  Mine- 
Run,  actions  of  Auburn,  Brandy  Station,  Kelly's  Ford, 
battles  of  the  Wilderness,  Spottsylvania,  North  Anna, 
Cold  Harbor,  siege  and  capture  of  Petersburg,  battle  of 
Hatcher's  Run,  and  the  campaign  ending  in  the  surrender 
of  General  R.  E.  Lee  April  9,  1865. 

Lieutenant  Grugcn  was  appointed  first  lieutenant  of 
the  Third  Pennsylvania  Cavalry  December  19,  1864,  and 
was  transferred  to  the  Fifth  Pennsylvania  Cavalry  May  8, 
1865,  from  which  he  was  honorably  mustered  out  Au- 
gust 7,  1865.  He  then  entered  the  regular  service  as  a 
private  of  the  general  service  August  18,  1865,  and 
served  first  at  Richmond,  Virginia,  and  then  was  placed 
on  duty  in  the  War  Department  to  May,  1866,  having 
been  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the  Second  Cavalry 
April  25,  1866,  and  brevetted  first  lieutenant  for  "  gallant 
and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of  Hatcher's  Run, 
Virginia,"  and  captain  for  "gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices during  the  war." 

Captain  Grugan  joined  the  Second  Cavalry  on  the 
Plains,  and  served  at  Forts  Laramie  and  Casper,  Wyoming, 
and  in  the  field  during  1866-67;  then  at  Camp  Stam- 
baugh,  Wyoming  ;  Fort  Ellis,  Montana;  and  in  the  field 
from  1870  to  1873.  He  was  then  detailed  on  signal  duty, 
under  the  chief  signal-officer  of  the  army,  from  1873  to 
1879,  when  he  was  ordered  to  the  Artillery  School  at 
Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  he  having  been  transferred  to  the 
Second  Artillery,  April  11,  1879,  as  first  lieutenant,  he 
having  reached  that  rank  in  the  cavalry  November  1 ,  1 867. 


After  remaining  at  Fort  Monroe  until  1882,  he  was 
placed  on  special  duty  with  the  chief  signal-officer  of  the 
army  from  June  to  October  of  the  same  year,  when  he 
was  relieved,  and  served  with  a  light  battery  at  Washing- 
ton City  until  March,  1885.  He  was  promoted  captain 
March  [8,  1885,  and  commanded  Battery  B,  Second 
Artillery,  at  Fort  Barrancas,  Florida,  to  March,  1889. 
At  this  time  he  was  transferred  to  Light  Battery  A,  and 
served  with  it  at  Little  Rock  Barracks,  Arkansas,  and 
Fort  Riley,  Kansas,  to  July,  1S91. 

Upon  being  relieved  from  light  battery  duty  he  was 
ordered  to  Fort  Adams,  Rhode  Island,  in  command  of 
Battery  H,  and  is  at  the  present  time  on  duty  at  that 
station. 

Captain  Grugan  filled  the  position  of  aide  and  acting 
assistant  adjutant-general  of  the  First  Brigade,  First 
Division,  Third  Army  Corps,  in  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
to  April,  1 864.  He  was  post  adjutant  at  the  head-quarters 
of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  to  December,  1864.  He 
was  adjutant  of  the  Third  Pennsylvania  Cavalry  to  May, 
1865,  and  regimental  quartermaster  of  the  Second  Cavalry 
from  November,  1867,  to  July,  1870. 


i8o 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


G  )MMODORK  JOHN  GUEST,  U.S.N,  (deceased). 

Commodore  John  Guest  was  a  native  of  Missouri, 
but  was  appointed  midshipman  from  Arkansas  in  De- 
cember, [837.  For  several  years  he  served  in  the  West 
India  Squadron,  in  the  "Levant,"  "Constellation," 
"  Boston,"  and  "Warren."  Having  completed  his  sea- 
service  .is  midshipman,  lie  was  ordered  to  the  naval 
school,  then  at  the  Naval  Asylum,  at  Philadelphia,  and 
passed  in  June,  1S43.  For  some  time  after  he  served  in 
the  "  Poinsett,"  in  the  survey  of  Tampa  P>ay  ;  and  was 
then  attached  to  the  frigate  "Congress,"  of  the  Pacific 
Squadron,  for  three  years.  This  was  during  the  Mexican 
War,  and  Commodore  Guest  took-  part  in  the  battle  of 
San  Gabriel,  January,  1848,  and  the  battle  at  Mesa, 
California,  January  9,  1848. 

1  le  was  commissioned  as  lieutenant  in  December,  [850, 
when  he  served  in  the  sloop-of-war  "  Plymouth,"  and 
the  steam-frigate  "  Susquehanna,"  and  was  in  the  Japan 
Expedition,  and  at  the  first  landing  in  that  country, 
under  Commodore  Matthew  C.  Perry.  During-  subse- 
quent servici  in  the  East  India  Squadron,  from  1X51  to 
1  855,  he  boarded  the  Chinese  man-of-war,  "  Sir  1 1.  C<  imp- 
ton,"  at  Shanghai,  with  a  cutter  from  the  "Plymouth," 
and   liberated  a  pilot-boat's  crew,  who  were   under  the 


protection  of  our  flag.  In  April,  1S54,  was  second  in 
command  of  the  "  Plymouth,''  Captain  John  Kelley,  in  a 
severe  and  victorious  action  at  Shanghai,  to  prevent 
aggression  upon  foreign  residents. 

Upon  his  return  he  was  on  duty  at  Washington,  and 
then  served  in  the  "  Niagara,"  which  laid  the  first  cable- 
across  the  Atlantic,  1857-58.  During  1859  he  was  on 
rendezvous  duty  in  Philadelphia. 

In  i860  he  was  again  ordered  to  the  frigate  "  Niagara," 
employed  in  taking  home  the  first  Japanese  embassy 
which  visited  our  country. 

When  the  troublous  times  of  1861  came,  Lieutenant 
Guest  for  some  time  commanded  the  "  Niagara,"  of  the 
West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron.  During  this  period, 
in  command  of  the  boats  of  "  Niagara,"  he  cut  out  the 
schooner  "  Aid,"  which  was  under  the  protection  of  the 
guns  of  Fort  Morgan,  at  the  entrance  to  Mobile  Bay. 

In  1862  he  was  in  command  of  the  "  Owasco,"  and  in 
her  participated  in  the  passage  of  the  forts  below  New 
Orleans,  the  capture  of  that  city  and  the  battles  on  the 
Mississippi  River  up  to  and  including  Vicksburg,  1862. 

He  was  made  commander  in  July,  1862,  and  served  in 
the  "  Owasco"  at  the  fight  and  capture  of  the  Galveston 
forts. 

In  1863  he  was  in  command  of  monitor  "Sangamon," 
of  the  South  Atlantic  Squadron.  The  "Sangamon"  was 
the  first  United  States  vessel  to  be  fitted  with  a  spar 
torpedo,  the  invention  of  her  commander.  During  1864 
he  commanded  "  Galatea,"  on  convoy  duty  in  the  West 
Indies.  In  the  latter  part  of  that  year,  and  1865,  he 
commanded  "  Iosco,"  at  both  attacks  upon  Fort  Fisher. 
He  was  commissioned  captain  in  1866,  and  commodore 
in  December,  1872,  when  he  became  senior  officer  of  the 
Board  of  Inspection,  and  continuing  as  such  until  1876. 

He  became  commandant  of  the  navy-yard,  Ports- 
mouth, New  Hampshire,  in  1877,  and  died  there,  while 
still  in  command,  January,  1879. 

Commodore  Guest  was  one  of  the  most  active  and 
daring  officers  of  the  navy,  and  was  repeatedly  com- 
mended by  commanders  of  squadrons  on  that  account. 
At  Fort  Fisher  the  "  Iosco's"  fire  twice  cut  away  the 
flag-staff  of  the  Mound  Battery. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


1S1 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL   PETER  C.  HAINS,  U.S.A. 

Lieutenant- Colonel  Peter  C.  Hains  (Corps  of 
Engineers)  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  July 
6,  1840.  He  was  graduated  from  the  U.  S.  Military 
Academy  in  the  Class  of  June,  [861,  and  appointed  a  first 
lieutenant  in  the  Second  Regiment  of  Artillery.  Imme- 
diately on  graduating  he  repaired,  with  other  members  of 
his  class,  to  Washington,  and  was  assigned  to  the  drilling 
of  volunteer  troops,  at  that  time  assembling  at  the  capital. 

As  an  artillery  officer  he  was  engaged  in  the  first  battle 
of  Bull  Run,  in  the  siege  of  Yorktown,  in  the  battles  of 
Williamsburg,  Hanover  Court-House,  and  Malvern  II ill 
(July  1). 

In  Jul}-,  1862,  he  was  transferred  to  the  Corps  of  Topo- 
graphical Engineers,  but  continued  to  serve  with  the 
artillery.  In  the  second  battle  of  Malvern  Hill  his  bat- 
tery commander,  the  gallant  Captain  Benson,  was  mortally 
wounded,  and  the  command  devolved  on  him.  He  con- 
tinued in  the  command  of  the  battery,  being  engaged 
in  the  battles  of  South  Mountain  and  Antietam,  as  well 
as  in  several  skirmishes  prior  and  subsequent  to  those 
battles,  until  the  latter  part  of  September,  1862,  when  he- 
was  assigned  as  assistant  topographical  engineer  at  the 
head-quarters  Army  of  the  Potomac. 

When  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  was  organized  into 
three  grand  divisions,  he  was  assigned  as  chief  topo- 
graphical engineer  of  the  Centre  Grand  Division,  Major- 
General  Hooker  commanding,  participating  in  the  battle 
of  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  December  13,  1862,  and  con- 
tinued with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  until  March,  1863, 
when  he  was  transferred  to  the  Arm}-  of  the  Tennessee, 
at  that  time  about  to  begin  the  turning  movement  that 
resulted  in  the  capture  of  Vicksburg,  Mississippi. 

He  was  assigned  to  duty  as  chief  engineer  of  the 
Thirteenth  Arm)'  Corps,  and  participated  in  the  battles 
of  Port  Gibson,  Champion  Hills,  Black  River  Bridge,  the 
two  assaults  on  Vicksburg,  and  conducted,  throughout 
the  entire  siege,  the  operations  in  front  of  the  Thirteenth 
Army  Corps.  After  the  surrender,  he  accompanied  Sher- 
man's army  in  its  operations  against  Johnston,  which 
resulted  in  the  capture  of  Jackson,  Mississippi. 

In  August,  1863,  he  was  assigned  to  the  duty  of  con- 
structing an  intrenched  camp  at  Natchez,  Mississippi, 
and  remained  there  until  April,  [864,  when  he  was  trans- 
ferred to  General  Banks's  army,  at  that  time  returning 
from  the  Red  River  campaign.  He  joined  Banks's  army 
at  the  mouth  of  the  Red  River,  and  in  July,  1804,  after 
the  army  had  returned  to  New  Orleans,  he  was  assigned 
to  duty  as  chief  engineer  of  the  Department  of  the  Gulf. 

Early  in  1865  he  was  offered  the  command  of  a  regi- 
ment of  volunteers  from  New  Jersey,  the  State  from  which 
he  was  appointed,  but,  owing  to  the  scarcity  of  engineer 
officers  at  that  time,  was  not  allowed  by  the  War  Depart- 


ment to  accept  it.  Subsequently — in  June,  1865 — he  was 
appointed  by  Governor  Parker,  of  New  Jersey,  colonel  of 
the  Tenth  New  Jersey  Volunteers,  but,  as  the  war  was 
about  closed,  he  was  not  mustered  into  the  volunteer 
service. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Hains  received  the  brevet  of  cap- 
tain for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  battle 
of  Hanover  Court-House,"  of  major  for  "gallant  and 
meritorious  services  in  the  siege  of  Vicksburg,"  and  of 
lieutenant-colonel  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services 
during  the  war." 

Since  the  war  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hains  has  been 
engaged  on  various  works  oi  a  civil  and  military  nature. 
For  three  years  he  was  in  command  of  the  Faigineer 
Post  of  Jefferson  Barracks,  Missouri.  Subsequent  to 
that  he  served  as  engineer  of  the  Fifth  and  Sixth  Light- 
House  Districts,  and  as  engineer  secretary  of  the  Light- 
Plouse  Board. 

In  1882  he  was  assigned  to  the  charge  of  the  reclama- 
tion of  the  Potomac  flats  at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  con- 
tinued in  charge  till  November,  1891,  when  that  work  was 
well  advanced  towards  completion. 

He  constructed  the  new  bridge  on  the  piers  of  the 
old  aqueduct  at  Georgetown,  D.  C. ;  a  bridge  across  the 
Anacostia  at  the  foot  of  Pennsylvania  Avenue ;  a  large 
iron  pier  at  Fort  Monroe,  Virginia,  and  a  bridge  across 
Mill  Creek. 

Besides  having  served  as  a  member  of  various  boards 
of  engineers,  he  had  charge  of  the  improvement  of  a 
number  of  rivers  and  creeks  in  the  States  of  Virginia  and 
Maryland,  as  well  as  the  defensive  works  of  Hampton 
Roads  and  the  capital. 

The  present  station  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hains  is 
Portland,  Maine,  where  he  has  charge  of  all  river  and 
harbor  works  of  improvement  and  the  military  works  of 
defence  of  the  States  of  Maine  and  New  Hampshire. 


182 


OFFICERS  OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR-GENERAL  HENRY  WAGER  HALLECK,  U.S.A. 
(deceased). 

Major-General  Henry  Wager  Hali.eck  was  born 
at  Waterville,  Oneida  County,  New  York,  January  15, 
1S15.  After  studying  a  short  time  at  Union  College, 
he,  in  1835,  entered  the  West  Point  Military  Acad- 
emy, and  graduated  in  1839,  when  he  was  promoted 
to  the  army  as  second  lieutenant  in  the  corps  of  engi- 
neers, being  at  the  same  time  appointed  assistant  pro- 
fessor of  engineering  at  the  Academy.  In  the  following 
year  he  was  made  an  assistant  to  the  board  of  engineers 
at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  from  1S41  to  1844  was  em- 
ployed in  connection  with  the  fortifications  of  New  York 
harbor. 

In  1845,  Lieutenant  Ilalleck  was  sent  by  the  govern- 
ment to  examine  the  principal  military-  establishments  of 
Eumpe,  and  during  his  absence  he  was  promoted  to  the 
ranlc  of  first  lieutenant.  After  his  return,  he,  in  the 
winter  of  1845-46,  delivered  at  the  Lowell  Institute, 
Boston,  a  course  of  twelve  lectures  on  the  science  of  war, 
published  in  [846,  under  the  title  of  "  Elements  of  Mili- 
tary Art  and  Science,"  and  republished  with  additions, 
in  1861. 

On  the  outbreak  of  the  Mexican  War,  Lieutenant 
Ilalleck,  in  1  N4'  >.  as  military  engineer,  accompanied  the 
expedition  to  California  and  the  Pacific  coast,  where  he 
distinguished  himself  not  only  as  an  engineer,  but  by  his 
administrative  skill  as  secretary  of  state,  and  by  his 
presence  of  mind  and  bravery  in  several  skirmishes  with 


the  enemy.  In  1847,  he  was  brevetted  to  the  rank  of 
captain.  He  continued  for  several  years  tp  act  on  the 
staff  of  General  Riley,  in  California,  holding  at  the  same 
time  the  office  of  Secretary  of  State  of  the  Province ; 
and  he  took  a  leading  part  in  framing  the  State  Consti- 
tution of  California,  on  its  being  admitted  into  the  Union. 

In  1852  he  was  appointed  inspector  and  engineer  of 
light-houses,  and  in  1853  was  promoted  captain  of  engi- 
neers. He,  however,  in  1854,  resigned  his  commission 
in  the  army,  in  order  to  devote  his  chief  attention  to  the 
practice  of  law,  which  he  had  already,  for  some  time, 
carried  on  ;  and  so  great  was  his  success  in  his  profession 
that  the  firm  of  which  he  was  senior  partner  soon  ob- 
tained one  of  the  largest  legal  businesses  in  the  State. 
He  was  also,  from  1850,  a  director  of  the  New  Almaden 
Quicksilver  Mine,  and  in  1855  he  became  president  of 
the  Pacific  and  Atlantic  Railroad,  from  San  Francisco  to 
San  Jose. 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  War,  he  was,  in  August, 
1 86 1 ,  appointed  major-general  of  the  United  States  Army, 
and  in  the  following  November  was  appointed  com- 
mander of  the  Western  Department,  where  he  conducted 
the  campaign  against  the  Confederates,  which  caused  the 
evacuation  of  the  strongly-fortified  city  of  Corinth.  In 
July,  1862,  he  was  appointed  general-in-chief  of  the 
armies  of  the  United  States, — a  position  he  held  until 
March,  1S64,  when  he  was  succeeded  by  General  Grant, 
and  was  appointed  chief  of  the  staff. 

In  April,  1865,  General  Halleck  held  the  command  of 
the  Military  Division  of  the  James,  and  in  August  of  the 
same  year,  of  the  Military  Division  of  the  Pacific,  which 
he  retained  until  March,  1869,  when  he  was  transferred 
to  that  of  the  South, — -a  position  he  held  until  his  death, 
at  Louisville,  Kentucky,  January  9,  187J. 

Besides  his  work  on  the  "  Science  of  War,"  General 
Ilalleck  was  the  author  of  "  Bitumen :  Its  Varieties, 
Properties,  and  Uses,"  1841  ;  "The  Mining  Laws  of 
Spain  and  Mexico,"  1859;  a  translation  of  De  Fooz, 
"On  the  Law  of  Mines,"  with  an  introduction,  i860; 
"  International  Law,"  I S6 1  ;  a  translation  of  Jomini's 
"Life  of  Napoleon,"  1864;  and  a  "Treatise  on  Inter- 
national Law  and  the  Laws  of  War,  prepared  for  the 
use  of  Schools  and  Colleges,"  1866. 

He  was  appointed  professor  of  engineering  in  the 
Lawrence  Scientific  School  of  Harvard  University,  Mas- 
sachusetts, September  28,  184s,  which  he  declined.  The 
degree  of  A.M.  was  conferred  upon  him  by  Union  Col- 
lege, New  York,  in  1843,  and  that  of  LL.D.  in  1862. 


WHO  SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


133 


MAJOR-GENERAL  WINFIELD  S.  HANCOCK,   U.S.A. 
(deceased). 

Major-General  Winfield  S.  Hancock  was  born  in 
Pennsylvania,  and  graduated  from  the  U.  S.  Military 
Academy  July  i,  1844.  He  was  assigned  to  the  Sixth 
Infantry  as  brevet  second  lieutenant  July  1,  1844,  and 
served  on  frontier  duty  at  Fort  Towson,  Indian  Territory, 
1844.-45,  ami  at  Fort  Washington,  Indian  Territory, 
1845-47.  Promoted  second  lieutenant  Sixth  Infantry 
Jul}-  1,  1846.  He  participated  in  the  war  with  Mexico, 
1 847-48,  being  engaged  with  the  defence  of  convoy  at  the 
National  Bridge  August  12,  1847;  the  skirmish  at  Place 
del  Rio  August  15,  1847;  the  capture  of  San  Antonio 
August  20,  1847;  the  battle  of  Churubusco  August  20, 
1847;  the  battle  of  Molino  del  Rey  September  8,  1847, 
and  the  assault  and  capture  of  the  City  of  Mexico  Sep- 
tember 13-14,  1847. 

He  was  brevetted  first  lieutenant  August  20,  1847,  for 
gallant  and  meritorious  conduct  in  the  battles  of  Contre- 
ras  and  Churubusco,  Mexico.  He  was  promoted  first 
lieutenant  Sixth  Infantry  January  27,  1853,  and  from 
June  19  to  November  2/,  1855,  he  was  on  duty  at  head- 
quarters Department  of  the  West.  He  was  appointed 
captain  and  assistant  quartermaster  November  7,  1855, 
and  was  with  troops  at  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas, 
quelling  the  Kansas  disturbances  in  1857;  was  with  the 
head-quarters  of  the  Utah  reinforcements  in  1858,  and 
with  the  Sixth  Infantry  on  the  march  from  Fort  Bridger, 
Utah,  to  California,  the  same  year. 

He  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers  Sep- 
tember 23,  1 861,  and  served  during  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  participating  in  the  defence  of  Washington, 
D.  C,  and  in  the  Virginia  Peninsula  campaign,  Army  of 
the  Potomac  ;  being  engaged  in  the  siege  of  Yorktown  ; 
in  the  battles  of  Williamsburg,  Chickahominy,  Golding's 
Farm,  Savage  Station,  and  White  Oak  Swamp.  He- 
conducted  the  retreat  to  Harrison's  Landing  Jul}'  1-4, 
and  the  movement  to  Centrcville,  Virginia,  August  to 
September,  1862.  Was  in  the  Maryland  campaign,  Army 
of  the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Cramp- 
ton's  Pass,  South  Mountain,  and  Antietam.  He  conducted 
the  reconnoissances  from  Harper's  Ferry  to  Charleston, 
Virginia,  October  10-11,  and  the  march  to  Falmouth, 
Virginia,  October  to  November,  1862. 

He  was  appointed  major-general  of  U.  S.  Volunteers 
November  29,  1862.  During  the  Rappahannock  cam- 
paign he  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Fredericksburg 
and  Chancellorsville,  and  in  the  Pennsylvania  cam- 
paign was  in  command  of  Second  Corps  of  the  Army 
of  the  Potomac,  being  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Gettys- 
burg, where  he  was  severely  wounded  in  the  repulse  of 
Longstreet's  attack  upon  the  left  centre,  which  he  com- 
manded. 


The  thanks  of  Congress  were  tendered  him  May  30, 
1866,  "  for  his  gallant,  meritorious,  and  conspicuous  share 
in  the  great  and  decisive  victory." 

He  was  promoted  major  and  quartermaster  U.  S.  Army 
November  30,  1863.  Commanded  and  recruited  Sec- 
ond .Army  Corps,  January  to  March,  1864,  and  par- 
ticipated in  the  Richmond  campaign,  commanding  Sec- 
ond Corps  of  the  Arm}-  of  the  Potomac,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  battles  of  the  Wilderness,  Spottsylvania, 
North  Anna,  Tolopotomy,  Cold  Harbor,  and  operations 
in  its  vicinity  ;  and  the  battle  before  Petersburg  June 
16-18,  1864. 

During  the  operations  in  the  vicinity  of  Petersburg,  he 
was  in  command  of  the  Second  Corps  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  and  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Deep  Bottom, 
Ream's  Station,  Boydton  Plank  Road,  and  the  siege  of 
Petersburg,  Virginia,  June  15  to  Nov.  26,  1864.  He 
was  promoted  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army  August  12, 
1864. 

Prom  November  27,  1864,  to  February  27,  1865,  he- 
was  at  Washington,  D.  C,  organizing  the  First  Army 
Corps  of  Veterans,  and  from  February  27  to  July  18, 
1865,  he  was  in  command  of  Department  of  West  Vir- 
ginia, and  temporarily  of  the  Middle  Division  and  Army 
of  the  Shenandoah. 

He  was  brevetted  major-general  U.  S.  Army  Novem- 
ber 13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the 
battle  of  Spottsylvania,  Virginia.  He  was  in  command 
of  the  Middle  Department  from  Jul}-  18,  1865,  to  Au- 
gust 10,  1866,  and  of  the  Department  of  Missouri  from 
August  20,  1866.  During  part  of  1867  he  was  engaged 
in  an  expedition  against  the  Indians  on  the  Plains. 

General  Hancock  commanded  also  for  man}-  years  the 
Department  of  the  East,  and  was  a  candidate  for  the 
Presidency  of  the  United  States  in  1880.  He  died  Feb- 
ruary 9,  1 886. 


[84 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  (regular) 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  MARTIN    D.  HARDIN.  U.S.A. 
(retired). 

Brigadier-General  Martin  1).  Hardin  was  born  at 
Jacksonville,  Morgan  County,  Illinois,  June  26,  1837. 
His  great-grandfather,  John  Hardin,  was  an  officer  of 
Morgan's  Rifles  in  the  Revolutionary  War ;  his  grand- 
father, Martin  D.  Hardin,  was  a  Senator  from  Kentucky, 
and  served  with  distinction  as  an  officer  under  General 
Harrison  in  the  war  of  iNu;  his  father,  John  J.  Hardin, 
was  a  prominent  lawyer  in  Illinois,  served  in  Congress 
as  a  member  in  [843  and  1844,  and  was  killed  at  the 
battle  of  Buena  Vista,  Mexico,  while  commanding  the 
First  Illinois  Volunteers. 

General  Hardin  graduated  at  West  point  in  1859,  and 
was  attached  to  the  Third  Art.;  served  at  the  Artillery 
School  at  Fortress  Monroe,  and  accompanied  the  force 
sent  to  recapture  Harper's  Ferry  at  the  time  of  the 
John  Brown  raid.  Joined  Major  Blake's  expedition, 
which  left  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  May  3,  [860.  It  as- 
cended the  Missouri  River  to  its  head-waters,  crossed 
the  Rock)  Mountains  by  Mullan's  Road,  and  reached 
Fori  Vancouver  in  October.  Lieut.  Hardin  was  in  com- 
mand ol  Fort  (Jmpequa,  Oregon,  when  the  late  war 
began. 

He  came  cast  with  the  Third  Art.  in  the  fall  of  1 86 1  ; 
served  in  the  defences  of  Wa  hington,  ami  with  Me  Call's 
l)i\ision  of  Pennsylvania  Reserves  until  March,  iSoj, 
wa  :  aide-de-camp  to  Colonel  Hunt,  commanding  the  Ait. 
Reserves,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  at  the  siege  of  York- 
town,  and  "Seven  Hays'  Battles"  before  Richmond. 

He  was  colonel  commanding  the  Twelfth  Regiment 
Pennsylvania  Reserves,  July  8,  1862,  and  present  in 
Pope's  campaign ;  was  slightly  wounded  at  the  battle  of 
Groveton,  and  severely  wounded  at  second  Bull  Run, 
whilst  commanding  Third   Brigade  of  the  Pennsylvania 


Reserves.  Commanded  his  regiment  at  Gettysburg,  and 
Third  Brigade  Pennsylvania  Reserves  at  combats  of 
Falling  Waters,  Rappahannock  Station,  Bristoe  Sta- 
tion, and  Mine  Run  campaign.  lie  was  severely 
wounded  (losing  left  arm)  whilst  commanding  troops 
guarding  Orange  and  Alexandria  Railroad,  December 
14.  1863. 

On  light  duty  January  \2  to  May,  1864,  and  then 
commanded  First  Brigade  Pennsylvania  Reserves,  Third 
Division  Fifth  Corps,  at  battles  of  Spottsylvania,  North 
Anna  (when  slightly  wounded),  Tolopotomy,  and  Be- 
thesda  Church.  In  this  latter  battle  the  First  Brig- 
ade Pennsylvania  Reserves  was  sent  to  the  front  to  re- 
connoitre. Its  skirmishers  ran  against  the  Confederate 
breastworks,  a  short  distance  in  front  of  the  church. 
When  the  brigade  in  line  reached  the  church,  it  halted, 
tore  down  the  fences,  piled  up  the  rails,  and  laid  down 
behind  these  piles.  Scarcely  were  the  men  in  position 
when  Ramseur's  Confederate  division  charged  down  the 
pike.  The  Confederates  came  on  in  such  large  force,  and 
with  such  an  impetus,  that  the  volley  from  Hardin's 
small  brigade  made  no  apparent  impression.  Soon  the 
other  brigades  of  Third  Division  fifth  Corps  joined 
Hardin's,  and  a  line  of  battle  was  formed  across  the 
country  road.  This  line  the  Confederate  division,  after 
changing  front,  charged.  The  Confederates  were  re- 
pulsed with  severe  loss. 

Colonel  Hardin  was  appointed  brigadier-general  July 
2,  1S64,  and  assigned  to  the  command  of  the  defences 
of  Washington,  north  of  the  Potomac.  He  was  en- 
gaged  in  defence  of  the  Capital  against  the  Confeder- 
ate General  Early's  army,  July,  1  K64. 

These  defences  had  been  stripped  of  the  proper  garri- 
son to  reinforce  General  Grant's  armies.  Two  regiments 
of  one-hundred-day  men  and  a  few  dismounted  batter- 
ies formed  the  garrison  for  fourteen  miles  of  defences. 
The  entile  fence  was  put  on  the  picket-line,  when,  meet- 
ing Early's  skirmishers  ami  making  a  strong  resistance, 
the  Confederate  advance  force  reported  that  the  forts 
and  outworks  were  fully  manned,  thus  causing  General 
Early  to  delay  an  attack-  in  force.  This  attack  would  un- 
doubtedly have  been  successful,  had  it  been  made  before 
reinforcements  to  the  garrison  arrived. 

General  Hardin  was  relieved  of  the  command  of  the 
defences  of  Washington,  and  assigned  to  command  of 
District  of  Raleigh,  North  Carolina,  August,  1865. 

After  the  war  he  served  in  the  Department  of  the 
Lakes  as  staff  officer,  and  at  times  in  command  of  Forts 
Wayne,  Porter,  or  Gratiot. 

Retired  as  brigadier-general  December  15,  1870,  for 
loss  of  left  arm  and  other  wounds.  He  practised  law 
in  Chicago,  and  has  written  a  history  of  the  Twelfth 
Reginn  nt  Pennsylvania  Reserves,  articles  for  maga- 
zines, rii 


WHO   SERVED    IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


1S5 


PAYMASTER  H.  T.  B.  HARRIS,  U.S.N. 

Paymaster  II.  T.  B.  Harris  entered  the  service 
as  captain's  clerk  in  March,  1863,  on  U.  S.  S.  "  [no," 
and  sailed  to  the  South  Atlantic  Ocean  as  convoy  to  the 
ship  "  Aquila,"  with  the  monitor  "Comanche"  on  board 
in  sections,  for  San  Francisco. 

She  was  convoyed  to  about  10  '  south  latitude,  where 
the  "  Ino"  parted  with  her  and  proceeded  to  cruise  in 
search  of  the  rebel  cruiser  "  Alabama,"  reported  in  that 
locality.  The  "Ino"  cruised  for  several  months  with 
quite  a  number  of  exciting  incidents  in  the  way  oi 
false  alarms  as  to  identity  of  different  steamers  sighted ; 
but  the  "Alabama,"  with  her  well-known  elusiveness,  wa 
soon  reported  on  the  United  States  coast, — so  the  "  Ino" 
returned  to  New  York,  and  the  commanding  officer 
and  his  clerk  went  to  the  steamer  "Commodore  Bar- 
ney," serving  on  the  rivers  and  bays  of  Virginia  and 
North  Carolina.  In  May,  [864,  the  "  Barney"  rendered 
very  valuable  assistance  to  the  army  in  repelling  Hoke's 
attack  on  New  Berne,  firing  one  hundred  and  twenty 
rounds  with  her  IX. -inch  Dahlgrens  and  100-pounder 
Parrott  guns.  In  July  of  the  same  year,  while  the 
"  Barney"  was  at  the  head  of  Bachelor's  Bay,  guarding 
the  mouth  of  Roanoke  River,  the  ram  "Albemarle" 
appeared  and  was  hotly  engaged  by  the  "  Barney"  with 
her  100-pounder  Parrott  and  two  IX. -inch  Dahlgrens, 
which  compelled  her  to  return  toiler  moorings  at  Ply 
mouth. 

The  subject  of  this  sketch  was  at  this  time  acting  as 
signal-officer  of  the  ship,  and,  in  addition  to  that  duty, 
on  this  occasion,  commanded  the  forward  battery  of  three 
IX. -inch  guns  with  full  crews  of  contrabands.  After  the 
return  of  the  "Albemarle"  to  Plymouth,  he  volunteered 
to  go  with  a  boat's-crew  at  night  Lip  the  Middle  River  to 
a  point  opposite  Plymouth,  cross  the  swamp  to  a  point 
within  two  hundred  feet  of  the  ram,  to  observe  and  report 
upon  the  apparent  damage  to  her  from  the  shots  of  the 
"  Barney."  This  duty  was  fraught  with  some  danger,  as 
two  of  the  enemy's  picket-stations  were  passed,  and  the 
trip  through  the  cane  brake  was  exceedingly  difficult 
and  fatiguing,  but  was  successfully  accomplished,  and 
one  prisoner  taken, — a  poor  North  Carolina  conscript, 
going  up  the  river  in  a  canoe  to  visit  his  family,  who, 


having  seen  some  oi  the  reconnoitring  party,  was  made 
prisoner  to  prevent  his  divulging  their  presence,  which 
would  have  resulted  in  their  capture. 

Shortly  after  this  the  "Barney"  returned  to  Norfolk, 
where  the  commanding  officer  and  his  clerk  were  trans- 
ferred to  the  steamer  "  Emma,"  of  the  North  Atlantic 
Blockading  Squadron,  and  served  on  the  Wilmington 
blockade,  with  much  excitement  in  the  chase  of  blockade- 
runners  and  frequent  exchange  of  shots  with  the  bat- 
teries, until  October,  1864,  when  the  subject  of  this 
sketch,  who  had  been  acting  paymaster  of  the  ship  for 
two  months,  during  the  absence  through  sickness  of  the 
duly-appointed  officer,  was  ordered  to  New  York  for 
examination  for  appointment  as  acting  assistant  pay- 
master, to  which  grade  he  was  appointed  November  1, 
1864,  and  ordered  to  the  monitor  "  Naubuc"  at  New 
York;  afterwards  to  the  " Napa,"  at  Philadelphia.  On 
February  21,  [867,  was  appointed  assistant  paymaster; 
February  17,  1 869,  passed  assistant  paymaster,  and  Jan- 
uary iS,  [88 1, paymaster,  having  in  the  meantime  served 
in  every  squadron  and  at  the  naval  depots  at  the  Sand- 
wich Islands  and  Rio  de  Janeiro,  Brazil;  and  at  the  time 
of  writing  is  paymaster  of  the  navy-yard,  New  York, 
where  the  disbursements  exceed  three  millions  of  dollars 
per  year. 


24 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular 


FIRST    LIFUTFNANT  JOHN   C.    HARRIS.   U.S.M.C. 

First  Lieutenant  John  C.  Harris  was  born  near 
Philadelphia  in  1840;  admitted  to  theBarin  1861  ;  be- 
fore entering  the  service,  volunteered,  in  January,  [861, 
on  an  expedition  (p.  111*)  to  take  and  hold  Fort  Wash- 
ington, on  the  Potomac,  and  witnessed  the  first  Bull 
Run  disaster.  He  received  a  commission  in  1861 ,  in  the 
Marine  Corps,  of  which  his  uncle  was  then  chief. 

After  some  service  about  Washington,  he  was  placed  in 
command  of  the  guard  of  the  war-steamer,  "  Pensacola" 
(now,  thirty  years  later,  probably  the  only  vessel  of  that 
date,  still  in  active  service).  After  much  delay,  in  prepa- 
ration, she  passed  down  the  Potomac  (witli  President 
Lincoln  and  some  of  his  Cabinet,  until)  under  the  fire  of 
the  rebel  batteries,  which  failed,  after  repeated  efforts,  to 
seriously  injure  her.  At  Hampton  Roads  some  time  was 
spent  in  watching  for  the  rebel  iron-clad  "  Merrimac." 
In  February,  [862,  she  continued  South,  to  join  Admiral 
Farragut's  fleet ;  and,  after  almost  a  wreck  on  the  Florida 
reefs,  and  getting  off  witli  difficulty,  reached  Key  West, 
Florida;  refitted,  and  proceeded  to  Ship  Island,  where 
were  rendezvoused  the  fleet,  Porter's  mortar  flotilla,  and 
General  Butler's  army.  In  April,  1862,  after  heavy  fight- 
ing at  Forts  St.  Philip  and  Jackson,  and  the  Chalmette 
batteries,  (he  being  wounded,  and,  later,  brevetted  for 
"  gallant  and  meritorious  service"  there,)  (pp.  142-307*) — 
these  naval  forces  captured  New  (  Irleans,  where  the 
"Pensacola"  remained  over  a  year;  though  he  was  for 
a  time  a  volunteer  at  the  siege  of  port  Hudson,  with  his 
friend,  General  Godfrey  Weitzel,  of  the  U.S.  Engineers. 
Before  General  Butler's  troops  arrived,  Lieutenant  Harris 
was  thrice  landed,  with  his  men,  t<>  carry  out  Admiral 
Farragut's  different  orders  (pp.  141-142 

In  April,  1863,  he  was  ordered  North  ;  and  soon  after 
the  Union  repulse,  with  great  slaughter,  at  Fort  Wagner, 
off  Charleston,  was  made  adjutant  of  a  battalion  (p.  146*) 


of  five  hundred  men,  sent  from  New  York,  to  lead  a 
second  storming-party  against  the  Fort;  which,  with  Fort 
Gregg,  was  soon  after  taken,  and  the  rebels  cleared  off 
Morris  Bland.  After  these  captures  and  the  assault 
on  Fort  Sumter, — in  which  he  was  again  a  volunteer  (p. 
147*),  in  a  picked  body  of  one  hundred  men,  called  for  by 
Admiral  Dahlgren, — the  command  retired  to  Foll_\-  Island, 
where  the  long  stay  on  the  Mississippi  and  exposure  off 
Charleston,  with  bad  food  and  water,  culminated  in  a 
severe  fever,  which  sent  him,  successively,  to  the  hospital- 
ship  "Vermont;"  to  the  hospital  at  Beaufort,  South  Car- 
olina; and,  when  able  to  travel,  back  to  the  North. 

A  short  service  thereafter  (in  which  he  again  volun- 
teered) against  the  rebel  cavalry  raider,  General  Harry 
Gilmore  (under  Ewell)  in  Maryland  (p.  154*),  terminated 
his  war  experiences; — as  the  war  about  then  ceased. 
Service  on  man_\-  courts-martial  (in  which  he  was  gener- 
ally Judge-Advocate)  and  at  the  Philadelphia  Navy- Yard 
then  occupied  him,  until  the  U.  S.  S.  " Ticonderoga" 
(whose  guard  he  commanded)  sailed  in  November,  1865, 
tor  the  European  Squadron  ;  where  he  spent  some  three 
years  under  Admirals  Farragut  and  Goldsborough,  vis- 
iting all  the  main  ports  of  Europe,  the  East,  and  North 
and  West  Africa,  with  the  Madeiras,  Azores,  Canaries, 
Balearics,  etc., — a  cruise  of  unsurpassed  interest;  oppor- 
tunity having  been  given  for  travelling,  also,  through  the 
interiors  of  countries.  On  his  return  to  the  United  States 
with  Admiral  Farragut,  in  1869,  on  the  frigate  "  Frank- 
lin," he  resigned,  and  resumed  business-life.  The  Na:[al 
Register  of  that  year  credits  him  with  more  "  sea-service" 
than  any  of  the  corps  of  his  date,  or  of  the  six  preceding 
dates, — one  officer  excepted;  who,  however,  was  three 
dates  ahead  of  him. 

On  both  sides  of  his  family  he  came  from  pre-Revolu- 
tionary  Pennsylvania  ancestry.  I  lis  grandfathers,  General 
William  Harris,  of  Pennsylvania,  whose  monument  is  at 
the  Great  Valley  Church,  near  Philadelphia,  and  Colonel 
Persifor  Frazcr  on  his  maternal  side,  both  served  with 
the  Pennsylvania  troops  under  General  Washington.  His 
Frazer  and  Campbell  ancestors  evidence  his  partly  Scotch 
origin,  and  the  Harris  name,  (which  is  identified  with  I  Iar- 
risburg,  the  capital  of  Pennsylvania)  is  English,  being  the 
family  name  of  the  Earls  of  Malmesbury. 

As  he  only  served  when  quite  young,  and  in  the 
regular  Navy,  where  promotion  awaited  a  vacancy  ahead, 
there  was  no  opportunity  for  other  advance,  as  in  the 
army.  I  lew  as  simply  one  of  the  million  or  more,  whose 
course  of  life,  was  deflected  by  the  war-call  of  the  coun- 
try, who  did  what  occasion  offered ;  and  the  survivors, 
when  no  more  needed,  returned  whence  they  came.  This 
modest  record,  therefore,  he  says,  "must  be  of  interest 
mainly  to  his  fellow-officers  and  friends." 

*  Collum's  "  Marine  Corps." 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


187 


CAPTAIN    MOSES   HARRIS,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Moses  Harris  (First  Cavalry)  was  born  in 
New  Hampshire  September  6,  1839.  Entering  the  reg- 
ular army  as  a  private  soldier  in  Troop  G,  First  Cavalry, 
he  passed  through  the  various  grades  to  that  of  first  ser- 
geant, and  then  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  of  the 
same  regiment  May  18,  1864. 

Prior  to  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  he  served  on  the 
Indian  frontier,  and  participated  in  an  expedition  against 
Cheyenne  Indians  in  1857,  under  General  Sumner.  In 
the  summer  of  1858  he  marched  with  the  troops  to 
Sweetwater  River,  Nebraska,  en  route  to  Salt  Lake  City, 
and  returned  to  Fort  Riley.  He  again  participated  in  an 
expedition  against  Kiowa  Indians,  under  General  Sedg- 
wick, in  i860.  He  was  at  Fort  Wise,  Kansas,  at  the 
breaking  out  nf  the  Rebellion,  when  the  designation  of 
the  regiment  was  changed  from  First  to  Fourth  Cavalry. 
After  re-enlisting  and  being  furloughed  for  two  months, 
in  1862  he  rejoined  his  troop  in  the  field  at  Nashville, 
and  participated  in  the  various  marches  and  campaigns 
of  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland  from  March,  1862,  to 
June,  1864,  when  he  took  part  in  the  Atlanta  campaign 
as  far  as  Kenesaw  Mountain,  participating  in  various 
cavalry  affairs  and  skirmishes,  lie  was  promoted  first 
lieutenant  August  15,  1864. 

Captain  Harris  took  part  in  the  following  engage 
ments  :  Action  at  Solomon's  Fork,  Kansas,  in  1 S 5  ~  ; 
affair  at  Blackwater  Springs,  Kansas,  in  i860;  battles  of 
Shiloh,  Corinth,  Perryville, and  Stone  River,  1862  ;  Spring 
Hill,  Snow  Hill,  Franklin,  Middleton,  Shelbyville,  Ring- 
gold, and  Chickamauga,  1863;  Dallas,  Georgia;  Deep 
Bottom,  Virginia ;  Newtown,  Virginia;  Shepherdstown, 
Virginia;  Leetown,  Smithfield,  Winchester,  Millford, 
Waynesborough,  Tom's  Creek,  and  Cedar  Creek,  Vir- 
ginia, in  1864;  and  Appomattox  Court-House,  April  9, 
1865.  He  was  brevetted  a  captain  September  19,  1864, 
for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of 
Winchester." 

Shortly  after  the  close  of  the  war  we  find  the  captain 
on  duty  at  New  Orleans;  and  in  1866  he  was  transferred 
to  the  Pacific  coast,  with  many  changes  of  stations, 
numerous  affairs  with  Indians,  and  disagreeable  long 
marches.  He  was  engaged  in  scouting  operations  against 
hostile  Apaches  from  September,  1869,  to  March,  1870, 
taking  part  in  several  small  engagements.  He  was  en- 
gaged in  constructing  a  wagon-road  to  the  new  post 
in  the  White  Mountains,  Arizona  Territory,  in  1870-71. 
He  was  then  detailed  for  recruiting  service,  from  which 
he  returned  to  Benicia  Barracks  in  the  early  part  of  1873. 


In  the  summer  of  1874  the  captain  was  camped  in  the 
Wallowa  Valley,  Washington  Territory,  watching  restless 
Nez  Perce  Indians  under  Chief  Joseph,  and  afterwards 
took  station  at  Fort  Colville.  In  1878  he  received  a  six- 
months'  leave  of  absence,  but  his  troop  being  ordered 
into  the  field  against  the  hostile  Snake  and  Bannock 
Indians,  he  surrendered  the  unexpired  portion  and  joined 
his  troop  in  the  field  in  August,  and  participated  in  that 
campaign  under  General  O.  O.  Howard.  After  attending 
the  usual  round  of  post  duties,  member  of  boards,  scout- 
ing, etc.,  he  was  in  1881  ordered  to  Arizona  for  field  duty. 
On  October  4  he  left  Lathrop  with  troop  by  rail  for 
Arizona;  on  the  7th  he  took  the  trail  of  hostile  Apaches 
at  San  Simeon  Station,  Arizona,  and  pursued  them  to 
the  Mexican  line.  After  being  stationed  at  Fort  Hua- 
chuca  and  Fort  Bowie  until  January,  1S82,  he  proceeded 
to  and  took  station  at  the  Presidio  of  San  Francisco.  In 
February  of  that  year  he  was  detailed  on  a  board  for 
the  purchase  of  cavalry  horses,  and  in  April  he  was 
again  ordered  to  Arizona,  and  was  scouting  against  hos- 
tile Apaches  until  May  25,  when  he  returned  to  the 
Presidio  ;  but  the  station  of  his  regiment  was  changed  in 
1S84  to  Montana,  and  his  troop  was  assigned  to  Fort 
Custer,  from  which  post  he  was  detached,  August  15, 
1886,  for  duty  in  Yellowstone  Park.  He  established  the 
post  of  Camp  Sheridan  at  Mammoth  Hot  Springs,  and 
continued  to  perform  the  duties  of  superintendent  of  the 
park  and  commander  of  post  of  Camp  Sheridan  until 
June  1,  18S9,  when  he  took-  station  at  Fort  Custer,  Mon- 
tana, remaining  there  until  his  regiment  was  ordered  to 
Arizona  in  1892. 


1 88 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


COMMANDER-IN-CHIFF  BENJAMIN  HARRISON.  U.S.A. 

Commander-in-Chief  Benjamin  Harrison  (President 
of  the  United  States)  is  the  son  of  John  Scott  Harrison, 
and  grandson  of  General  Win.  Henry  Harrison,  President 
of  the  United  States  from  March  4  to  April  4,  1841.  I  le 
was  born  at  North  Bend,  Indiana,  in  his  grandfather's 
house,  August  20,  1833,  graduated  from  Miami  University 
in  Class  of  1852;  he  subsequently  passed  through  a  legal 
course,  and  began  practice  of  law  , it  Indianapolis  in  1854. 

In  the  early  part  of  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  Mr. 
Harrison  tendered  his  services  to  Governor  Morton,  of 
Indiana,  and  the  latter  authorized  him  to  raise  a  regi- 
ment. When  the  regiment  was  complete,  Governor 
Morton  voluntarily  commissioned  Mr.  Harrison  colonel 
of  the  Seventieth  Regiment,  Indiana  Volunteers. 

When  Bragg  was  hastening  with  the  main  body  of  his 
army  to  Louisville,  considerable  excitement  was  created, 
and  Colonel  Harrison's  regiment — although  muskets  had 
just  been  issued  to  them  and  they  did  not  even  know 
how  to  handle  them — was  hurried  to  Bowling  Green, 
Kentucky,  which  was  at  that  time  fortified,  and  had 
become  a  Union  outpost,  below  which  even-thin-  had 
been  broken  by  the  Confederates. 

Colonel  Harrison's  first  experience  as  an  independent 
commander  was  when  he  was  sent  on  an  expedition 
list  a  body  ,,f  rebels  lodged  at  Russellville.  His 
command  was  put  aboard  a  train  at  Bowling  Green  and 
hurried  off  When  within  about  ten  miles  of  the  town 
he  was  stopped  by  a  burned  bridge.  (  Inly  a  portion  of 
a  span  was  gone,  however,  and  he  made  a  pier  of  railroad 
ties  m  the  centre,  then  cut  down  a  couple  of  large  trees 
and  pushed  them  across  the  break.  Prom  a  side-track 
near  by,  rails  were  torn  up  and  laid  upon  the  timbers. 
He  pushed  on  with  his  train  over  the  temporary  bri< 
and  arriving  at  a  proper  point,  after  making  his  military 
dispositions   he   suddenly  and    with   energy  attacked   tin 


rebel  camp.  The  surprise  was  complete.  Forty  rebels 
were  killed  and  wounded,  while  only  one  Union  soldier 
was  killed.  He  captured  ten  prisoners  and  all  the  horses 
and  arms,  and  then  returned  to  Bowling  Green. 

Colonel  Harrison's  regiment  was  brigaded  with  the 
Seventy-ninth  (  )hio,  and  the  One  Hundred  and  Second, 
One  Hundred  and  Fifth,  and  the  One  Hundred  and 
Twenty-ninth  Illinois,  Brigadier-General  Ward  com- 
manding; and,  what  is  extraordinary,  the  organization 
thus  effected  was  kept  unchanged  to  the  close  of  the  war. 
From  Bowling  Green,  Colonel  Harrison,  with  his  com- 
mand, accompanied  the  brigade  to  Scottville,  Kentucky, 
ami  thence  to  Gallatin,  Tennessee,  where  he  was  occupied 
guarding  the  Louisville  and  Nashville  Railroad.  Four 
months  were  evenly  divided  between  hunting  guerillas  and 
drilling  his  men.  Fhe  brigade  then  marched  to  Lavcrgne 
and  thence  to  Murfreesborough.  There  it  became  part  of 
Granger's  Reserve  Corps.  On  the  2d  of  January,  1864,  it 
became  the  First  Brigade  of  the  First  Division  of  the 
Eleventh  Army  Corps,  and  Colonel  Harrison  was  placed 
in  command  of  it,  General  Ward  taking  the  division. 

Shortly  after  this  the  Eleventh  and  Twelfth  Army 
Corps  were  consolidated  into  the  Twentieth,  whereupon 
Ward's  old  brigade  became  the  First  Brigade  of  the 
Third  Division  of  the  Twentieth  Corps;  and,  as  General 
Ward  returned  to  the  command  of  the  brigade,  Colonel 
Harrison  resumed  that  of  his  regiment. 

Colonel  Harrison  participated  in  the  Atlanta  campaign 
and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Resaca,  where,  in 
charging  a  battery,  he  was  amongst  the  first  to  cross  the 
parapet.  He  also  assisted  in  the  capture  of  Cassville; 
was  engaged  at  New  Hope  Church,  and  commanded  his 
brigade  in  the  engagements  at  Gilgal  Church,  Kenesaw 
Mountain,  Peach-Tree  Creek,  and  Nashville.  After  the 
last-named.  Colonel  Harrison  was  occupied  in  the  pursuit 
of  Hood's  army,  and  through  many  difficulties  pene- 
trated as  far  as  Courtland,  Alabama.  He  was  then  or- 
dered to  report  to  General  Sherman  at  Savannah.  At 
Pocotaligo  he  was  assigned  to  a  brigade,  with  which  he 
joined  Sherman  at  Goldsborough. 

At  the  close  of  the  war  Colonel  Harrison  was  made 
brevet  brigadier-general  of  volunteers,  to  date  from  Jan- 
uary 23,  1865,  "for  ability  and  manifest  energy  and  gal- 
lantry in  command  of  the  brigade."  He  was  honorably 
mustered  out  of  service  at  Washington,  D.  C,  on  tin 
8th  day  of  June,  1 865,  and  at  once  entered  upon  his 
duties  as  reporter  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  State  of 
Indiana.  He  was  elected  United  States  Senator  in  1 88  I, 
and  held  that  office  for  six  years. 

In  ]88S  General  Harrison  became  the  Republican 
candidate  for  President  of  the  United  States.  He  was 
duly  elected,  and  took  his  seat  March  4,  1889,  which 
position  he  now  holds,  and  by  virtue  of  that  position 
became  commander-in-chief  of  the  army  ami  navy. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


189 


CAPTAIN    WILSON  T.   HARTZ,   U.S.A. 

Captain  Wilson  T.  Hartz  (Fifteenth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  County,  Pennsylvania,  Sep- 
tember 9,  1 S36 ;  received  an  academic  education;  em- 
barked in  life  as  a  civil  and  mining  engineer;  served 
about  one  year  at  mining  work,  and  then  received  an 
appointment  as  an  assistant  engineer  on  the  Mine  Hill 
and  Schuylkill  Haven  Railroad,  which  position  he  held 
tor  about  seven  years,  vacating  it  to  answer  the  call  of 
the  President  for  volunteers.  He  was  enrolled  on  the 
1 6th  day  of  April,  186 1  ;  mustered  into  service  and  ap- 
pointed sergeant-major  of  the  Sixth  Pennsylvania  Infan- 
try April  22,  1.S61  ;  and  was  mustered  out  of  service 
July  27,  1861.  He  was  then  appointed  first  lieutenant 
First  Regiment,  Excelsior  Brigade  (Seventieth  New 
York  volunteers),  August  30,  1S61  (Hooker's  Division, 
Third  Army  Corps),  mustered  to  date  October  22,  1861, 
and  was  adjutant  of  the  regiment  from  February  1,  1862, 
to  October  28,  1862,  part  of  the  time  on  duty  as  acting 
assistant  adjutant-general  of  the  brigade. 

October  IO,  1S62,  he  was  transferred  to  the  First  Army 
Corps  for  special  assignment  on  the  staff  of  General 
Nelson  Taylor;  was  appointed  captain  and  assistant 
adjutant-general  of  volunteers  October  23,  1862.  He 
received  a  bullet-wound  in  the  right  breast  at  Freder- 
icksburg, Virginia,  December  13,  1862;  was  assigned  to 
duty  as  assistant  to  the  commissary-general  of  prisoners 
February  17,  1863,  and  continued  on  that  duty  under  the 
several  administrative  heads  of  the  bureau — Generals 
Hoffman,  Wessells,  and  Hitchcock — until  the  office  was 
closed,  and  the  records  turned  over  to  the  adjutant- 
general  of  the  army,  August  22,  1S67. 

"Office  Commissary-Genf.rai,  of  Prisoners, 
" Washington,  I).  C,  August  22,  1S67. 

"  Special  Orders  :  In  compliance  with  an  order  of  the 
adjutant-general  of  the  20th  instant,  the  undersigned  an- 
nounces that  he  has  delivered  the  books,  papers,  and 
property  of  this  office  to  the  control  and  direction  of 
Brevet  Brigadier-General  Breck,  of  the  Adjutant-General's 
Department,  and  it  only  remains  for  him  to  tender  his 
thanks  to  the  gentlemen  in  the  office  for  their  uniform 
fidelity  and  industry. 

"  To  Brevet  Major  W.  T.  Hartz  he  feels  particularly 
indebted,  and  desires  to  make  his  acknowledgment  for 
his  services  and  experience  in  the  office,  which  have  been 
of  the  highest  value  and  importance,  not  merely  to  him- 
self individually,  but  to  the  government. 

(Signed)  "  E.  A.  Hitchcock, 

"  Major-General  of  Volunteers,  Com.-Gen.  Prisoners." 

Captain  Hartz  was  mustered  out  of  service  as  a  captain 
and  acting  adjutant-general  of  volunteers,  to  take  effect 
September  I,  1867.  He  was  commissioned  major  of 
volunteers  by  brevet  to  date  from   March   13,  1865,  "for 


faithful  and  meritorious  service  during  the  war."  He- 
then  entered  the  regular  service  as  second  lieutenant 
Fifteenth  U.  S.  Infantry,  to  date  from  May  11,  1866,  and 
was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant  June  17,  1867. 

He  was  commissioned  first  lieutenant  and  captain  by 
brevet  to  date  from  March  2,  1867,  "for  gallant  and 
meritorious  services  in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg,  Vir- 
ginia." On  being  mustered  out  of  volunteer  rank  as 
captain  ami  acting  adjutant-general,  he  joined  his  com- 
pany (D,  Fifteenth  Infantry)  at  Montgomery,  Alabama, 
and  commanded  the  company  (the  captain  being  absent) 
until  January  25,  1868,  when  he  was  ordered  to  duty  as 
acting  assistant  adjutant-general  of  the  District  of  Ala- 
bama, and  remained  on  that  duty  until  the  Fifteenth 
Infantry  left  the  State.  August  12,  1S68.  He  marched 
and  served  with  the  regiment  in  Texas  and  New  Mexico, 
on  company  and  post  duty  as  acting  assistant  quarter- 
master and  acting  commissar}-  of  subsistence ;  and  as 
engineer  officer  of  the  regiment  on  its  march  from  Texas 
to  New  Mexico  in  1869,  until  the  fall  of  1874,  when  he 
was  ordered  on  recruiting  duty  until  October,  1876.  He 
then  took  station  at  Fort  Wingate,  New  Mexico,  and 
was  promoted  captain  August  23,  1877. 

Captain  Hartz  was  on  detached  service,  building  can- 
tonment at  Bagosa  Springs,  Colorado,  during  the  winter 
of  1S7S-79;  he  was  in  the  Ute  campaign,  winter  of 
1879-80;  in  the  Victorio  campaign,  summer  and  fall 
of  1880;  escorting  engineers  Atchison,  Topeka,  anil 
Santa  Fe  Railroad,  winter  of  1880-81,  in  New  Mexico 
and  Arizona.  (  )n  leave  of  absence,  spring  of  1881  ; 
thence  to  recruiting  duty  (special  detail)  until  November, 
1 88 1  ;  joined  his  company  at  Fort  Lyon,  Colorado,  and 
served  continuously'  with  the  regiment  in  Colorado, 
North  Dakota,  Louisiana,  and  Illinois.  He  was  absent, 
with  leave  from  November  15,  1891,  to  Februaiy  29, 
1892,  and  has  been  on  duty  with  regiment  since. 


190 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


MAJOR  WILLIAM   L.  HASK1N,  U.S.A. 

Major  William  L.  Haskin  (First  Artillery)  was  born 
at  Iloulton,  Maine,  May  31,  1S41.  lie  is  the  son  of  the 
late  Brevet  Brigadier-General  Joseph  A.  Haskin,  U.S  A  . 
and  is  a  graduate  of  the  Rensselaer  Polytechnic  Institute 
of  Troy,  New  York,  Class  of  1 861,  with  the  degree  of 
Civil  Engineer.  He  entered  the  regular  service  from  civil 
life  as  second  lieutenant,  First  Artillery,  August  5,  1861, 
and  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  the  same  day.  He 
served  during  the  war  of  the  Rebellion, being  stationed  at 
Fort  Washington,  Maryland,  to  November,  1 861,  and  was 
then  ordered  to  Fort  Pickens,  Florida,  where  he  remained 
until  the  occupation  of  Pensacola,  Florida  He  was 
stationed  at  Pensacola  until  July,  1S62,  and  then  served 
in  the  Department  of  the  Gulf,  Louisiana,  until  August, 
1864.  lie  participated  in  the  campaigns  pertaining  to 
that  locality,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Fort  Bis- 
land,  April  12  and  [3,  1863;  in  a  skirmish  at  Jennerets, 
April  14,  1863;  in  the  siege  of  Port  Hudson,  Louisiana, 
from  May  27  to  July  8,  1863.  He  commanded  Horse 
Battery  F,  Firsl  Artillery,  during  the  second  Red  River 
campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  a  skirmish  at  Marksville, 
Louisiana,  May  15,  1864,  and  in  the  action  of  Mansura, 
Louisiana,  May  [6,  1864,  for  which  he  was  honorably 
mentioned  to  the  Secretary  of  War  by  General  Emory, 
in  the  following  words : 

"Lieutenant  Haskin  commanded  a  hatter}- of  the  First 
Artillery  in  the  Red  River  campaign  of  [ 864,  and  greatly 
distinguished  himself  by  the  good  order  and  discipline  of 


his  batter\-,  and  his  gallantry  and  coolness  upon  all  occa- 
sions; but  particularly  on  the  16th  of  May,  at  the  battle 
of  Mansura,  where  he  acted  with  conspicuous  gallantry. 
I,  therefore,  respectfully  recommend  that  he  be  brevetted 
captain  of  artillery,  to  date  from  May  16,  1864."  At 
the  close  of  the  war  he  was  brevetted  captain  (July-  8, 
1863)  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services  in  the  capture 
of  Port  Hudson,  Louisiana;"  and  brevet  major,  March 
13,  1865,  for  "good  conduct  and  gallant  services  during 
the  war." 

In  September,  1864,  Lieutenant  Haskin  was  placed 
on  recruiting  service,  and  in  February,  1865,  was  ap- 
pointed aide-de-camp  to  General  J.  A.  Haskin,  chief  of 
artillery  Twenty-second  Arm}-  Corps.  In  the  following 
September  he  was  ordered  to  Fort  Trumbull,  Connec- 
ticut, and  there  performed  the  duties  of  acting  assistant 
quartermaster  and  assistant  commissary  of  subsistence 
until  June,  1866,  when  he  was  sent  with  his  battery  to 
Malone,  New  York,  to  assist  in  suppressing  the  Fenian 
raid. 

Lieutenant  Haskin  was  promoted  captain  July  2S,  1866, 
and  was  at  Fort  Schuyler  until  1S70,  when  he  was  again 
sent  to  Malone,  New  York,  in  May,  to  assist  in  suppress- 
ing the  second  Fenian  raid  into  Canada.  He  was  then 
stationed  at  various  posts  011  the  Atlantic  coast  until  1876, 
when  he  was  sent  with  his  batter}-  to  South  Carolina  and 
Florida,  dining  the  contested  election  of  that  year.  He 
was  also  sent  to  Pittsburgh  and  Reading,  Pennsylvania, 
in  1877,  during  the  labor  riots. 

Captain  Ilaskin's  station  was  changed  to  the  Pacific 
coast  in  1  88 1,  and  he  served  at  different  posts  until  Sep- 
tember, 1 888,  when  he  was  in  charge  of  the  office  of 
inspector-general,  and  inspector  of  target  practice  of  the 
Department  of  California,  in  October,  1888.  He  was 
senior  member  of  a  board  for  reconnoissance  of  certain 
harbors  on  the  Pacific  coast  from  March  to  May,  i88y, 
and  commanded  a  battalion  of  light  artillery  at  a  summer 
encampment  from  Jul}-  to  September,  [889.  He  next 
served  at  Alcatraz  Island,  harbor  of  San  Francisco,  and 
then  at  other  unimportant  stations  to  the  present  time. 

Captain  Haskin  was  promoted  major  of  the  First  Ar- 
tillery August  11,  1887,  and  is  now  (Ala}-,  1892)  in  com- 
mand of  Fort  Columbus,  New  York,  and  is  the  Secretary 
of  the  Military  Service  Institution  of  the  Unfted  States, 
and  one  of  the  editors  of  its   journal. 

He  is  the  author  of  the  "  History  of  the  First  United 
States  Artillery,"  [879. 


WHO    SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


191 


CAPTAIN  CHARLES  HAY,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Charles  Hay  (Subsistence  Department)  was 
born  in  Holmes  Count}-,  Ohio,  August  23,  1840,  and  is, 
at  the  date  of  this  record  and  portrait,  in  the  fifty-second 
year  of  his  aye,  and  thirtieth  of  military  service. 

He  first  entered  the  service  by  enlistment  at  Cleveland, 
Ohio,  .April  23,  1861,  for  three  months  in  the  Eighth  Ohio 
Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served  as  a  private;  and,  imme- 
diately on  the  expiration  of  this  term,  on  July  24,  1861, 
he  enlisted  at  Camp  Chase,  Columbus,  Ohio,  in  the 
Twenty-third  Ohio  Volunteer  Infantry  for  three  years, — 
serving  the  full  term  in  the  ranks  as  a  private,  corporal, 
and  regimental  commissary  sergeant.  With  the  exception 
of  about  three  months  in  [862,  his  service  with  this  regi- 
ment was  in  West  Virginia,  where  it  performed  consid- 
erable scouting  and  marching,  and  had  many  minor 
engagements  with  the  rebels,  in  nearly  all  of  which  he 
participated.  August  to  October,  1862,  his  regiment  was 
with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  in  the  campaign  through 
Maryland  which  culminated  in  the  battles  of  South  Moun- 
tain and  Antietam,  in  both  of  which  he  was  engaged.  In 
the  summer  of  1863  he  took  part  with  his  regiment  in 
pursuing  and  intercepting  the  rebel  raider,  General  John 
Morgan,  in  Pastern  Ohio;  and  in  June,  1864,  was  in 
General  Hunter's  campaign  against  Lynchburg,  Virginia, 
which  resulted  disastrously,  the  Federal  troops  being 
obliged  to  retreat  to  the  Kanawha  Valley,  a  distance  of 
over  two  hundred  miles,  through  an  unfriendly  country 
and  harassed  by  the  rebels,  suffering  many  hardships 
and  privations  because  of  insufficient  supplies  and  a 
forced  march  of  eleven  days. 

In  May,  1864,  Captain  Hay  passed  examination  at 
Washington  City  before  the  board  presided  over  by  Gen- 
eral Silas  Casey  for  a  commission  in  the  colored  forces, 
and  subsequently,  in  July,  1864,  was  commissioned  a 
captain  in  the  Forty-fifth  Regiment  U.  S.  Colored  Volun- 
teer Infantry,  but  declined  the  appointment. 

Discharged  by  reason  of  expiration  of  service,  July 
24,  1864,  he  entered  the  office  of  the  provost-marshal  of 
the  Fourteenth  (  )hio  District,  at  Wooster,  as  a  deputy, 
where  he  remained  until  February  20,  1865,  when  he  was 
commissioned  a  captain  in  the  First  Army  Corps  of 
Veteran  Volunteer  Infantry,  then  being  organized  by 
General  Hancock  from  volunteer  soldiers  who  had  served 
two  years  or  more  and  been  honorably  discharged. 
After  two  months  of  recruiting  duty  in  Ohio  for  the 
corps,  he  joined  it  at  Washington  City,  and  was  assigned 
to  the  Fifth  Regiment ;  and  remained  in  camp  near 
Washington  until  July,  being  present  on  duty  with  his 
regiment  during  the  trial  and  execution  of  the  Surratt 
conspirators.  His  remaining  service  with  this  regiment 
was  at  Providence,  Rhode  Island,  and  on  Staten  and 
Hart's  Islands,  New  York  harbor,  until  discharged  May 
28,  1866.     Returning  to  Ohio,  he  entered  the  post-office 


at  Wooster  as  deputy,  where  he  remained  until  March, 
1867,  when  he  was  commissioned  a  second  lieutenant  in 
the  Thirty-sixth  U.  S.  Infantry,  reporting  for  duty  May 
1,  1867,  at  North  Platte,  Nebraska.  For  the  next  two 
years  he  served  with  this  regiment  at  posts  and  in  the 
field  in  the  vicinity  of  the  line  of  the  LTnion  Pacific  Rail- 
road, then  being  constructed,  protecting  its  workmen  in 
what  was  then  a  hostile  Indian  country.  At  the  reduc- 
tion in  1S69  of  the  infantry  of  the  ami)'  from  forty-five 
to  twenty-five  regiments,  he  was  placed  on  "  waiting 
orders,"  and  so  remained  until  Jul)',  when  he  was  as- 
signed to  the  Twenty-third  Infantry,  and,  conducting  a 
detachment  of  recruits  from  Carlisle  Barracks  to  San 
Francisco  in  August,  reported  for  duty  September  1  at 
Boise  Barracks,  Idaho,  where  he  served  until  after  his 
promotion  to  first  lieutenant  January,  1871,  during  which 
he  performed  considerable  escort  duty  in  Idaho  and  Ore- 
gon. His  subsequent  service  of  eighteen  years  in  the 
Twenty-third  Infantry  was  at  posts  in  ( )regon,  Washing- 
ton, and  Arizona  Territories,  Nebraska,  Kansas,  Indian 
Territory,  Colorado,  Texas,  and  at  Buffalo,  New  York, 
and  comprised  all  of  the  garrison  duties  incidental  to  a 
subaltern  line  officer,  of  which,  however,  those  of  post- 
adjutant,  quartermaster,  and  commissar)'  were  most  fre- 
quent and  almost  constant.  His  last  duty  as  post-quar- 
termaster was  the  entire  rebuilding  of  Fort  Porter,  at 
Buffalo,  New  York. 

On  December  10,  1888,  Captain  Hay  was  nominated 
by  President  Cleveland  for  commissary  of  subsistence 
with  the  rank  of  captain,  and  was  confirmed  January  15, 
1889. 

In  September  following  he  reported  for  duty  at  Denver, 
Colorado,  where  he  is  at  present  stationed  as  purchasing 
commissar)'  of  subsistence. 

Captain  Hay  is  a  member  of  the  Loyal  Legion,  Com- 
mandery  of  Colorado. 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  is* 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL   WILLIAM   B.    HAZEN,  U.S.A. 

( ASI  l>). 

Brigadiek-Genekal  William  B.  Hazen  was  born 
in  Vermont,  and  graduated  from  the  Military  Acadeni) 
|uly  i,  1855.  He  was  promoted  brevel  sei  ond  lieutenant 
of  infantry  the  ame  day,  and  second  lieutenanl  Eighth 
Infantry  September  4,    [ S5 5-     ''''    '"'"'    served    on    the 

I '.K  Hi Lst,  and  was  engaged  in  skirmishes  at  Applegate 

Creek  fanuar)  5,  and  Big  Kanyon  February  12,  [856. 
He  was  then  employed  in  conducting  Rogue  Rivei 
Indians  to  Grand  Ronde  Reservation,  Oregon,  the  same 
year.  He  was  on  leave  of  absence  and  awaiting  orders 
from  April  to  December,  [857.  He  rejoined  in  Texas, 
and  was  scouting  against  Apache  Indians  in  [858,  being 
1  ngaged  in  a  I  irmish  at  Guadalupe  Mountains  fune  [4. 
In  1859  he  wa  ;  1  ngaged  with  Kickapoo  Indians  on  the 
Nueces,  Maj  16  and  Octobei  5,  and, with  Comanche 
Indians  on  the  Vanno  November  5,  when  he  was  severely 
wounded,  and  went  on  sick-leave  of  absence  from  1859 
to  [861.     He  was  brevetted  first  lieutenant  May  [6,1859, 

for  "gallant  conduct  in  two  several   engagei ts  with 

Indians  in  Texa 

Lieutenant  I  lazen  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  April  1, 
[861,  while  assistant  instructor  of  infantr)  tactics  at  the 
Military  Academy.  He  was  promoted  captain  May  1  |, 
1 861,  and  upon  being  relieved  at  the  Militarj  Academy, 
September  [8,  1 861,  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Forty- 
fii  t  <  )hii  1  Volunteers,  and,  after  recruiting  and  organizing 
his  regiment  at  Cleveland,  wa  engaged  in  the  defence 
ol  the  Ohio  frontier,  and  in  operations  in  Kentucky  to 
February,  1862,  when  he  commanded  a  brigade  in  the 
Army  of  the  Ohio,  and  participated  in  the  Tenn< 
1  ampaign,  being  engagi  d  in  the  battle  of  Shiloh,  April  7, 
id  the  advance  on  Corinth.  I  [e  was  then  on  sick- 
leave  from  May  :-5  to  July  4,  1862,  when  he  returned, and 
was  engaged  with   his  troops  in   repairing  railroads   to 


August  4.  After  commanding  at  Murfreesborough  for 
awhile,  he  participated  in  the  retrograde  movement  on 
Louisville,  Kentucky,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battle  of 
Pei  ry\  ille  a\m\  se\  eral  skirmishes. 

Colonel  Hazen  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of 
volunteers  November  29,  1862,  and  participated  in  the 
Tenn<  s  iee  1  ampaign  with  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland, 
being  engaged  in  a  skirmish  near  Murfreesborough  on 
Christmas  Hay,  and  battle  ol  Stone  River  December  31, 
[862.  After  a  short  leave  of  absence,  General  Hazen 
participated  in  the  Tennessee  campaign  of  1863,  and  the 
campaigns  which  followed,  including  the  march  to  the 
sea,  .mil  through  the  Carolinas,  to  the  close  of  the  war. 
He  was  engaged  in  numerous  skirmishes,  and  in  the 
battle  of  Chickamauga  September  19  and  20,  1863;  in 
operations  about  Chattanooga,  in  a  movement  with  fifty 
two  pontoons  to  Brown's  Ferry,  with  which  a  bridge 
ai  ro  :s  the  Tennessee  River  was  formed,  Lookout  Valley 
seized  after  a  severe  skirmish,  and  the  line  oi  supplies  oi 
the  army  reopened.  He  captured  the  Nineteenth  Ala- 
bama Regiment  atOrchard  Knob  November  23, and  was 
in  the  battle  of  Missionary  Ridge  November  25,  [863. 
I  [e  wa  1 1  ngaged  also  in  the  demonstration  against  Rocky- 
face  Ridge,  battle  of  Resaca,  action  at  Adairsville,  at 
Cassville,  at  Pickett's  Mills,  battle  of  Kenesaw  Mountain, 
combat  of  Peach  tree  Creek,  siege  of  Atlanta,  and,  while 
in  command  of  the  Second  Division,  Fifteenth  Army 
<  'orp  ,  engaged  in  the  battle  of  [onesborough,  the  march 
to  the  sea,  including  numerous  skirmishes,  assault  and 
capture  of  Fort   McAllister,  near  Savannah. 

While  en  route  through  the  Carolinas,  General  Hazen 
constructed,  with  his  troops,  a  trestle-bridge  twelve 
hundred  feet  long,  in  eighteen  hours,  over  Lynch's 
('reel.,  February  28,  1865,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battle 
of  Bentonville,  North  Carolina,  March  20-21,  1865,  and 
was  present  at  the  surrender  of  fohnston's  army  April  26, 
1865.  He  was  appointed  major-general  oi  volunteers 
December  i;,  [864,  and  was  brevetted  in  the  regular 
army  from  major  to  major-general,  for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious services  in  the  various  general  actions  in  which  he 

had  been  engaged. 

After  holding  several  important  commands,  anion;; 
them  the  command  of  the  Fifteenth  Army  Corps  during 
1865—66,  he  wa-  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service 
January  15,  [866,  and  then  was  a  member  of  the  Board 
ol  Officers  to  Recommend  Brevet  Promotions,  lie  was 
appointed  colonel  of  the  Thirty  eighth  Infantry  July  28, 
[866,  and  while  on  duty  in  the  West  was  transferred  to 
the  Sixth  Infantry,  upon  the  consolidation  of  regiments 
in  1869.  He  then  served  at  various  posts  in  the  West 
with  that  regiment  until  December  15,  1880,  when  he 
was  appointed  brigadiei  general  and  chief  signal-officer, 
and  stationed  at  Washington,  D.  C,  at  which  place  he 
died  January  u>,  1 887. 


WHO   SERVED    IX    THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


193 


G  >LONEL  CLEMENT   D.  HEBB,  U.S.M.C. 

Colonel  Clemeni  I  >.  Hebb  was  born  in  Virginia, 
but  was  appointed  a  second  lieutenant  in  the  Marine 
Corps  of  the  United  Slates,  from  California,  March,  [856. 
Alter  going  through  his  preliminary  training  at  head 
quarters,  and  at  the  marine  barracks  .it  Philadelphia, 
where  a  large  force  of  marines  was  always  then  kept,  he 
was  ordered  in  command  ol  the  marine  guard  of  the 
sloop-of-war  "  Falmouth,"  and  served  in  the  Brazil  foi 
three  years,  During  the  year  [859  he  was  alia,  lied  to 
the  "Preble,"  of  the  Paraguay  Expedition.  After  re 
turning  from  the  South  American  Station,  Lieutenant 
Ilehh  served  at  head- quarters ;  at  marine  barracks,  New 
York;  at  marine  barracks,  Pensacola ;  and  at  head- 
quarters again  in  [860-61.  These  were  trying  times,  and 
people  had  to  declare  their  sentiments  very  plainly. 
Lieutenant  Hebb  was  ordered,  with  a  detachment  of 
marines,  to  occupy  Fori  Washington,  on  the  Potomac, 
to  prevent  that  fort  from  falling  into  the  hands  "l  tin 
rebels.  In  fune,  1S61,  he  was  commissioned  a  first  lieu- 
tenant, and,  after  a  short  term  at  the  marine  barracks  at 
Boston,  was  ordered  to  the  frigate  "  Santee,"  ol  the  \\  e  1 
Gulf  Squadron.  He  was  promoted  to  captain  while  thus 
serving,  and,  being  detached,  served  at  the  marine  bar- 
racks at  Norfolk,  Virginia,  and  at  Philadelphia.  During 
a  portion  of  the  year  [865  he  served  with  the  battalion 
of  marine,  at  Morris  and  Folly  Islands,  South  Caro 
Una.  During  1864  and  [865  he  was  on  duty  at  New 
York,  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  and  at  Washing 
ton;  was  attached  to  the  flag  ship  "Colorado,"  of  the 
European  Squadron,  from  .April,  1865,  to  August, 
[867. 

Captain  Hebb  was,  after  this  date,  in  command  of  the 
marine  barracks  at  Washington;  the  marine  liana- I 
at  Mound  City;  and  again  at  Washington,  1 1.  C.  Thence 
he  went  to  the  marine  barracks  at  Boston,  and  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  1  011  in  land  of  the  marine  liar  rails  at  I'elisa- 
cola,  where  he  remained   from  October,  [869,  to  June, 


[872.  In  [872—73  he  was  stationed  al  Annapolis,  aftei 
wards  serving  in  the  flag-ship  "Pensacola,"  Pacifii 
Squadron.  From  July,  [874,  to  May,  1880,  he  com 
manded  marines  at  the  Marc   Island   Navy- Yard,  Cali- 

fi  H'lli.l. 

Commissioned    major    1876.       From    May,    1880,  to 
February,  1S.X5,  commanded   marines  at    Boston   Navy 
Yard;    commissioned    lieutenant-colonel     April,    18S0; 
commanded    marines    at    navy  yard,    Portsmouth,   New 
I  [ampshire,  1885,  to  Augu  1,  [889. 

Commissioned  colonel  August,  [889,  and  stationed  for 
a  lew  months  at  League  Island,  Philadelphia.  March 
1,  [890,  appointed  to  the  command  of  the  marine  bar- 
racks at  the  navy-yard,  Boston,  Massachusetts. 

Colonel  Hebb  was  ordered  by  the  Honorable  Secre- 
tary of  tin  Nav)  on  September  7,  [891,  to  Washington, 
I ).('.,  to  command  the  Marine  Corps  while  the  com- 
mandant (McCawley)  was  ick,  and  until  his  retirement 
and  successor  was  appointed  in  February,  1 89 1,  when 
he  returned  to  tin    Bo  ton  Marine  Barracks. 


25 


■94 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  secular) 


CAPTAIN  AND  BREVET  COLONEL   HENRY  B.   HEN- 
DERSHOTT,  U.S.A.  (retired). 

Captain  and  Brevet  Colonel  Henry  15.  Hender- 
SHOTT  was  born  at  Burlington,  Kentucky,  May  23,  1824. 
I  [e  was  graduated  at  the  United  States  Military  Academy 
in  the  Class  of  1 847,  and  was  assigned  as  a  brevet 
second  lieutenant  to  the  Fifth  U.S.  Infantry,  then  serving 
in  the  war  with  Mexico.  Shortly  after  graduation  he 
proceeded  to  join  his  regiment  at  the  seal  of  war  in  the 
City  ol  Mexico;  but,  owing  to  a  virulent  attack  of  yellow 
fever  in  the  Castle  of  San  Juan  d'Ulloa,  off  the  coast  of 
Vera  Cruz,  he  did  not  reach  his  command  until  late  in 
the  fall  of  1847.  Shortly  after  joining  his  regiment  he 
volunteered  his  services  to  act  with  a  large  force  then 
fitting  out  in  the  City  of  Mexico  by  General  Scott  to 
open  up  the  route  between  that  city  and  Vera  Cruz,  which 
was  then  infested  by  large  bands  of  guerillas  under  the 
noted  guerilla  chief  Padre  Jurata.  He  served  with  dis- 
tinction, and  was  highly  commended  by  his  commanding 
officer,  General  Daniel  Ruggles,  fifth  Infantry,  for  his 
services  on  this  occasion.  On  his  return  from  Vera  Cruz 
he  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  second  lieutenant  in  the 
Second  U.  S.  Infantry,  and  served  creditably  with  this 
regiment  until  the  close  of  the  war.  Immediately  after 
this  war,  his  regiment  being  ordered  t<>  California,  he 
accompanied  it  to  its  destination,  arriving  at  San  Fran- 
cisco on  July  9,  1849,  after  a  long  and  disastrous  voyage 
of  six  months,  via  Cape  Plorn.  On  his  arrival  in  Cali- 
fornia he  was  ordered  with  his  company  to  cantonment 
Par-West,  in  the  foot-hills  of  the  Sierra  Nevada,  in  the 
northern  part  of  California.  Whilst  at  this  station  he 
performed,  in  addition  to  the  duties  of  company  com- 
mander, all  the  staff  duties  incidental  to  a  post  command. 
While  at  Par- West  he  took  an  active  part  in  numerous 
engagements  with  hostile  Indians  in   the  Sierra    Nevada 


Mountains.  On  June  30,  1850,  he  was  promoted  to  a 
first  lieutenancy  in  his  regiment,  and  joined  his  com- 
mand, then  on  the  Great  Colorado  Desert,  en  route  to  the 
junction  of  the  Gila  and  Colorado  Rivers.  Here,  again, 
in  addition  to  his  line  command,  he  performed  those  of 
staff  duties,  and  selected,  with  the  approval  of  the  com- 
manding officer,  General  (then  major)  Samuel  P.  Heintzel- 
man,  the  present  site  of  Port  Yuma.  He  served  three 
years  at  Yuma,  and  during  this  time  was  an  active  par- 
ticipant in  many  engagements  against  hostile  Indians, 
notably  the  Yumas,  Cocopas,  Mohaves,  etc.  His  ser- 
vices at  this  station  were  most  arduous,  and  owing  to 
these  and  exposure  in  tents  to  the  heat  of  this  exces- 
sively hot  climate  for  nearly  three  years,  frequently  with 
an  inadequate  supply  of  provisions,  his  health  was  com- 
pletely broken  down.  In  the  winter  of  1854  he  was 
ordered,  with  the  officers  of  his  regiment,  to  the  Atlantic 
sea-board,  to  recruit  his  regiment.  After  three  months' 
recruiting  service,  we  find  him  again  in  active  field  ser- 
vice at  Ports  Ridgely  and  Randall,  then  in  the  Indian 
country. 

In  the  spring  and  summer  of  1859  he  served  in  a 
campaign  on  the  plains  with  W.  T.  Sherman's  battery 
against  hostile  Sioux  Indians ;  and  in  the  winter  of  that 
year  was  ordered  with  his  company  to  Fort  Leaven- 
worth, making  an  overland  march  of  nearly  six  hundred 
and  fifty  miles. 

It  was  while  stationed  at  Leavenworth  that  he  was 
transferred  to  the  Second  U.  S.  Artillery,  and  for  the 
first  time,  in  nearly  fifteen  years  of  hard  service,  availed 
himself  of  his  first  leave  of  absence.  It  was  on  his 
return  from  this  leave,  to  join  Barry's  battery  at  Leav- 
enworth, that  he  sustained  at  Hannibal,  Missouri,  serious 
and  painful  external  and  internal  injuries.  He  was  taken 
from  there  to  Jefferson  Barracks,  and  after  a  painful  and 
lingering  confinement  of  nearly  two  years  to  his  post 
and  quarters,  again  resumed  such  duties  as  he  was  able 
to  perform,  viz. :  Chief  commissary  Department  of  the 
West,  on  the  staff  of  General  Fremont;  superintendent 
of  the  recruiting  service  for  the  State  of  Iowa,  and  duty 
in  the  office  of  the  provost-marshal  general. 

Believing  that  his  usefulness  as  an  officer  for  active 
field  service  had  gone  by,  he  reluctantly  went  upon  the 
retired  list  near  the  close  of  the  war;  but  continued  to 
perform  such  duties  as  his  health  and  condition  would 
permit,  until  1  870,  when,  by  a  general  order,  all  retired 
officers  were  relieved  from  duty. 

He  was  successively  brevetted  a  major,  lieutenant- 
colonel,  and  colonel  for  faithful  service  during  the  war 
of  the  Rebellion.  He  was  also  appointed  Register  of  the 
Virginia  Land  Office. 

By  the  advice  of  his  medical  officer  he  took  up  his 
residence  at  Aiken,  South  Carolina,  where  he  now  re- 
sides, in  very  feeble  health. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


195 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL  AND  BREVET  COLONEL 
GUY  V.  HENRY,  U.S.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  and  Brevet  Colonel  Guy  V. 
Henry  was  born  at  Fort  Smith,  Indian  Territory,  March 
9,  1839.  lie  was  graduated  at  the  U.S.  Military  Acad- 
emy in  the  Class  of  1861,  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  war 
of  the  Rebellion,  and  assigned  as  a  second  lieutenant  to 
the  First  LT.  S.  Artillery.  He  served  with  distinction  in 
that  regiment  until  made  colonel  of  the  Fortieth  .Mas- 
sachusetts Infantry,  in  the  fall  of  1863,  and  continued 
throughout  the  war  with  that  command. 

The  attention  of  the  commanding  general  was  called 
"to  the  gallant  and  distinguished  services  of  Firsl 
Lieutenant  Guy  Y.  Henry"  in  the  battle  of  Pocotaligo, 
South  Carolina,  October  22,  1862,  and  again  to  the 
advance  led  by  Colonel  Henry,  of  the  Fortieth  Massa- 
chusetts Infantry,  into  Florida,  in  1864,  in  the  following 
words  by  General  Seymour:  "I  cannot  commend  too 
highly  the  brilliant  success  of  this  advance,  for  which 
great  credit  is  due  Colonel  Henry  and  his  command, 
and  1  earnestly  recommend  him  to  your  [General  Gill- 
mo  re's]  attentii  >n  as  a  most  deserving  and  energetic  officer." 
General  Seymour  again  complimented  <  !olonel  I  [enry, 
in  his  report  on  the  battle  of  Olustee,  as  follows: 
"Colonel  Henry  kept  his  cavalry  in  constant  activity, 
watching  and  neutralizing  that  of  the  enemy,  and  by 
important  and  gallant  services  before  and  after,  as  well 
as  during  the  battle,  was  eminently  useful.  I  desire  to 
recommend  him  to  you  [General  Gillmore]  as  a  highly 
deserving  officer." 

At  the  close  of  the  war,  when  Colonel  Henry  was 
mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service,  he  was  brevetted 
a  colonel  in  the  regular  army,  and  had  the  honor  con- 
ferred upon  him  of  being  made  a  brevet  brigadier-general 
of  volunteers. 

Since  the  war  Colonel  Henry  has  had  various  posi- 
tions of  trust  assigned  him  in  the  Indian  country  west  "I 
the  Missouri  River,  and  was  transferred  to  the  Third 
U.S.  Cavalry  in  1870,  reaching  the  grade  of  major  of  the 
Ninth  Cavalry  in  1 88 1.  While  in  the  cavalry  service 
he  has  not  only  endured  hard  campaign  duty,  but  has 
met  with  some  sad  misfortunes  while  in  the  performance 
of  it.  He  has  been  engaged  with  different  tribes  of 
Indians  in  Arizona,  Wyoming,  Utah,  Nebraska,  anil 
Dakota;  and  in  the  expedition  to  the  Black  Hills  in  the 
winter  of  1874  and  1875  he,  with  his  command,  was 
badly  frozen.  Notwithstanding  this  misfortune,  Colonel 
Henry  is  found  again  with  his  command  in  the  Big 
Horn  and  Yellowstone  expedition  of  1876,  where  he  was 
severely  wounded  through  the  face,  losing  the  use  of 
his  left  eye,  in  the  battle  of  Rosebud  Creek,  Montana. 
He  is  honorably  mentioned  in  General  Orders  by 
General  Crook  for  this  affair,  and  as  "carrying  on  his 
person    honorable    marks    of   distinction    in    the   severe 


0T 


wound  he  received  at  the  hands  of  the  enemy."  Before 
thoroughly  recovering  from  his  wounds,  he  is  found 
commanding  a  battalion  in  the  capture  of  Crazy  Horse 
Village  of  Sioux  Indians  in  1877. 

After  these  arduous  duties,  and  being  much  broken 
in  health,  Colonel  Henry  was  granted  leave  of  absence, 
and  made  an  extended  tour  through  Europe,  returning 
in  time,  however,  to  take  part  in  the  White  River  expe- 
dition from  September  to  December,  1879.  In  the  winter 
of  1890  he  commanded  the  Ninth  Cavalry  in  the  Sioux 
Indian  troubles  at  Pine  Ridge  Agency,  South  Dakota. 

In  addition  to  his  extensive  field  service.  Colonel 
Henry  was  an  instructor  at  the  Fort  Monroe  Artillery 
School  from  1867  to  1869;  was  a  member  of  an  artillery 
board  to  witness  experiments  with  heavy  guns  at  Fort 
Delaware  in  1868;  a  member  of  a  board  of  officers  to 
determine  and  fix  the  cavalry  accoutrements,  equipments, 
and  supplies  at  Fort  Leavenworth  in  1874;  and  member 
of  a  board  of  officers  to  determine  and  fix  on  cavalry 
accoutrements,  equipments,  and  supplies  at  Washington 
in  fuly,  18S2.  1  le  also  occupied  important  staff  positions 
during  and  since  the  war. 

Colonel  Henry  is  a  son  of  Major  William  Seaton 
Henry,  Third  U.  S.  Infantry,  and  grandson  of  Daniel 
D.  Tompkins,  who  was  twice  Governor  of  New  York 
and  Vice-President  of  the  United  States;  also  of  Smith 
Thompson,  who  was  Secretary  of  the  Navy  and  Judge 
of  the  Supreme  Court. 

Colonel  Henry  has  furnished  the  profession  with  the 
following  military  works:  "  Records  of  Civilian  Appoint- 
ments U.S.  Army,"  "Army  Catechism  for  Non-Commis- 
sioned  Officers  and  Soldiers,"  pamphlet  on  "  Target 
Practice,"  and  "  Practical  Information  for  Non-Commis- 
sioned  Officers  on  Field  Duty."  He  was  promoted  lieu- 
tenant-colonel Seventh  Cavalry  January  30,  1892,  and 
is  in  command  at  Fort  Myer,  Virginia. 


196 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARJfV  AXD   NA1T  [regular) 


MAJOR  JAMES  HENTON,   U.S.A. 

Major  James  Henton  (Twenty-third  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Liverpool,  England,  February  2,  [835.  He 
enlisted  in  the  Sixth  U.  S.  Infantry  November  22,  [853, 
and  served  at  Jefferson  Barracks  and  Fort  Riley,  Kansas, 
until  August,  1S54,  when  he  marched  with  his  company 
to  Fort  Laramie,  then  in  Nebraska  Territory  reaching 
that  post  in  the  subsequent  (  >ctober,  where  he  remained 
until  June  2j,  1857.  During  this  period  he  took  part  in 
several  expeditions,  under  General  Harney,  against  the 
Sioux  and  Cheyenne  Indians,  lie  participated  in  the 
expedition  against  the  Cheyennes,  under  Colonel  E.  V. 
Sumner,  and  was  engaged  in  the  action  at  Solomon's 
Fork  July  29,  1857.  On  the  breaking  up  of  this  expe- 
dition he  accompanied  several  companies  of  his  regiment 
to  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  and  did  duty  in  that  \  icinity 
as  posse  comitates  during  the  political  disturbances  of  that 
period,  until  April,  [858,  when  he  left  that  post  with  his 
entire  regiment  as  part  of  the  Mormon  expedition,  under 
General  Albeit  Sidney  Johnston.  In  August,  1858,  when 
this  expedition  was  over,  he  marched  with  his  regiment 
overland  to  Benicia  Barracks,  California,  reaching  the 
destination  about  the  6th  of  the  following  November, 
and  on  the  22d  of  the  latter  month  he  received  his 
discharge  for  expiration  of  term  of  service,  having  been 
previously  promoted  corporal,  sergeant,  and  first  sergeant. 

He  re-enlisted  at  Newport  Barracks,  Kentucky,  and 
became  a  lance-sergeant  of  the  Permanent  Party.  In 
December,  [860,  he  was  detached  and  placed  in  charge 
of  a  recruiting  rendezvous  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  under 
First  Lieutenant  J.  D.  O'Connell,  Second  Infantry.  In 
September,  1 861,  he  was  transferred  and  made  first  ser- 
geant of  Company  A,  Second  Battalion,  Fourteenth  In- 
fantry, at  Fort  Trumbull.  The  regiment  was  transferred  to 
Perryville,  Man-land,  soon  afterwards,  and  while  there 
he  was  appointed  second  lieutnant  hum  <  >ctobei'5,  [861. 


In  March,  1862,  Lieutenant  Henton,  with  his  regiment, 

proceeded  to  Washington,  D.  C,  and  formed  part  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac,  participating  in  the  campaigns  of 
that  army  until  August,  1863, being  engaged  in  the  siege 
of  Yorktown,  and  in  the  battles  of  Gaines'  Mill,  Mal- 
vern Hill,  second  Bull  Run,  Antietam,  Snicker's  Gap, 
Fredericksburg,  Chancellorsville,  and  Gettysburg. 

From  September,  1863,  to  March,  1865,  he  was  de- 
tached on  recruiting  service,  but  rejoining  his  regiment  at 
tin  latter  date,  in  the  field,  he  participated  in  the  operatii >ns 
terminating  with  the  surrender  of  General  Lee,  and  at 
the  close  of  the  war  was  brevetted  captain  "  for  gallant 
and  meritorious  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania." 

After  a  short  tour  of  duty  as  provost  guard  in  the 
city  of  Richmond,  the  regiment  was  concentrated  at 
Hart  Island,  New  York,  preparatory  to  moving  to  the 
Pacific  coast.  While  at  this  station  Lieutenant  Henton 
was  appointed  adjutant  of  the  Second  Battalion  of  the 
Fourteenth  Infantry,  and  in  that  capacity  proceeded,  on 
the  [6th  oi  August,  1865,  to  San  Francisco,  California, 
via  the  Isthmus  of  Panama,  reaching  the  former  place  on 
the  9th  of  the  following  September,  but  was  transferred 
to  Port  Vancouver,  Washington,  at  which  post  he  per- 
formed the  duties  of  adjutant  until  promoted  captain, 
November  4,  1865,  but  did  not  join  his  company  until 
March,  1866,  at  which  time  he  was  relieved  as  adjutant, 
and  took  station  at  Fort  Cape  Disappointment,  but  soon 
afterwards  was  ordered  to  Port  Boise,  Idaho.  Dur- 
ing the  year  [866  the  Second  Battalion  of  the  Four- 
teenth Infantry  became,  under  the  reorganization  law, 
the  Twenty-third  Infantry. 

In  October,  1866,  Captain  Henton's  station  was  changed 
to  Camp  Warner,  Oregon,  at  which  point  some  field  ser- 
vice was  had,  under  General  Crook,  against  the  Piute  and 
other  Indians.  He  was  then  transferred  to  Arizona  with 
his  company  in  June,  1872,  but  was  detailed  on  recruiting 
service  in  New  York  City*  from  January,  1873,  to  (  )ctober, 
[874.  Rejoining  his  company  at  Fort  Omaha  in  April, 
1875,  then  moving  to  Fort  Dodge,  Kansas,  he  served  there 
and  at  Port  Hays  and  Fort  Supply  to  1880.  In  May  of 
this  year  he  participated  in  General  Mackenzie's  expe- 
dition against  the  Ute  Indians. 

After  serving  at  Uncompahgre  Cantonment,  and  at 
Port  Union,  New  Mexico,  Captain  Henton  was  trans- 
ferred with  his  regiment  to  Michigan  in  18S4,  and  he 
took  station  at  Fort  Brady,  where  he  was  in  command 
until  May,  180,0,  when  the  regiment  was  transferred  to 
Texas,  the  captain  being  ordered  to  Fort  Davis,  reaching 
that  place  May  [4,  1890. 

Captain  Henton  was  promoted  major  January  31,1 89 1 , 
and  assigned  to  the  Twenty  third  Infantry,  and  in  May, 
1892,  moved  therefrom,  in  command  of  B  and  D  com- 
panies, to  Port  Bliss,  Texas,  his  present  station. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


197 


CAPTAIN  AND    BREVET   MAJOR  FRANK   W.   HESS, 

U.S.A. 

Captain  and  Brevet  Major  Frank  W.  Hess  (Third 
Artillery)  was  bom  in  Fulton  Count)-,  Pennsylvania, 
December  15,  1X36.  He  was  educated  in  the  common 
schools  of  his  count}-,  at  Milnwood  Academy  in  Hunt- 
ingdon Count}-,  and  at  Shryock's  school  in  Chambers- 
burg,  Pennsylvania.  He  taught  school  and  studied  law, 
and  was  thus  engaged  when  the  war  of  the  Rebellion 
commenced.  He  joined  one  of  the  companies  that  re- 
sponded to  the  first  call  for  troops  as  it  passed  through 
the  village  where  he  was  teaching.  On  arrival  at  the 
rendezvous  men  enough  had  joined,  while  en  route,  to 
make  two  companies.  Of  one  he  was  made  captain,  and 
ordered  to  duty  with  General  Patterson's  column  in  t he- 
valley  of  Virginia,  lie  was  honorably  discharged,  with 
this  company  in  August,  1861,  and  re-entered  the  service 
as  a  lieutenant  in  the  Third  Penn.  Cavalry  in  Sept.,  ami 
served  with  it  during  the  remainder  of  the  war,  being 
honorably  mustered  out  in  Aug,  1865,  as  its  major. 

He  participated  in  thirty-eight  battles  and  skirmishes. 
(For  names  of  these,  see  "  Powell's  Record  of  Living 
Officers.")  He  was  appointed  a  first  lieutenant  in  the 
Eleventh  Infantry  February  23,  1866,  and  transferred  in 
that  year  to  the  Twenty-ninth.  In  1870  he  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  artillery  arm,  and  assigned  to  the  Third 
Regiment,  in  which  he  attained  his  captaincy  in   1886. 

lie  was  stationed  in  Texas  during  the  reconstruction 
period,  and  served  as  mayor  of  the  city  of  Marshall  and 
military  commissioner  of  Harrison  Count)-,  and  made 
decisions  in  man\-  important  cases  of  litigation,  perform- 
ing the  delicate  and  difficult  duties  of  a  civil  office  so  as 
to  meet  the  approval  of  his  superiors  and  gain  the  friend- 
ship of  all  law-abiding  citizens. 

Of  his  services,  in  the  report  of  the  operations  of  his 


brigade  at  Malvern  Hill,  General  Warren  say: 


Lieu- 


tenant Hess,  of  the  cavalry,  reported  to  me  with  a  pla- 
toon, was  pushed  forward  till  the  enemy's  pickets  were 
reached.  Throughout  the  day  he  continued  to  observe 
the  enemy  in  front,  while  the  fierce  battle  was  going  on 
to  our  right,  and  rendered  most  valuable  service." 

This  day  was  spent  under  a  severe  shell-fire  from  our 
own  gun-boats  in  the  river,  which  were  attempting  to 
reach  the  enemy  over  the  heads  of  this  little  command, 
in  which  one  man  and  several  horses  were  killed. 

General  Averell,  reporting  the  result  of  a  reconnoissance 
to  and  fight  at  White-Oak-Swamp  Bridge,  August  5, 
1862,  says:  "I  am  particularly  indebted  to  Lieutenant 
Hess,  Third  Pennsylvania  Cavalry,  my  acting  aide  on  the 
occasion,  for  his  readiness  in  carrying  orders  and  placing 
the  squadrons  and  guns  in  position." 

In  a  letter  to  the  Secretary  of  War,  General  George 
G.  Meade,  commanding  Army  of  the  Potomac,  says  : 
"  Major  Hess  served  as  major  of  the  Third  Pennsylvania 


Cavalry  whilst  that  regiment  was  on  duty  at  the  head- 
quarters of  the  arm)-.  During  this  period  it  was  fre- 
quently called  on  by  me  to  perform  picket,  scouting,  and 
other  duties,  giving  me  an  opportunity  to  become  per- 
sonally acquainted  with  the  manner  in  which  Major 
Hess  discharged  his  duties.  I  take  pleasure  in  stating 
that  he  was  active,  intelligent,  and  faithful,  and  recom- 
mend him  for  appointment  in  the  regular  army." 

General  George  P.  Buell,  on  the  10th  of  August,  1868, 
in  a  letter  to  the  War  Department,  says  of  him  :  "  He  is 
one  of  the  most  efficient  officers  of  the  regriment  of  Food 
education,  zealous  in  discharge  of  his  duty,  proud  of  his 
profession,  and  deeply  attached  to  his  country." 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Owen,  who  commanded  the  Third 
Pennsylvania  Cavalry  in  the  Antietam  campaign,  in  a 
letter  to  the  adjutant-general,  said  :  "Captain  Hess  dis- 
tinguished himself  by  his  sound  judgment  and  personal 
bravery,  and  at  all  times  by  his  fidelity  to  the  interests  of 
the  service.  At  Antietam,  when  Hooker  was  wounded 
and  his  command  repulsed,  Captain  Hess  was  one  of  the 
last  to  leave  the  field,  and  principally  through  his  exer- 
tions a  section  of  artillery  was  removed  when  the  enemy 
were  within  a  few  yards  of  it." 

General  J.  B.  Mcintosh  says,  in  an  official  paper:  "I 
can  testify  to  his  gallant  conduct  in  every  action  in  which 
his  regiment  was  engaged." 

General  A.  S.  Webb  said,  October  31,  1868,  to  the 
adjutant-general  of  the  army:  "Major  Hess,  when  on 
duty  with  his  regiment  at  head-quarters  of  the  Army  of 
the  Potomac,  was  specially  commended  by  Major-Gen- 
eral Meade,  commanding  that  army,  and  by  myself  as 
chief  of  staff,  for  distinguished  gallantry,  enterprise,  and 
zeal  in  opening  communications  between  corps  in  the 
vicinity  of  Hatcher's  Run.  General  Meade  will  sanction 
this  use  of  his  name,  since  this  was  not  the  only  occasion 
on  which  Major  Hess  distinguished  himself." 


198 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular, 


COLONEL-COMMANDANT  CHARLES   HEYWOOD, 
U.S.M.C. 

Colonel-Commandant  Charles  Heyvvood  was  burn 
in  Maine,  [839;  appointed  from  New  York,  April,  1858. 
At  the  marine  barracks,  at  Washington,  and  at  Brook- 
lyn, during  that  year,  and  served  in  the  quarantine 
riots  at  Staten  Island.  On  special  duty  in  "  Niagara," 
and  in  "St.  Louis,"  of  Home  Squadron,  looking  after 
the  filibusters,  under  Walker.  Invalided  from  Aspin- 
wall,  January,  i860.  Afterwards  ordered  to  sloop-of- 
war  "Cumberland,"  flag-ship  "I  Squadron  of  Observa- 
tion, at  Vera  Cruz.  In  March,  [861,  the  "Cumberland" 
returned  to  Hampton  Km. ids,  and  there  at  the  time  of 
the  destruction  of  the  Norfolk  Navy- Yard.  Heywood 
was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant  May,  1861  ;  landed  with 
marines  at  Hatteras  Inlet,  ami  present  at  the  capture  of 
Forts  Clark  and  1  latter. is. 

Promoted  to  captain  in  the  Marine  Corps  November, 
1S61  ;  on  a  number  of  boat  expeditions  in  the  lames 
River  during  winter  of  1861-62;  was  on  board  the 
"  Cumberland"  during  the  fight  with  the  ram  "  Merri- 
mac"  and  consorts,  March  8,  1862,  and  most  favorably 
mentioned  for  gallant  conduct.  For  some  time  alter  this 
Captain  Heywood  was  actively  employed,  both  on  shore 
and  in  the  search  for  the  "Alabama,"  and  then  applied 
for  duty  on  board  the  flag  ship  "Hartford,"  and  was 
ordered  as  licet  marine  offii  1  r  of  West  Gulf  Squadron; 
served  with  the  marines  on  shore,  at  Pensacola.  On 
board  the  "  Hartford"  at  the  battle  of  Mobile  Bay.  Had 
command  of  two  nine  inch  guns,  and  was  favorably 
mentioned. 

Commanded  Fort  Powell,  after  its  capture;  marine 
barracks,  Brooklyn,  and  Recruiting  Rendezvous  Phila- 
delphia, [865  ;  brevi  ts  of  major  and  lieutenant-colonel  for 
distinguished  gallantry  in  the  presence  of  the  enemy. 


Ordered  to  command  of  marine  barracks,  navy-yard, 
Washington,  1865  ;  fleet  marine  officer  under  Admiral 
Farragut,  European  Station,  1867;  command  of  marine 
barracks  at  Washington,  and  at  Norfolk;  and  fleet 
marine  officer  of  the  North  Atlantic  Squadron.  In  Jan- 
uary, 1X74,  was  attached  to  the  flag-ship  "Wabash," 
and  commanded  the  marines  during  all  the  shore  drills 
carried  on  by  the  navy  at  Key  West  and  elsewhere. 
Was  attached  to  the  marine  barracks  at  Brooklyn,  when, 
in  June,  1874,  he  was  ordered  to  New  Orleans  to  report 
to  Admiral  Mullany,  as  fleet  marine  officer  of  the  North 
Atlantic  Station;  was  attached  to  that  admiral's  staff 
during  the  troubles  of  that  year  in  New  Orleans.  After 
serving  in  the  "Worcester"  and  the  "Hartford,"  was 
detached,  and  again  ordered  to  Brooklyn  Barracks,  in 
September,  [876. 

In  November,  1876,  he  attained  the  substantive  rank 
of  major,  to  which  he  had  been  brcvetted  more  than 
ten  years  before,  and  ordered  to  command  the  marine 
barracks  at  Washington.  In  July  and  August,  1877, 
had  command  of  a  battalion  of  marines  at  Baltimore, 
Philadelphia,  and  at  Reading,  Pennsylvania,  during  the 
very  serious  labor  riots  of  that  summer.  Honorably 
mentioned  by  General  Hancock,  who  was  in  general 
command.  The  state  of  the  battalion  for  efficiency, 
neatness,  and  general  soldierly  bearing  was  commented 
upon  by  all  who  were  capable  of  judging  of  such 
matters.  Colonel  and  Medical  Director  Cinder,  of  the 
Division  of  the  Atlantic,  in  his  official  report,  com- 
mended their  condition  in  every  respect,  in  spite  of  the 
hard  duty  they  had  suddenly  imposed  upon  them.  He 
said,  "  It  is  quite  remarkable  that  men  performing  such 
service  are  able  to  keep  themselves  and  their  arms,  etc., 
so  clean."  "The  officers  evidently  take  pride  in  looking 
after  the  health  and  comfort  of  the  men." 

In  general  orders,  General  Hancock,  who  knew  what 
a  soldier  should  be,  bore  testimony  to  this  battalion's 
" soldierly  bearing,  excellent  discipline,  and  devotion  to 
duty"  during  a  veiy  trying  time,  and  especially  men- 
tioned "  Major  Charles  Heywood,  of  the  marines."  In 
[880  Major  Heywood  went  to  the  marine  barracks  at 
Mare  Island,  and  returned  to  the  command  of  the 
Brooklyn  Barracks  in  1883.  In  1 885,  by  telegraphic 
order,  and  within  twenty-four  hours,  equipped  two  hun- 
dred and  fifty  men  to  go  to  Panama,  to  open  the  transit, 
and  protect  American  lives  and  property.  After  reach- 
ing  the  Isthmus  Colonel  Heywood  was  reinforced,  and 
had  under  his  command  nearly  eight  hundred  marines, 
and  a  strong  detachment  of  sailors,  with  artillery.  For 
the  arduous  service  there  the  admiral  commanding  asked 
1  olonel  Heywood  to  "receive  his  grateful  acknowledg- 
ments." 

Colonel    Heyw 1    is    now   the    commandant  of  the 

Marine  Corps  of  the  L  nited  States. 


WHO  SERVED    IN   THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


199 


MAJOR  JOHN   HENLEY   HIGBEE,   U.S.M.C. 

Major  John  Henlev  Higbee  was  born  in  New  York 
(  itv  September  1  I,  1839.  He  is  the  son  of  the  late  Rev. 
Dr.  Edward  Y.  Higbee,  of  Trinity  Church,  New  York. 
On  his  mother's  side  he  is  descended  from  the  Henley 
and  Dandridge  families  of  Virginia.  Leonard  Henley, 
Major  Higbee's  great-grandfather,  married  Elizabeth 
Dandridge,  the  sister  of  Martha  Washington.  Commo- 
dore John  Dandridge  Henley,  U.  S.  Navy,  grandfather  of 
Major  Higbee,  and  nephew  of  Mrs.  Washington,  received 
his  warrant  as  midshipman  from  the  hands  of  General 
Washington  himself. 

Major  Higbee's  grandaunt,  Mis.  Francis  Dandridge 
Lear,  a  niece  of  Mis.  Washington,  married  Colonel  Lear, 
military  secretary  of  General  Washington,  and  lived  for 
many  years  with  General  and  Mrs.  Washington  at 
Mount  Vernon.  Major  Higbee  entered  the  Marine 
Corps  as  second  lieutenant  March  9,  1861.  In  June  of 
the  same  year  he  was  ordered  to  the  LT.  S.  S.  "Vin- 
cennes,"  West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron.  lie  was  com- 
missioned as  first  lieutenant  September  1,  1861.  While 
attached  to  the  "  Vincennes,"  he  was  sent  upon  a  number 
of  expeditions  up  the  Blackwater  River,  Florida,  in  com- 
pany with  detachments  of  the  army.  Joined  the  U.  S.  S. 
flag-ship  "  I  Iartford,"  Admiral  Farragut,  September,  1862. 
Took  part  in  the  battles  of  Port  Hudson,  Vicksburg, 
Warrenton,  and  Grand  Gulf,  March  14,  19,  21,  23,  and 
28,  1863;  bombardment  of  Port  Hudson  Ma}-  27,  [863, 
and  was  present  at  the  surrender  of  the  latter  place  ; 
was  brevetted  captain  for  'gallantry  in  battle  May  25, 
1863. 

During  the  month  of  April,  1 863,  while  the  "  Hartford" 
was  blockading  the  mouth  of  the  Red  River,  First  Lieu- 
tenant Higbee  was  selected  by  Admiral  Farragut  to  per- 
form picket  duty.  The  admiral  expected  a  night  attack 
by  the  rebel  ram  fleet,  then  at  Alexandria,  and  after  dark 
Lieutenant  Higbee  was  sent,  every  other  night,  about 
three  miles  up  river  in  a  canoe  paddled  by  two  contra- 
bands. He  was  provided  with  rockets  to  signal  the 
"  Hartford"  in  case  of  any  movement  on  the  part  of  the 
rebel  fleet.  In  going  up  river,  Lieutenant  Higbee  was 
obliged  to  pass  close  to  a  rebel  picket,  making  the  duty 
extremely  hazardous.     Lieutenant-Colonel  Broome,  then 


Captain  Broome,  at  the  time  in  command  of  the  marines 
of  Admiral  Farragut's  fleet,  states  as  follows:  "  I  know 
there  was  no  individual  service  rendered  by  any  one 
moie  gallant  and  hazardous  during  the  war  of  the  Re- 
bellion." 

Lieutenant  Higbee  was  ordered  to  marine  barracks, 
New  York,  August,  1S63.  Commissioned  captain  June 
IO,  1S64.  Receiving-ship  "  North  Carolina,"  1864;  ma- 
rine barracks,  Norfolk,  Virginia,  1865;  flag-ship  "New 
Hampshire,"  1S65-66;  marine  barracks,  New  York, 
1866;.  marine  recruiting  rendezvous,  1866-68;  marine 
barracks,  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  1868-69;  marine- 
barracks,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  1869;  fleet  marine- 
officer,  Pacific  Station,  1870-73;  marine  barracks,  Mare- 
Island,  California,  1S71;  marine  barracks,  Portsmouth, 
New  Hampshire,  1873—78;  fleet  marine-officer,  Asiatic 
Station,  1878-81  ;  marine  barracks,  Boston,  Massachu- 
setts, 1881-82;  marine  barracks,  navy-yard,  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  1883-86;  commanded  Second  Battalion  of 
marines  on  Isthmus  of  Panama,  April,  1S85  ;  marine 
barracks,  Norfolk,  Virginia,  1886;  marine  barracks, 
Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  18S8-92  ;  commissioned 
as  major  1 8th  of  August,  1 889.  At  present,  March, 
1892,  commanding  marine  barracks,  Portsmouth,  New 
Hampshire. 


20O 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND  NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   WILLIAM    HOFFMAN,  U.S.A. 

Captain  William  Hoffman  was  bom  in  Maine  Feb- 
ruary [8,  1839.  An  a  soldier,  he  graduated  on  the 
battle-field  in  that  distinguished  and  well-remembered 
regiment,  the  Fifth  New  York  Volunteer  Infantry  (Dur- 
yea's  Zouaves).  lie  enlisted  in  the  New  York  State 
service  April  23,  1861,  and  was  mustered  into  the  United 
States  service  as  sergeant,  Company  G,  May  9,  [861. 

He  participated  in  the  affair  of  Big  Bethel,  the  affair  at 
Pamunkey  Bridge,  the  battles  of  Hanover  Court-]  louse, 
Gaines'  Mill,  White  Oak  Swamp,  Charles  City  Cross- 
Roads,  and  Malvern  Hill. 

He  was  appointed  second  lieutenant,  Fifth  New  York- 
Volunteer  Infantry,  July  26,  [862,  "for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious conduct  upon  the  field  of  battle.'' 

He  participated  in  the  battle  of  Manassas  Plains  (sec- 
ond Bull  Run),  where  lie  received  three  severe  rifle-ball 
wounds, — one  through  the  left  arm,  grazing  the  bone; 
cmc  under  left  shoulder-blade,  glancing  on  ribs;  and  one 
through  the  fleshy  portion  of  right  thigh  ;  and  in  this  same 


battle  his  brother  Edward  was  killed  beside  him  (see 
"  Rebellion  Records,"  Series  I.,  Vol.  II.,  Part  II.,  page  504). 

lie  was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant,  Fifth  New  York 
Volunteer  Infantry,  September  24,  1862,  "  for  gallant  ser- 
vices upon  the  field  of  battle.'' 

He  rejoined  his  regiment  in  ten  weeks,  and  before  his 
wounds  were  healed. 

lie  participated  in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg;  was 
promoted  to  captain,  Company  B,  Fifth  New  York  Vol- 
unteer Infantry,  January  23,  1863;  participated  in  the 
battle  of  Chancellorsville  ;  and  was  mustered  out  with 
regiment,  at  expiration  of  term  of  service,  May  14,  1863. 

I  le  was  ever  at  the  post  of  duty  and  danger  with  this 
1  elebrated  regiment,  and  he  still  bears  an  enviable  repu- 
tation among  the  few  survivors  of  the  brave  comrades 
of  those  days. 

As  soon  as  he  was  mustered  out  he  began  recruitiner 
in  New  York  City,  and  raised  Battery  B,  Thirteenth  New 
York  Artillery,  and  was  mustered  into  the  Lnited  States 
service  as  its  captain  August  29,  1863.  He  served  about 
two  years  with  this  company  in  the  defences  of  Ports- 
mouth, Virginia,  and  participated  in  a  successful  raid 
upon  Murphree's  Station,  Virginia.  He  commanded  the 
infantry  column  of  the  expedition,  numbering  about  three 
hundred  men. 

He  did  valuable  service  as  chief  of  the  military  police 
at  Norfolk",  Virginia;  and  commanded  Forts  Reno  and 
Cushing  in  the  defences  of  Portsmouth, — about  one  year 
in  each  case. 

About  August  1,  1865,  he  took  station  at  Washington, 
D.  C,  and  was  placed  in  command  of  Fort  De  Russy. 

He  was  mustered  out  with  his  regiment,  near  New 
York  City,  August  24,  1865. 

Upon  his  personal  application  alone,  he  was  appointed 
second  lieutenant,  Eleventh  LT.  S.  Infantry,  .May  1 1,  1866. 
lie  was  transferred  to  Twenty-ninth  Infantry  September 
21,  [866,  anil  promoted  first  lieutenant  June  25,  1S67; 
transferred  to  Eleventh  Infantry  April  25,  1869,  and  pro- 
moted captain  April  24,  1S86. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


20 1 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  SAMUEL  B.  HOLABIRD,  U.S.A. 
(retired). 

Brigadier-General  Samuel  B.  Holabird  was  born 
in  Connecticut  June  \(\  iSjCi,  and  graduated  from  the 
Military  Academy  July  1,  1849.     He  was  promoted  brevet 

second  lieutenant  First  Infantry  the  same  day,  and  second 
lieutenant  June  10,  1850.  He  served  on  frontier  duty, 
and  was  regimental  quartermaster  from  July  I,  1852,  to 
May  31,  1858.  He  was  then  detailed  on  recruiting  ser- 
vice for  two  years,  when  lie  was  ordered  to  the  Military 
Academy,  and  was  adjutant  thereof  from  September  2, 
185^,  to  May  13,  1861.  Me  was  promoted  first  lieutenant 
May  31,  1855.  On  May  13,  1 861,  he  was  appointed  cap- 
tain and  assistant  quartermaster;  Jul}'  2,  1862,  appointed 
major  and  additional  aide-de-camp,  and  Jul}-  11,  1862, 
colonel  and  additional  aide-de-camp.  He  was  lieutenant- 
colonel  of  volunteers  and  inspector-general  of  General 
Dix's  division  (First  Division  of  New  York  Volunteers), 
May  [-13,  1 86 1. 

General  Holabird  served  during  the  war  of  the  Rebel- 
linn  as  quartermaster  at  Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania,  from 
May  29  to  June  10,  [861 ;  in  the  field,  at  Hagerstown, 
Maryland,  with  Patterson's  columns,  to  August  13,  1861  ; 
at  Frederick,  Maryland,  to  March  31,  1862;  chief  quar- 
termaster of  the  division  commanded  by  Major-General 
Banks  to  June,  1862  ;  chief  quartermaster  Second  Army 
Corps,  under  General  Pope,  to  October,  1862,  partici- 
pating in  the  campaign  of  Northern  Virginia  and  the 
subsequent  Maryland  campaign.  He  was  then  assigned 
to  duty  in  New  York  City,  engaged  in  fitting  out  the 
Banks  Expedition,  which  he  accompanied  to  Ship  Island, 
Mississippi,  ami  was  then  made  chief  quartermaster  of 
the  Department  of  the  Gulf,  which  he  retained  until 
July,  1S65,  participating  in  the  mean  time  in  the  siege  of 
Port  I  Iudson,  Louisiana.  He  was  then  made  depot  quar- 
termaster at  New  Orleans,  and  subsequently  chief  quar- 
termaster of  the  Department  of  Louisiana,  until  March, 
1866.  He  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer 
service  May  31,  1866,  and  on  the  29th  of  July  of  that 
year  he  was  appointed  lieutenant-colonel  and  deputy 
quartermaster-general,  and  ordered  to  Washington,  D.C. 

General  Holabird  was  brevetted  major,  lieutenant-colo- 
nel, and  brigadier-general  March  13,  1865,  for  "  faithful 
and  meritorious  services  during  the  war." 


He  was  relieved  from  duty  in  Washington  in  Feb- 
ruary, 1867,  and  assigned  as  chief  quartermaster  of  the 
Department  of  Dakota,  where  he  remained  until  April 
1 8,  1872,  and  was  then  transferred  as  chief  quarter- 
master of  the  Department  of  Texas  to  August  15,  1875. 
On  October  31,  1875,  he  was  chief  quartermaster  of  the 
Military  Division  of  the  Missouri,  and  on  May  6,  1878, 
became  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Military  Division  of 
the  Pacific  and  Department  of  California,  serving  at  San 
Francisco  to  October  15,  1879,  when  he  was  ordered  once 
more  to  Washington,  D.  C,  and  placed  on  duty  in  the 
quartermaster-general's  office.  He  was  promoted  colo- 
nel and  assistant  quartermaster-general  January  22,  1881. 

On  being  relieved  from  duty  in  Washington  April  30, 
18S2,  he  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  general  depot  of 
the  Quartermaster's  Department  at  Philadelphia,  Penn- 
sylvania, which  he  retained  until  July  2,  1883,  when  the 
President  appointed  him  quartermaster-general,  with  the 
rank  of  brigadier-general,  and  he  was  ordered  to  Wash- 
ington, where  he  remained  on  duty  until  retired,  by  oper- 
ation of  law,  June  16,  1890. 

General  Holabird  was  ever  alert  to  the  needs  of  the 
army,  and  while  occupying  the  position  of  quartermaster- 
general  introduced  many  reforms  to  improve  the  condi- 
tion of  the  enlisted  men,  supplying  them  with  comforts 
and  conveniences  which  soldiers  could  scarcely  have 
dreamed  of  a  quarter  of  a  century  before. 


26 


202 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular; 


COMMANDER  EDWARD  HOOKER,  U.S.N. 
(retired). 

Commander  Edward  Hooker  was  born  in  Connec- 
ticut in  [822,  and  bred  to  the  sea  in  the  merchant  marine, 
commanding  a  ship  when  twenty-three  years  old.  One  of 
the  earliest  volunteers  for  the  naval  service  in  the  Civil 
War,  he  was  appointed  acting  master  in  July,  i86t.  His 
first  service  was  in  the  gun-boat  "  Louisiana,"  and,  while 
attached  to  that  vessel,  he  was  severely  wounded  during 
a  boat  expedition  October  5,  1861.  He  was  the  first 
officer  of  his  grade  wounded  during  the  war,  and,  as  years 
roll  round,  these  wounds  are  causing  him  serious  incon- 
venience. 

He  took  an  active  part  in  the  Burnside  Expedition 
while  in  the  "Louisiana."  At  New  Berne  that  vessel 
fired  the  fust  and  last  shut  of  the  action.  Soon  after 
the  capture  of  New  Berne  he  became  the  executive- 
officer  of  the  "Louisiana."  At  the  time  of  the  Con- 
federate attack  upon  Washington,  North  Carolina,  in 
September,  1S62,  the  ship  was  fought  by  Commander 
Hooker,  in  the  absence  of  the  commanding  officer, 
in  a  manner  which  caused  high  commendation  from 
commanding  officers  of  our  own  forces.  The  Con- 
federate view  of  the  matter  we  can  give  from  the  Raleigh 
Standard,  although  space  requires  us  to  condense  the 
article.  The  paper  speaks  of  the  affair  as  "disgraceful" 
to  some  concerned  on  the  Confederate  side.  "  It  is  said 
that  we  lost  three  hundred,  killed  and  wounded,  among 
them  four  captains.  Our  forces  held  the  town  about  two 
hours,  but  were  forced  to  retire  by  the  Yankee  gun-boat 
'Louisiana.'  .  .  .  Our  forces  engaged  consisted  of  the 
Seventeenth  and  Fifty-fifth  North  Carolina  Regiments, 
two  artillery  companies,  ami  six  companies  of  cavalry, 
amounting  to  some  three  thousand  altogether.  .  .  .  Were 


it  not  for  the  gun-boat  the  Union  garrison  would  have 
been  captured,"  for  the  town  was  surprised  at  daybreak, 
the  fortifications  captured,  and  the  guns  turned  on  the 
garrison.  The  rapidity  and  accuracy  of  fire  of  the 
"  Louisiana"  drove  the  Confederates  off,  after  they  were 
in  full  possession. 

for  gallantry  on  this  occasion,  Commander  Hooker 
was  made  acting  volunteer  lieutenant,  to  date  from  the 
day  of  the  action,  lie  was  then  ordered  to  a  command 
in  the  blockade  off  Wilmington,  and  soon  after  to  the 
command  of  a  division  of  the  Potomac  Flotilla,  in  which 
command  he  continued  until  the  end  of  the  war.  In 
[864  he  was  ordered,  with  his  division,  to  co-operate 
with  General  Grant's  army,  and  to  clear  the  Rappahan- 
nock River,  so  that  transports  could  reach  Fredericks- 
burg. This  duty  he  performed,  and  he  remained  at 
Fredericksburg  until  it  was  evacuated  by  our  forces. 
llis  ship  being  then  in  urgent  need  of  repairs,  Com- 
mander Hooker  was  sent  by  Commander  Foxhall 
Parker,  commanding  the  flotilla,  to  the  Washington 
Navy- Yard,  being  then  promoted  to  acting  volunteer 
lieutenant-commander. 

After  the  war  closed  he  was  at  the  New  York  Navy- 
Yard.  He  then  took  the  store-ship  "  Idaho"  to  the 
Asiatic  Squadron,  and  while  there  was  transferred  from 
the  volunteer  to  the  regular  navy  list.  Commissioned 
lieutenant  March,  1868,  and  lieutenant-commander  De- 
cember, 1868.  He  was,  after  this,  captain  of  the  yard  at 
League  Island,  assistant  light-house  inspector,  and  other 
duties,  until  in  February,  1884,  while  on  duty  at  the  Naval 
Home,  at  Philadelphia,  he  was  promoted  to  commander. 
In  December  of  that  year  he  was  placed  upon  the  retired 
list  by  operation  of  law.  Since  then  he  has  resided  in 
Brooklyn,  New  York. 

Commander  Hooker  is  a  lineal  descendant  of  the 
Reverend  Thomas  Hooker,  who  founded  the  colony  of 
Connecticut  and  the  present  city  of  Hartford,  in  1636. 
lie  is  also  descended  from  the  first  mayor  of  the  city  ol 
New  York.  Ilis  grandfather  was  a  colonel  of  the  Revo- 
lutionary War,  and  his  grandmother  was  a  daughter  of 
Major  Griswold,  a  noted  cavalry  officer  in  the  French 
War.  His  father  was  a  graduate  of  Yale,  and,  after  a 
connection  with  Columbia  College,  Smith  Carolina,  de- 
voted his  life  to  scientific  farming  and  to  literature,  in 
Connecticut. 

Commander  Hooker  is  a  Companion  of  the  Loyal 
Legion,  member  of  Rankin  Post,  No.  10,  Grand  Army, 
Connecticut  Society  of  Sons  of  the  Revolution,  the 
Brooklyn  New  England  Society,  Brooklyn  Library  Asso- 
ciation,  Long  Island  Historical  Society,  and  Rhode 
Island  Marine  Society,  and  honorary  member  of  other 
societies;  a  member  of  Aurora  Grata  Club,  Brooklyn, 
and  an  active  member  of  the  Brooklyn  Association  of 
Masonic  Veterans. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


203 


BRIGADIER-  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  JOSEPH 
HOOKER,   U.S.A.  (deceased). 

Brigadier-  and  Brevet  Major-General  Joseph 
Hooker  was  born  in  Massachusetts  and  graduated  from 
the  Military  Academy  July  I,  1837.  He  was  promoted 
second  lieutenant  of  the  First  .Artillery  the  same  day, 
and  first  lieutenant  November  1,  1S38.  He  served  in  the 
Florida  War  of  1837—38,  and  then  was  on  the  Maine 
frontier  at  Houlton,  pending  disputed  territory  contro- 
versy in  1838  ;  and  afterwards,  during  the  Canada  border 
disturbances,  at  Swanton,  Vermont,  and  Rouse's  Point, 
lasting  until  1840.  After  a  short  tour  in  garrison  at  Fort 
Columbus,  he  was  adjutant  of  the  Military  Academy 
from  July  1  to  October  3,  1841.  He  was  adjutant  of  the 
First  Artillery  from  September  11,  1 841,  to  May  11,1  846. 

He  participated  in  the  war  with  Mexico  on  the  staff  of 
Brigadier-General  P.  F.  Smith,  and  of  Brigadier-General 
liarmar,  in  1846,  and  aide-de-camp  to  Major-General 
Butler  in  1847,  and  as  assistant  adjutant-general  of 
Major-General  Pillow's  division  in  1847-48,  being  en- 
gaged in  the  battle  of  Monterey;  defence  of  the  convoy 
at  the  National  Bridge;  skirmish  of  La  Hoya;  battles 
of  Contreras  and  Churubusco,  Molino  del  Rey,  and 
storming  of  Chapultepec,  for  which  he  was  brevetted  cap- 
tain, major,  and  lieutenant-colonel.  He  was  appointed 
brevet  captain  of  staff  (assistant  adjutant-general)  March 
3,  1847,  and  was  assistant  adjutant-general  of  the  Sixth 
Military  Department  from  September  13  to  October  2.S, 
184S;  and  of  the  Pacific  Division  June  9,  1849,  to 
November  24,  1851.  lie  was  promoted  captain  of  the 
First  Artillery  October  29,  1848,  which  he  vacated.  He 
was  on  leave  of  absence  in  1851—53,  and  resigned  from 
the  army  February  21,  1853. 

Upon  leaving  the  arm}-  Colonel  Hooker  went  to  farm- 
ing near  Sonoma,  California ;  was  superintendent  of 
military  roads  in  Oregon  in  1 85 8-59,  and  colonel  of 
California  militia  in  1859-61.  At  the  commencement  of 
the  war  of  the  Rebellion  lie  tendered  his  services  to  the 
government  and  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of  vol- 
unteers May  17,  1 86 1.  He  served  in  the  defences  of 
Washington  City,  and  in  guarding  the  Lower  Potomac 
to  March  io,  1862,  when  he  commanded  a  division  in 
the  Peninsula  campaign  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac. 
He  was  appointed  major-general  of  volunteers  May  5, 
1862,  and  was  engaged  in  the  siege  of  Yorktown ;  bat- 
tles of  Williamsburg  and  Fair  Oaks;  combat  on  the 
Williamsburg  Road ;  battles  of  Glendale,  Malvern  Hill, 
and  reoccupation  and  action  of  the  same  place  August 
5,  1862.  He  commanded  a  division  in  the  Northern 
Virginia  campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  the  action  of 
Bristoe  Station  ;  battles  of  second  Bull  Run  and  Chan- 
tilly.  He  commanded  the  First  Army  Corps  in  the 
Maryland  campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of 
South  Mountain  and  Antietam,  where  he  was  severely 


wounded,  and  was,  in  consequence,  on  sick-leave  to 
November  10,  1862,  when  he  rejoined  the  army,  and  was 
in  command  of  the  Fifth  Corps  to  November  16;  of  the 
Centre  Grand  Division  (Third  and  Fifth  Corps)  to  Janu- 
ary 26,  1863,  and  then  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
being  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg,  action  at 
Kelly's  Ford,  and  battle  of  Chancellorsville  ;  and  then  in 
pursuit  of  the  enemy  to  Pennsylvania,  to  June  28,  1863, 
when  he  relinquished  command  of  the  army,  which  had 
been  engaged  in  the  action  of  Brandy  Station  and  skir- 
mishes at  Aldie,  Middleburg,  and  Upperville. 

General  Hooker  received  the  thanks  of  Congress, 
January  28,  1864,  "  for  the  skill,  energy,  and  endurance 
which  first  covered  Washington  and  Baltimore  from  the 
meditated  blow  of  the  advancing  and  powerful  army  of 
rebels  led  by  General  Robert  E.  Lee,"  and  was  appointed 
brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army  September  20,  1862. 

From  June  28  to  September  24,  1863,  General  Hooker 
was  on  waiting  orders  at  Baltimore,  Maryland,  and  was 
then  assigned  to  command  the  Eleventh  and  Twelfth 
Army  Corps  (consolidated  afterwards  into  the  Twentieth 
Corps),  and  participated  in  the  operations  of  the  Western 
army,  being  engaged  in  all  the  actions  of  that  army  from 
Chattanooga  to  the  siege  of  Atlanta,  in  July,  1S64.  He- 
was  then  placed  on  waiting-orders  until  the  following 
September,  when  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  the 
Northern  Department.  He  was  brevetted  major-general 
U.  S.  Army,  for  "  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the 
battle  of  Chattanooga,  Tennessee." 

General  Hooker  was  assigned  to  the  command  of  the 
Department  of  the  East  July  8,  1865,  and  was  then  given 
the  Department  of  the  Lakes,  where,  after  being  mus- 
tered out  of  the  volunteer  service  September  1,  1866,  he 
remained  to  1867,  and  he  was  retired  upon  the  full  rank 
of  major-general  U.  S.  Army  October  15,  1868.  He  died 
at  Garden  City,  Long  Island,  October  31,  1879. 


204 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  (regular) 


MEDICAL  DIRECTOR   PHINEAS  J.   HoRWITZ.    U.S.N. 
(retired). 

Medical  Director  Phineas  J.  Horwitz  was  born  in 
Maryland  in  March,  1S2J,  and  graduated  in  medicine  at 
the  University  of  Maryland  in  March,  [845.  Appointed 
assistant  surgeon  in  the  navy  November,  1S47,  and  as- 
signed to  duty  in  the  Gulf  Squadron,  then  operating  against 
Mexico.  Dr.  Horwitz  was  at  once  placet!  in  charge  of 
the  Naval  Hospital  at  Tabasco,  and  remained  there  until 
the  close  of  the  war.  This  duty  was  performed  so  ener- 
getically and  efficiently  as  to  receive  the  personal  com- 
mendation and  thanks  of  the  commander-in-chief,  Com- 
modore M.  C.  Perry.  Dr.  Horwitz  then  made  a  cruise 
in  the  Mediterranean  in  the  "Constitution,"  and  was  then 
ordered  to  the  .store-ship  "  Relief,"  bound  to  the  Brazil 
Station.  In  January,  1853,  he  was  examined  and  passed 
for  promotion,  and  was  then  assigned  to  the  steamer 
"  Princeton,"  in  which  he  served  for  two  years.     lie  next 


served  in  the  store-ship  "  Supply,"  on  the  African  and 
Brazil  Stations.  Upon  his  return  to  the  United  States, 
in  1859,  he  was  offered  the  position  of  assistant  to  the 
Bureau  of  Medicine  and  Surgery,  Navy  Department, 
which  office  he  held  until  he  was  appointed*  chief  of  the 
Bureau  of  Medicine  and  Surgery,  Jul)'  1,  1865.  This 
position  he  retained  until  his  term  of  service  expired, 
Jul}-  1,  1S69.  Dr.  Horwitz  was  promoted  to  surgeon  on 
April  19,  1861,  but  his  services  in  the  bureau  were  con- 
sidered so  important  that  he  was  not  permitted  to  vacate 
his  appointment  as  assistant,  and  Congress,  in  acknowl- 
edgment of  the  immense  amount  of  work  he  was  per- 
forming, voted  to  give  him  the  highest  shore-pay  of  his 
grade.  During  the  entire  period  of  the  war  of  the  Re- 
bellion the  labor  of  the  bureau  fell  almost  wholly  upon 
Dr.  Horwitz,  and  his  was  the  only  bureau  in  which  the 
clerical  force  was  not  increased.  The  whole  system  of 
tabulating  the  casualties  of  the  war,  of  indexing  books 
of  reference,  reports  of  survey,  certificates  of  disability 
and  of  diseases,  was  designed  and  carried  forward  by 
Dr.  Horwitz,  so  that  there  was  probably  no  case  of  injury, 
disease,  or  disability  that  occurred  during  his  connection 
with  the  bureau  that  will  not  be  found  in  its  appropriate 
place  in  the  surgeon-general's  office.  The  immense  num- 
ber of  pension  cases  accruing  during  the  war  were  all  ex- 
amined, adjusted,  and  prepared  by  him,  and  every  official 
letter  that  left  the  bureau  was  written  by  him.  All  this 
was  done  without  the  aid  of  a  single  additional  writer.'or 
clerk.  On  leaving  the  bureau,  in  1869,  Dr.  Horwitz  was 
placed  in  charge  of  the  Naval  Hospital  at  Philadelphia, 
and  since  that  time  has  been  assigned  to  various  duties 
at  that  station.  He  was  promoted  to  the  grade  of  medi- 
cal inspector  March  3,  1871,  and  to  that  of  medical  direc- 
tor December  19,  1873.  Was  president  of  the  Examining 
Board  at  Philadelphia,  [883-84.     Retired  in  1884. 


*  Surgeon-general  with  the  tank  of  commodore. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


205 


MAJOR-GENERAL  OLIVER  0.  HOWARD,  U.S.A. 

Major-Genera l  Oliver  O.  Howard  was  born  in 
Maine  November  8,  1830,  and  graduated  at  the  Military 
Academy  Jul)-  1,  1S54.  He  was  appointed  a  brevet 
second  lieutenant  of  ordnance  the  same  da}-,  and  second 
lieutenant  February  15,  1S55.  He  served  at  various 
arsenals  until  1856,  and  was  ordered  to  Florida,  where  he 
participated  in  hostilities  against  the  Seminole  Indians 
in  1S57.  He  was  then  detailed  for  duty  at  the  Military 
Academy,  as  assistant  professor  of  mathematics,  Septem- 
ber 21,  1857,  having  been  promoted  first  lieutenant  July 
1,  1857.  He  resigned  his  commission  in  the  army  June 
7,  1 861. 

General  Howard  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  Third 
Maine  Volunteers  June  4,  [861,  and  served  in  the  de- 
fences of  Washington,  and  commanded  a  brigade  in  the 
Manassas  campaign,  being  engaged  in  the  first  battle  of 
Bull  Run,  July  21,  [861.  He  was  appointed  a  brigadier- 
general  of  volunteers  September  3,  1861,  and  made  a  re- 
connoissance  in  the  early  spring  of  1862  from  Washing- 
ton to  the  Rappahannock  River.  He  participated  in  the 
Peninsula  campaign  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  and 
was  engaged  at  the  siege  of  York  town  and  battle  of  Fair 
(  )aks,  June  i,  1862,  where  lie  was  twice  severely  wounded, 
losing  his  right  arm.  He  was  compelled  to  leave  the  field, 
and  when  convalescent  devoted  himself  to  raising  volun- 
teers. Returning  to  the  field  about  August  27,  1862,  he 
was  engaged  in  a  skirmish  near  Centreville  September 
1,  following.  He  participated  in  the  Maryland  campaign, 
and  was  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Antietam,  Maryland, 
and  in  the  subsequent  march  to  Falmouth  and  battle  of 
Fredericksburg,  Virginia. 

General  Howard  was  appointed  major-general  of  vol- 
unteers November  29,  1862,  and  served,  in  command  of 
the  Eleventh  Army  Corps,  from  April  1,  1863,  and  was 
engaged  in  the  battles  of  Chancellorsville,  Virginia,  and 
Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania,  and  in  pursuit  of  the  enemy 
to  Warrenton,  Virginia  ;  then  guarding  the  Orange  and 
Alexandria  Railroad  until  September,  1863.  His  corps 
was  then  put  en  route  to  Bridgeport,  Tennessee,  and  took 
part  in  the  operations  about  Chattanooga,  being  engaged 
in  the  action  of  Lookout  Valley,  battle  of  Missionary 
Ridge,  and  expedition  for  the  relief  of  Knoxville,  to 
December  17,  1863.  He  was  then  in  occupation  of 
Chattanooga  to  May  3,  1864,  and  was  assigned  to  the 
command  of  the  Fourth  Corps  April  10,  1864,  when  the 
Eleventh  and  Twelfth  Corps  were  consolidated  to  form 
the  Twentieth.  He  commanded  the  Fourth  Corps  until 
July  27,  1864,  when  he  was  assigned  to  the  command  of 
the  Army  of  the  Tennessee  in  the  invasion  of  Georgia. 
He  was  engaged  in  the  operations  around  Dalton,  battle 
of  Resaca,  actions  of  Adairsville  and  Cassville,  battle 
of  Dallas,  action  of  Pickett's  Mill  (May  27,  1864,  where 
he  was  wounded),  battles  and  skirmishes  about  Pine  and 


Kenesaw  Mountains,  actions  of  Smyrna  Camp-Ground, 
combat  of  Peach-Tree  Creek,  siege  of  Atlanta,  combat 
of  Ezra  Church,  battle  of  Jonesborough,  surrender  of 
Atlanta  ami  occupation  of  the  place. 

lie  pursued  the  rebels  under  General  Hood  into 
Alabama,  with  frequent  engagements.  He  participated 
in  the  "  march  to  the  sea,"  and  was  engaged  in  numerous 
actions  and  skirmishes,  including  the  combats  and  actions 
of  General  Sherman's  army  to  the  surrender  of  General 
Johnston,  April  26,  1S65. 

Genera]  Howard  was  appointed  a  brigadier-general  in 
the  U.S.  Army  December  21,  1864,  and  was  brevctted 
major-general,  U.S.A.,  March  13,  1865,  for  "  gallant  and 
meritorious  services  at  the  battle  of  Ezra  Church  ami 
during  the  campaign  against  Atlanta,  Georgia." 

At  the  conclusion  of  the  war  General  Howard  was 
appointed  commissioner  of  the  Bureau  of  Refugees, 
Freedmen,  and  Abandoned  Lands,  at  Washington,  D.C., 
May  12,  1865. 

He  commanded  the  Department  of  the  Columbia  from 
Jul)-,  1S74,  to  18S0,  and  was  superintendent  of  the  Mili- 
tary Academy  from  June  21,  18S1 ,  to  September  1,  1882, 
when  he  was  ordered  to  the  command  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Platte.  He  was  appointed  a  major-general 
in  the  U.  S.  Army  March  19,  1886,  and  assigned  to  the 
command  of  the  Military  Division  of  the  Pacific,  from 
which  he  was  relieved,  in  1S88,  and  assigned  to  the 
Military  Division  of  the  Atlantic.  Divisions  having 
been  discontinued,  he  now  commands  the  Department 
of  the  East. 

General  Howard  had  the  degree  of  A.M.  conferred 
by  Bowdoin  College,  Maine,  in  1853 ;  the  degree  of 
LL.D.  conferred  by  Waterville  College,  Maine,  in 
1865;  the  same  by  Shurtleff  College,  Illinois,  in  1865; 
and  by  Gettysburg  Theological  Seminary,  Pennsylvania, 
in  1866. 


206 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  A. YD   NAVY  regular) 


CAPTAIN  HHNRY   L.  HOWE,  U.S.A. 

Captain  Henry  L.  Howe  (Seventeenth  Infantry)  was 
born  in  Massachusetts  January  2,  185 1.  '  Prior  to  enter- 


ing  the  volunteer  service  he  was  sergeant  of  Captain 
George  C.  Whitcomb's  Company  of  State  Militia  of 
Minnesota,  and  participated  in  operations  against  Little 
Crow's  band  of  hostile  Sioux  Indians  from  August  25  to 
I  October  17,  1862,  participating  in  three  engagements 
with  said  Indians. 

He  entered  the  volunteer  service  during  the  war  of  the 
Rebellion,  and  was  private  ami  first  sergeant  of  Com- 
pany B,  Independent  Battalion  of  Minnesota  Cavalry, 
from  July  1,  1863,  to  June  29,  1864,  when  he  was  ap- 
pointed second  lieutenant  of  the  same  battalion,  and 
promoted  first  lieutenant  July  6,   [865. 

He  was  honorably  mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  ser- 
vice May  30,  1866,  having  been  appointed  second  lieu- 
tenant in  the  Seventeenth  U.  S.  Infantry  I-'ebruary  23, 
1 866. 

He  joined  his  regiment  at  Hart's  Island,  New  York, 
anil  has  served  with  it  at  various  stations  in  the  several 
military  departments. 

He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  July  28,  1 866,  and 
captain  June  I,  1S75. 


WHO   SERVED   IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


207 


RF.AR-ADMIRAL  JOHN  C.  HOWELL,  U.S.N,  (retired). 

Rear-Admiral  John  C.  Howell  was  born  in  Penn- 
sylvania November  24,  1S19,  coming  of  people  who 
had  always  been  distinguished  in  the  colonial  and  war- 
like history  of  the  States  of  New  Jersey  and  Pennsyl- 
vania. He  was  appointed  a  midshipman  from  Penn- 
sylvania on  June  9,  1 836,  and  made  a  cruise  in  the 
West  Indies  in  the  sloop-of-war  "  Levant,"  which  ex- 
tended to  nearly  four  years.  He  was  promoted  to 
passed  midshipman  Jul)'  I,  1842,  and  served  on  board 
the  frigate  "Congress"  in  the  Mediterranean  for  two 
years.  He  then  went  to  the  East  Indies  in  the  brig 
"  Perry,"  served  in  her  from  1X44  to  1845,  and  then  was 
naval  storekeeper  at  Macao, — the  most  charming  place 
in  (he  East  at  that  period, — from  1845  to  1848.  He 
became  a  lieutenant  in  August,  1849,  and  made  cruises 
in  the  frigate  "  Raritan,"  of  the  Home  Squadron,  and 
sloop  "Saratoga,"  of  the  East  India  Squadron,  return- 
ing home  in  1854.  After  two  years'  service  at  the 
Philadelphia  station  he  next  made  a  cruise  in  the  Med- 
iterranean in  the  fine  steamer  "  Susquehanna,"  and  again 
came  back  to  duty  in  Philadelphia.  When  the  Civil 
War  began,  Lieutenant  Howell  was  ordered  to  the 
"  Minnesota"  steam-frigate,  and  served  in  her  at  the 
battle  of  Hatteras  Inlet. 

He  was  commissioned  as  commander  in  the  navy 
July  16,  1862,  and  commanded  the  steamer  "  Tahoma," 
of  the  East  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron,  in  1862-63.  He 
was  then  transferred  to  the  command  of  the  "  Nereus," 
of  the  North  Atlantic  Blockading  Squadron,  and  in  her 
was  in  the  two  actions  at  Fort  Fisher  in  December,  1864, 
and  January,  1865. 


He  was  commissioned  as  captain  July  25,  1866,  and 
was  in  charge  of  recruiting  duty  at  Philadelphia  for 
two  years.  He  next  served  as  fleet-captain  and  chief 
of  staff  of  the  European  Squadron  from  186910  1871. 
Commanded  the  League  Island  Station  in  1871-72. 

Commissioned  as  commodore  January  29,  1872,  and 
commanded  the  Portsmouth  Navy- Yard  until  1875,  when 
he  was  made  chief  of  the  Bureau  of  Yards  and  Docks, 
in  the  Navy  Department,  for  the  term  of  four  years, — 
this  being  an  office  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  U.  S. 
Senate. 

He  was  commissioned  as  rear-admiral  in  1877,  and 
was  in  command  of  the  European  Station  for  two  years. 
He  was  retired  in  18S1,  under  the  operation  of  law. 


208 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AXD  NAVY  (regular) 


CAPTAIN   RICHARD   L.   HOXIE,   U.S.A. 

Captain  Richard  L.  Hoxie  (Corps  of  Engineers)  was 
born  in  New  York  City  August  7,  1S44,  in  the  eighth 
generation  from  Lodovic  Hanksie,  who  settled  at  Sand- 
wich, Massachusetts,  in  [650,  and  is  the  great-grandson 
of  Lieutenant  Pelig  Hoxsie,  of  the  First  Rhode  Island 
(Lippitt's)  Regiment  of  the  Revolutionary  army.  His 
earl}-  education  was  obtained  in  the  public  and  private 
schools  at  New  York  and  Pennsylvania,  and  in  Europe, 
and  at  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  War  he  was  a  student  in 
the  State  University  of  Iowa,  at  Iowa  City.  Here  he 
enlisted  in  Company  F,  First  Regiment  Iowa  Volunteer 
Cavalry,  June  13,  1 861,  and  marched  to  regimental  ren- 
dezvous at  Burlington,  Iowa,  \\  here  the  regiment  was  soon 
after  mustered  into  the  service  of  the  United  States.  Upi  >n 
this  occasion  he  was  rejected  by  the  mustering  officer 
because  oi  the  fact  that  he  was  only  sixteen  years  of  age, 
but,  continuing  to  serve  with  the  company,  he  was  mus- 
tered in  a  few  months  later.  He  served  continuously 
with  this  regiment,  which  took  the  field  in  October,  1861, 
in  Missouri  and  Arkansas,  up  to  the  taking  of  Little 
Rock,  and  the  subsequent  expedition  to  Camderi  in  1S64. 
At  this   time  the    period   of  service  of  the   regiment  was 


about  to  expire.  He  was  the  first  soldier  to  re-enlist  in 
the  regiment  as  a  veteran  volunteer,  in  January,  1S64,  and 
was  followed  by  about  six  hundred  more, — a  very  large 
proportion  of  the  effecth  e  strength.  I  le  received  honor- 
able mention  in  official  correspondence  for  conduct  in 
action,  and  three  separate  tenders  of  a  commission, — the 
latter  declined, — and  finally  an  appointment  to  the  Mili- 
tary Academy  at  West  Point  from  the  veteran  volun- 
teers, to  accept  which  he  was  mustered  out  of  the 
volunteer  service  June  io,  1S64.  1  le  was  graduated  from 
the  Military  Academy  June  13,  [868,  and  promoted 
second  lieutenant  of  Engineers  June  15,  1868;  served 
with  the  Engineer  Battalion  at  Jefferson  Barracks,  Mis- 
souri, from  October  I,  1868,  to  September  5,  1.H70,  under 
General  H.  W.  Benham  ;  in  charge  of  construction  and 
repair  of  fortifications  in  Boston  harbor,  Massachusetts, 
from  September  5,  1S70,  to  July  3,  1872  ;  promoted  to 
first  lieutenant  September  22,  1S70;  on  explorations  and 
surveys  in  the  Western  Territories  from  July  ^,  1872,  to 
July  2,  1S74;  nominated  by  President  Grant  as  member 
of  the  Board  of  Public  Works  of  the  District  of  Colum- 
bia, under  the  Territorial  government,  in  1S74,  and  nomi- 
nation confirmed  by  the  Senate;  detailed  as  engineer  to 
the  Board  of  Commissioners  of  the  District  of  Columbia 
under  the  act  of  June  20,  1874,  and  continuously  engaged 
upon  the  public  works  of  the  district  until  August  14, 
1SN4  ;  promoted  to  the  rank  of  captain,  Corps  of  Engi- 
neers, June  15,  18S2;  in  charge  of  various  works  of 
river  and  harbor  improvement  and  coast  defences  in  the 
States  ot  Georgia,  Florida,  and  Alabama,  from  August  iC, 
1SS4,  to  January  17,  1SS9;  member  of  Engineer  Board 
on  Selma  Bridge  in  1885  ;  since  January  17,  1889,  has 
been  in  command  of  Company  B,  U.  S.  Engineer  Bat- 
talion, stationed  at  Willet's  Point,  New  York  harbor,  and 
instructor  in  military  engineering  and  in  field  astronomy 
at  the  post-graduate  U.  S.  Engineer  School,  at  Willet's 
Point. 

Captain  Iloxic  is  a  member  of  the  American  Society 
of  Civil  Engineers,  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal 
Legion,  U. S.,  and  of  theOrder  of  Sons  of  the  American 
Revolution. 


WHO   SERVED   IN   THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


209 


BRIGADIER-  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  ANDREW 
A.  HUMPHREYS  (deceased). 

Brigadier-  and  Brevet  Major-General  Andrew  A. 
Humphreys  was  born  in  Pennsylvania,  and  graduated 
from  the  Military  Academy  July  I,  [831,  and  was  as- 
signed as  brevet  second  lieutenant  Second  Artillery,  and 
promoted  second  lieutenant  the  same  date. 

lie  was  on  duty  at  Fort  Moultrie,  South  Carolina, 
in  1 83 1,  and  on  special  duty,  making  drawings  at  the 
Military  Academy,  from  January  5  to  April  18,  1832  ;  in 
the  Cherokee  Nation  1832-33,  and  in  garrison  at  Au- 
gusta Arsenal,  Georgia,  1833;  at  Fort  Marion,  Florida, 
1833-34,  and  on  topographical  duty  August  12,  1834,  to 
December,  1835,  making  surveys  in  West  Florida  and  at 
Cape  Cod,  Massachusetts.  He  participated  in  the  Florida 
War  against  the  Seminole  Indians  in  1836,  being  engaged 
in  the  actions  of  Oloklikaha  and  Micanopy. 

lie  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  Second  Artillery 
August  16,  1836,  and  resigned  the  service  September 
30,  1836.  After  resigning  from  the  army  he  was  en- 
gaged as  civil  engineer,  assisting  Major  Bache  in  the 
plans  ofBrandywine  Shoal  Light-house  and  Crow  Shoal 
Breakwater,  Delaware  Bay,  1836-38. 

On  July  2,  1838,  he  was  reappointed  in  the  army  as 
first  lieutenant  Corps  of  Topographical  Engineers. 

He  served  at  Washington  as  assistant  in  the  Topo- 
graphical Bureau  in  1840-41,  and  in  Coast  Survey  Office, 
1844-49. 

He  was  promoted  captain  Corps  of  Engineers  May  31, 
1S48,  and  in  1850  was  detailed  to  make  a  topographic 
and  hydrographic  survey  of  the  delta  of  the  Mississippi 
River,  with  a  view  to  its  protection  from  inundation,  and 
deepening  the  channels  at  its  mouth.  He  continued  on 
this  detail,  having  general  charge,  till  iS6[.  While  en- 
gaged on  this  duty  he  visited  Europe,  examining  means 
for  protecting  delta  rivers  from  inundations,  [853-54, and 
upon  return  he  was  placed  in  general  charge,  under  the 
War  Department,  of  the  office  duties  at  Washington, 
D.  C,  connected  with  explorations  and  surveys  for  rail- 
roads from  the  Mississippi  River  to  Pacific  Ocean,  and 
geographical  explorations  west  of  Mississippi,  1854-61. 

During  the  war  of  the  Rebellion,  1861-65,  he  served 
on  the  staff  of  Major-General  McClellan,  general-in-chief, 
at  Washington,  D.  C,  from  December  1,  1S61,  to  March 

5,  1862,  and  in  the  Virginia  Peninsula  campaign  as  chief 
topographical  engineer  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  from 
March  5  to  August  31,  1862,  being  engaged  in  the  siege 
of  Yorktown,  April  5  to  May  4,  1862. 

He  was  promoted  major   Corps  of  Engineers  August 

6,  1862,  and  colonel,  staff  additional  aide-de-camp,  March 
5,  1862,  and  April  28,  1862,  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Vol- 
unteers. 

He  served  with  distinction  in  the  movements  and  oper- 
ations against    Richmond,  Virginia,  and    on  the  James 
27 


River,  May  and  June,  1862;  in  the  Maryland  and  Rap- 
pahannock campaigns,  lie  was  brevetted  colonel  De- 
cember 13,  1862,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services 
at  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  and  promoted 
lieutenant-colonel  Corps  of  Engineers  March  3,  1863. 

He  participated  in  the  Pennsylvania  campaign,  being 
engaged  in  the  battle  of  Gettysburg,  as  chief  of  staff  of 
General  Meade,  commanding  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
from  July  8,  1863,  to  November  25,  1S64.  On  July  8, 
1863,  he  was  promoted  major-general  U.  S.  Volunteers. 

He  participated  in  the  movements  and  operations  dur- 
ing 1864-65  in  Virginia,  serving  with  distinction  in  the 
various  battles,  actions,  and  sieges,  and  in  the  pursuit  of 
General  Lee's  rebel  army  (including  the  several  actions 
of  the  Second  Corps,  April  6,  1865,  terminating  at 
Sailor's  Creek,  and  actions  at  High  Bridge  and  Farm- 
ville,  April  7,  1865),  till  its  surrender  April  9,  1865. 

He  was  brevetted  brigadier-general  U.  S.  Army  March 
1  5,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  services  at  the  bat- 
tle of  Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania,  and  major-general  U.  S. 
Army  March  13,  1865,  for  gallant  and  meritorious  ser- 
vices at  the  battle  of  Sailor's  Creek,  Virginia.  He  was 
mustered  out  of  the  volunteer  service  May  31,  1866. 

He  was  appointed  brigadier-general  and  chief  of  en- 
gineers of  the  U.  S.  Arm>-  August  8,  1866,  and  was  in 
command  of  the  Corps  of  Engineers  and  in  charge  of  the 
Engineer  Bureau,  August  8,  1866,  until  retired  from  active 
service  June  3,  1879.      He  died  December  27,  1 883. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  American  Philosophical 
Society,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  [857,  and  American 
Academy  of  Arts  and  Sciences,  Boston,  Massachusetts, 
1863.  He  was  the  corporator  of  the  National  Academy 
of  Sciences  since  March  3,  1863;  an  honorary  member 
of  the  Imperial  Royal  Geological  Institute  of  Vienna, 
Austria,  1862,  and  of  the  Royal  Institute  of  Science  and 
Art  of  Lombardy,  Milan,  Italy,  1864. 


2IO 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  .IRMY  AND   NAVY  [kegulak) 


COLONEL    AND    BREVET    MAJOR-GENERAL    HENRY 
J.   HUNT.   U.S.A.  (deceased). 

Colonel    and    Brevet   Major-General   Hexk\    J, 
Hunt  was  born  in  Michigan,  and   graduated   from  the 

Military  Academy  July  i,  1839.  He  was  promoted  the 
same  day  to  second  lieutenant  Second  Artillery,  and 
.  rved  on  the  Northern  frontier  during  the  Canada  bor- 
der disturbances.  Afterwards  he  was  stationed  at  posts 
on  the  Lakes,  and  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  June 
IS,  1846. 

lie  participated  in  the  war  with  Mexico,  and  was 
engaged  in  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz,  battle  of  Cerro 
Gordo,  capture  of  San  Antonio,  battle  of  Churubusco, 
battle  el"  Molino  del  Rey  (where  he  was  twice  wounded), 
storming  of  Chapultepec,  and  assault  and  capture  of  the 
City  of  Mexico  September  13,  14,  1 S47. 

For  this  service  Lieutenant  Hunt  was  brevetted  cap- 
tain August  20,  184;,  "for  gallant  and  meritorious  con- 
duct in  the  battles  of  Contreras  and  Churubusco,  Mexico;" 
and  maj.»r  September  13.  1S47,  "for  gallant  and  merito- 
rious conduct  in  the  battle  of  Chapultepec,  Mexico." 

After  the  close  of  the  Mexican  War,  Lieutenant  Hunt 
was  stationed  at  Fort  McIIenry,  Fort  Monroe,  and  Fori 
Moultrie,  and  was  promoted  captain  Second  Artillery 
September  28,  1852.  Then  he  was  ordered  on  frontier 
duty  at  boit  Smith,  Arkansas,  and  Fort  Washington, 
Indian  Territory,  until  detailed  as  member  of  a  board  to 
revise  the  system  of  light-artillery  tactics,  which  was 
adopted  lor  the  army  March  6,  i860.  He  was  at  Fort 
Kearney,  Nebraska,  in  1858;  Fort  Brown,  Texas,  in 
i860,  and  Harper's  berry,  Virginia,  t86i.  lie  was  pro- 
moted major  filth  Artillery  May  14,  [861,  and  partici- 
pated in  the  defence  of  fort  Pickens,  to  June  28,  and   in 


the  Manassas  campaign  of  Virginia,  being  engaged  in 
the  battle  of  first  Bull  Run,  July  21,  1 86 1,  when  he  was 
in  command  of  the  artillery  on  the  extreme  left. 

Major  Hunt  was  chief  of  artillery  in  the  defences  of 
Washington,  south  of  the  Potomac,  until  appointed  colo- 
nel of  staff, — additional  aide-de-camp,  September  28, 
1861,  and  participated  in  the  Peninsula  campaign  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac  to  August,  1862,  in  command  of 
the  Reserve  Artillery,  and  was  engaged  in  the  siege  of 
Yorktown,  battle  of  Gaines'  Mill,  action  of  Garnett's 
Farm,  action  of  Turkey  Bend,  battle  of  Malvern  Hill, 
and  various  skirmishes. 

Colonel  Hunt  was  chief  of  artillery  in  the  Maryland 
campaign,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  South 
Mountain  and  Antietam,  and  the  subsequent  march  to 
Falmouth,  terminating  with  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg. 
He  was  in  the  mean  time  appointed  brigadier-general  of 
volunteers  September  15,  1862. 

As  chief  of  artillery,  General  Hunt  served  in  all  the 
remaining  campaigns  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  to 
the  end  of  the  war,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of 
Chancellorsville,  Gettysburg,  Mine  Run,  Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania,  Cold  Harbor,  siege  of  Petersburg,  from 
June  15,  1864,  to  April  3,  1863,  including  the  assaults  on 
the  enemy's  works,  combat  at  Fort  Steadman,  anil  pur- 
suit of  the  enemy  after  the  assault  of  April  2,  1865.  until 
the  capitulation  of  General  Lee,  at  Appomattox  Court- 
House,  Virginia,  April  9,  1S65. 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  Third 
Artillery  August  1,  1SO3,  and  was  brevetted  colonel, 
brigadier-general,  and  major-general  for  gallant  and  meri- 
torious sen  ices  in  action.  He  was  also  brevetted  major- 
general  of  volunteers  Jul}-  0,  1864,  for  "gallantry  and 
distinguished  conduct  at  the  battle  of  Gettysburg,  and 
for  faithful  and  highly  meritorious  services  in  the  cam- 
paign from  the  Rapid. in  to  Petersburg,  Virginia." 

At  the  cli  ise  1 if  the  w  ar  ( ieneral  I  i  unt  was  in  command 
of  a  camp  of  instruction  for  field  artillery,  near  Bladens- 
burg,  Maryland,  from  June  to  August,  1S65,  and  of  the 
frontier  district  of  Arkansas,  at  Fort  Smith,  from  Sep- 
tember, 1865,  to  April,  1  866,  when  he  was  mustered  out 
of  the  volunteer  service.  He  then  reverted  to  his  rank 
of  lieutenant-colonel  Third  Artillery,  and  was  member  of 
aboard  for  the  armament  of  fortifications,  and  in  com- 
mand of  various  posts,  and  was  promoted  colonel  Fifth 
Artillery  April  4,  1869.  For  a  long  time  he  was  one  of 
the  prominent  candidates  for  brigadier-general  in  the 
regular  army;  but  the  fates  were  against  him,  ami  he- 
was  retired  forage  September  14.  1883.  He  died  while 
in  command  of  the  Soldiers'  Home  at  Washington, 
I  >.  C,  February  1  1 ,  1 SS9. 


WHO  SERVED   TN  THE  CIVIL    WAR. 


211 


CAPTAIN   JAMES   M.    INGALLS,    U.S.A. 

Captain  James  M.  Ingalls  (First  Artillery)  was  born 
in  the  town  of  Sutton,  Vermont,  January  25,  1X37.  In 
his  early  youth  his  parents  moved  to  Massachusetts, 
where  he  began  his  education  in  the  public  schools. 
After  reaching  manhood  he  went  to  the  then  West,  and 
for  four  years  was  professor  of  mathematics  in  Evans- 
ville  Seminary,  Wisconsin.  At  the  beginning  of  1S64 
he  enlisted  in  Company  A,  First  Battalion,  Sixteenth 
Regular  Infantry,  then  stationed  at  Columbus,  Kentucky, 
as  head-quarters  guard,  having  been  promised  by  the 
captain  of  the  company  as  rapid  advancement  to  a  com- 
mission as  possible.  In  the  latter  part  of  January,  1864, 
Company  A  was  ordered  to  join  the  remainder  of  the 
regiment  at  Chattanooga,  Tennessee,  in  readiness  for  the 
opening  of  the  Atlanta  campaign.  He  was  promoted  to 
second  lieutenant  of  his  regiment  May  3,  1865,  and  served 
with  his  company  at  various  places  in  Tennessee,  Georgia, 
and  Alabama.  He  was  promoted  first  lieutenant  May  3, 
1S65,  and  upon  the  consolidation  of  regiments  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  Second  Infantry  April  17,  1869,  having  per- 
formed the  duties  of  quartermaster  of  the  First  Battalion 
of  the  Sixteenth  Infantry  from  June  4,  1865,  to  Septem- 
ber 21,  1866.  During  his  tour  of  duty  in  the  Southern 
States  he  was  engaged  in  the  extremely  disagreeable  ser- 
vice connected  with  reconstruction  until  January  1,  1871, 
when  he  was  transferred  to  the  First  Artillery,  his  present 
regiment.  lie  was  assigned  to  Battery  A  (Sih«ey's),  sta- 
tioned at  Fort  Ontario,  Oswego,  New  York,  but  was 
transferred  to  Battery  G  (Elder's)  for  a  tour  of  duty  at  the 
Artillery  School,  Fort  Monroe,  May  I,  I  87 1. 

He  was  transferred,  May  1,  1872,  to  Battery  M  (Lang- 
don's),  at  Plattsburg  Barracks,  and  followed  its  fortunes 
(including  three  yellow-fever  epidemics  at  Forts  Jefferson 
and  Barrancas)  until  July  1,  1880,  when  he  was  promoted 
to  a  captaincy,  and  assigned  to  the  command  of  Battery 
A,  stationed  at  Governor's  Island,  New  York  harbor. 

In  September,  1 88 1 ,  his  battery  was  selected  by  General 
Hancock  to  guard  the  Franklyn  Cottage  at  Elberon,  New 
Jersey,  while  it  was  occupied  by  President  Garfield. 

At  the  request  of  General  Getty,  commanding  the 
Artillery  School,  Captain  Ingalls  was  transferred  to  Bat- 
tery G  of  his  regiment,  stationed  at  Fort  Monroe,  upon 
the  promotion  of  Captain  Elder,  who  had  for  many  years 
been  an  instructor  at  the  school.     In  December,  1882,  at 


the  suggestion  of  Captain  Ingalls,  the  Department  of 
Ballistics  was  created  at  the  Artillery  School  and  placed 
in  his  charge,  with  the  understanding  that  he  should 
prepare  a  suitable  text-book  for  the  use  of  the  school, 
which  should  embrace  all  the  best  modern  methods 
employed  in  Europe.  This  work,  printed  at  the  Artillery 
School,  was  ready  for  use  in  September,  1883,  and  was 
the  first  treatise  on  Exterior  Ballistics  ever  published  in 
the  United  States.  A  second  edition  was  published  by 
the  Artillery  School  in  January,  1885,  and  a  third  edition 
from  the  press  of  D.  Van  Nostrand  appeared  in  1 886. 

Other  professional  works  prepared  by  Captain  Ingalls 
are  :  "  Ballistic  Machines,"  from  the  Artillery  School 
press,  1885  ;  "  Hand-book  of  Problems  in  Exterior 
Ballistics,"  Artillery  School,  1889;  and  a  second  edition 
by  John  Wiley  &  Sons,  1890;  "Ballistic  Tables  for 
Direct,  Curved,  and  High-Angle  Fire,"  John  Wiley  & 
Sons,  1891  ;  "  Interior  Ballistics,"  Artillery  School  press, 
1 891. 

In  addition  to  his  ballistic  work,  Captain  Ingalls  was 
senior  instructor  of  practical  artillery  exercises  to  the 
class  of  1884;  senior  instructor  of  engineering  to  the 
class  of  1 888;  senior  instructor  of  electricity  and  defen- 
sive torpedoes  to  the  classes  of  1884,  1886,  1888,  and 
1890;  senior  instructor  of  telegraph}- to  the  classes  of 
1S84,  1 886,  and  1888  ;  and  senior  instructor  of  signalling 
from  8th  May,  1884,  to  7th  September,  1888. 


212 


OFFICERS   OF  THE  ARMY  AND   NAVY  {regular) 


BRIGADIER-  AND  BREVET  MAJOR-GENERAL  RUFUS 
INGALLS,   U.S.A.  (retired). 

Brigadier- and  Brevet  Major-General  Rufus  lx- 
gaj  ls  was  born  in  the  State  of  Maine,  and  entered  the 
Military  Academy  July  1,  [839.  He  was  promoted 
brevet  second  lieutenant  Rifles  July  1,  1843,  and  served 
on  frontier  duty  at  Forts  Jesup,  Louisiana,  and  Leaven- 
worth, Kansas,  till  the  war  with  Mexico,  [846-47,  in 
which  he  participated,  being  engaged  in  the  skirmish  of 
Embudo,  January  29,  1847,  and  the  assault  of  Pueblo  de 
Taos,  February  4,  1847.  ' )n  March  17,  [845,  he  was 
promoted  second  lieutenant  First  Dragoons,  and  on  Feb- 
ruary 4,  1847,  brevetted  first  lieutenant,  for  gallant  and 
meritorious  conduct  in  the  conflicts  .it  Kmbudo  and  Taos. 

After  completing  a  tour  of  recruiting  service,  1847-48, 
he  accompanied  the  troops  on  the  voyage  to  California, 
via  Cape  Horn,  in  [848,  and  was  on  duty  as  quarter- 
master, .md  served  at  various  posts  in  California  till  1853, 
when  he  returned  to  Washington.  He  served  with  the 
Colonel  Steptoe  Expedition  across  the  continent  via 
Leavenworth,  Kansas,  and  Salt  Lake,  Utah,  to  San 
Francisco,  California,  1854-55  ;  and  at  various  posts  till  . 
[86l,  being  on  the  commission  to  examine  the  war-debt 
of  Oregon  and  Washington  Territory,  1857—58,  he  having 
been,  in  the  mean  time,  promoted  first  lieutenant,  Febru- 
ary [6,  1 S47  ;  and  captain  (on  staff,  assistant  quarter- 
master) January  \2,   (848. 

During  the  war  of  the  Rebellion  he  served  at  Fort 
Pickens,  Florida,  from  April  20  to  July  15,  186]  ;  and  as 
chief  quartermaster  of  the  forces  occupying  the  defences 


of  Washington,  D.  C,  south  of  the  Potomac;  and  at 
Annapolis,  Maryland,  and  Alexandria,  Virginia,  receiving 
transports  and  superintending  the  embarkation  of  the 
Army  of  the  Potomac  to  the  Virginia  Peninsula  cam- 
paign, March  1  to  April   2,  1862. 

(  )n  September  28,  1861,  he  was  promoted  lieutenant- 
colonel  of  staff,  additional  aide-de-camp,  and  major  of 
staff,  quartermaster,  January  12,  icS62,  for  fourteen  years' 
continuous  service  as  captain. 

Dining  the  year  [862  General  Ingalls  had  charge  of 
the  depots  of  Port  Monroe,  Cheeseman's  Creek,  York- 
town,  and  White  House,  Virginia;  and  transferred  stores 
to  Harrison's  Landing  via  York  and  James  Rivers,  after 
General  McClellan's  "  change  of  base."  He  was  then 
appointed  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Army  of  the  Poto- 
mac, and  served  in  this  capacity  until  the  close  of  the 
war,  being  present  at  the  battles  of  South  Mountain, 
Antietam,  Fredericksburg,  Chancellorsville,  Gettysburg, 
and  in  pursuit  of  the  enemy  to  Warrenton,  Virginia.  He 
participated  in  the  Mine  Run  operations,  organized  sup- 
pi)'  depots  on  the  Orange  and  Alexandria  Railroad,  and 
participated  in  the  campaigns  of  1864-65,  being  present 
at  the  battles  of  the  Wilderness,  Spottsylvania,  Cold 
Harbor,  and  siege  of  Petersburg  and  Richmond,  and 
established  the  great  army  depot  at  City  Point,  Virginia. 

He  was  appointed  brigadier-general  of  volunteers  May 
2T,,  1863,  and  at  the  close  of  the  war  was  brevetted 
lieutenant-colonel,  col'onel,  and  brigadier-general  U.  S. 
Army,  for  meritorious  and  distinguished  services,  and 
major-general  of  volunteers  and  U.  S.  Army,  for  faithful 
and  meritorious  services. 

He  was  promoted  lieutenant-colonel  and  deputy-quar- 
termaster-general Jul}'  28,  1866;  colonel  and  assistant 
quartermaster-general  July  29,  1866. 

While  chief  quartermaster  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac, 
General  Ingalls  displayed  great  executive  ability  in  sup- 
plying that  vast  arm)-  with  stores  always  at  the  proper 
time  and  in  the  proper  place. 

Upon  the  disbandment  of  that  army  the  general  re- 
mained on  duty  at  Washington  City  to  May  4,  1866, 
when  he  was  ordered  on  special  inspection  duty  across 
the  continent  to  Oregon,  which  occupied  him  until  the 
following  December.  He  was  then  on  waiting  orders  to 
March  31,  1867,  when  he  was  detailed  as  chief  quarter- 
master at  New  York  City.  He  served  there  and  at 
other  stations   until   he  was  appointed  brigadier-general 


and    quartermaster-general    February 


1SS2,   which 


position    he  continued   to    fill    until    retired   from  active 
service,  at  his  own  request,  July  I,  1883. 


WHO   SERVED  IN  THE   CIVIL    WAR. 


213 


MAJOR  JAMES  JACKSON.  U.S.A. 

Major  James  Jackson  (Second  Cavalry)  was  born 
near  Deckertown,  in  Sussex  Count}-,  New  Jersey,  No- 
vember 21,  1833.  After  graduating  from  the  Philadel- 
phia High  School,  he  moved  to  the  West,  and  was  li\  ing 
in  Iowa  when  the  war  1  if  the  Rebellion  broke  out.  In 
the  fall  of  1 861  he  recruited  men  for  the  Twelfth  Regi- 
ment of  Iowa  Volunteers,  under  a  recruiting  commission 
from  Colonel  William  B.  Allison.  But  in  November, 
1861,  he  enlisted  in  the  Twelfth  U.  S.  Infantry,  under 
Captain  Newbury,  of  that  regiment,  and  was  placed  on 
recruiting  duty  for  the  regular  army. 

In  August,  1862,  he  went  "  to  the  field,"  in  Virginia, 
a  sergeant  of  Company  C,  Second  Battalion,  Twelfth 
Infantry,  and  was  engaged  in  the  battles  of  Antietam 
and  Fredericksburg.  In  April,  1863,  he  was  com- 
missioned in  the  regular  service  as  a  lieutenant  in  the 
Twelfth  Infantry,  and  as  such  took  part  in  the  battles  of 
Chancellorsville,  Gettysburg,  Mine  Run,  the  Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania,  Bethesda  Church,  Cold  Harbor,  Peters- 
burg, Weldon  Railroad,  Peeble's  Farm,  and  Hatcher's 
Run,  receiving  the  brevets  of  captain  ami  major  for 
"  gallant  services  in  battle." 

In  November,  1864,  the  Twelfth  Infantry  was  sent 
from  the  field  to  Elmira,  New  York,  to  recruit  and  guard 
Confederate  prisoners.  While  engaged  in  the  latter  duty 
Lieutenant  Jackson  was  detailed  on  regimental  recruiting 
service,  and  on  expiration  of  this  tour  he  joined  the 
regiment  at  Russell  Barracks,  in  Washington,  D.  C, 
being  assigned  to  the  Third  Battalion  of  that  regiment, 
now  become  the  Thirtieth  Infantry. 

He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Nebraska  in  January, 
1867,  and  was  on  duty  at  various  places  in  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Platte,  protecting  the  builders  of  the  Union 
Pacific  Railway  from  hostile  Indians,  until  the  consoli- 
dation of  the  infantry  regiments  in  1S69,  when,  becom- 
ing an  unassigned  captain,  the  department  commander, 
General  C.  C.  Augur,  placed  him  on  duty  as  post  quar- 
termaster at  Fort  Steele,  to  complete  the  construction 
of  that  post. 

In  January,  1871,  Captain  Jackson  was  transferred  to 
the  First  Cavalry,  and  joined  his  troop,  B,  at  Camp 
Warner,  in  Oregon,  changing  station,  soon  after,  to  Fort 
Klamath,  ( )regon,  and  taking  command  of  the  post.  In 
November,  1872,  he  was  sent  with  a  portion  of  his  troop 
to  place  Captain  Jack's  band  of  Modoc  Indians  on  their 
reservation,  and  in  endeavoring  to  carry  out  these  orders 
had  a  fight  with  them  on  Lost  River,  in  Oregon,  which 
commenced  the  "  Modoc  War."     He  was  engaged  in  all 


subsequent  operations  against  these  Indians  until  their 
surrender,  and  was  recommended  for  the  brevet  of  lieuten- 
ant-colonel by  General  Jeff.  C.  Davis,  commanding  the 
tii h ips  in  the  field. 

During  the  Nez  Perce  war  he  was  directed  to  join 
General  Howard,  with  his  troop,  in  Idaho.  His  timely 
arrival  on  the  Clearwater,  at  Cottonwood  Canon,  with 
reinforcements  for  the  troops  engaged  in  fighting  Joseph's 
band  of  Xez  Perces,  broke  the  resistance  of  these  Indians, 
and  caused  the  defeat  and  evacuation  of  their  fortified 
position.  He  joined  in  the  pursuit  of  these  Indians  as 
far  as  the  Judith  Basin,  in  Montana,  from  which  point 
the  cavalry  troops  were  directed  to  return  to  their 
stations.  Captain  Jackson  was  recommended  by  General 
1  low  aid  for  a  brevet  for  his  services  at  Clearwater  and 
during  the  campaign. 

He  was  promoted  major  oi  tin;  Second  Cavalry  De- 
cember 28,  [889,  and  is  at  present  on  duty  at  Fort  Win- 
gate,  New  Mexico. 

Major  Jackson's  great-grandfather,  Colonel  Benjamin 
Loxley,  of  Philadelphia,  org, mixed  ami  was  captain  of 
the  "  Philadelphia  Light-Horse,"  the  first  cavalry  troop 
raised  in  Pennsylvania  during  the  Revolutionary  War, 
Colonel  Loxley  also  raised  and  commanded  "  the  First 
Artillery  Company"  of  Philadelphia,  which  did  such 
effective  work  during  the  war  for  independence,  and  was 
a  volunteer  aide  on  General  Washington's  staff  at  Valley- 
Forge, and  at  other  times  until  independence  was  achieved. 
He  was  also  a  lieutenant  in  the  Pennsylvania  division  of 
Braddoek's  arm)',  and  assisted  in  bringing  off  the  British 
troops  after  General  Braddoek's  defeat. 


214 


OFFICERS   OF   THE  ARMY  AXD   NAVY  regular) 


MEDICAL  DIRECTOR  SAMUEL  JACKSON,   U.S.N. 
(retired). 

Medical  Direi  tor  Samuel  Jackson  was  born  in 
Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.  A  graduate  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  that  State,  he  was  appointed  assistant  surgeon 
in  the  navy,  from  North  Carolina,  in  June,  [838.  In 
January,  [839,  he  received  orders  for  sea-duty,  on  board 
the  United  States  frigate  "  Constitution,"  which  vessel 
went,  as  flag-ship  of  the  Pacific  Squadron,  for  a  term  of 
three  years.  In  those  days  the  cruising  was  mostly  in 
the  South  Pacific,  California  being  seldom  visited  by  any 
ships,  except  those  which  went  there  lor  trade,  and  t<> 
collect  hide--,  the  real  currency  of  the  country,  in  return. 
Returning  to  the  East  from  this  cruise,  Dr.  [ackson  was, 
after  a  short  leave  of  absence,  ordered  to  the  "  Mi^iV 
sippi,"  the  first  steam-frigate  of  the  United  States  navy. 
In  that  vessel  he  served  during  1S41  and  a  part  of  1S42. 
lie  was  then  ordered  to  the  frigate  "Congress,"  of  the 
Mediterranean  Squadron.  He  was  afterwards  detached 
upon  the  station,  and  served,  in  succession,  in  the 
"  Preble,"  "  Fairfield,"  and  frigate  "  Cumberland,"  during 
the  years   1  S43  to   1S45. 


Tlie  year  1846  found  him  on  duty  at  the  navy-yard  at 

Philadelphia  ;  but,  the  Mexican  War  impending,  he  was 
ordered  to  the  razee  "Independence,"  flag-ship  of  the 
Pacific  Squadron,  and  served  on  board  that  ship  until 
the  conclusion  of  the  peace,  1X46-49. 

In  1849-50  he  was  at  the  Philadelphia  Navy- Yard, 
and  then  went  to  the  receiving-ship  "  Franklin,"  at 
Boston,  and  thence  to  sea-service  again  in  the  "John 
Adams,"  and  the  "  Decatur,"  of  the  Home  Squadron. 

He  was  commissioned  as  surgeon  in  September,  1852. 
During  1854—55  he  was  surgeon  of  the  rendezvous  al 
New  York.  He  then  made  a  long  cruise  on  the  coast  of 
Africa,  in  the  sloop-of-war  "St.  Louis,"  and  on  his  re- 
turn was  stationed  at  the  navy-yard  at  New  York  from 
1858  to   [86l. 

During  the  early  part  of  the  Civil  War  he  served  in 
the  frigates  "  Wabash"  and  "  Cumberland,"  and  partici- 
pated in  the  bombardment  and  capture  of  the  Confeder- 
ate forts  at  Hatteras  Inlet.  Soon  after  he  was  ordered  to 
the  "  Brooklyn,"  of  the  West  Gulf  Blockading  Squadron, 
and  served  in  her  for  nearly  two  years,  on  the  blockade 
of  Mobile  and  the  passes,  and  then,  under  Farragut, 
made  the  passage  of  the  Mississippi  forts,  the  Chal